Ski Club 2.0 Home
Snow Reports
FAQFAQ

Mail for help.Help!!

Log in to snowHeads to make it MUCH better! Registration's totally free, of course, and makes snowHeads easier to use and to understand, gives better searching, filtering etc. as well as access to 'members only' forums, discounts and deals that U don't even know exist as a 'guest' user. (btw. 50,000+ snowHeads already know all this, making snowHeads the biggest, most active community of snow-heads in the UK, so you'll be in good company)..... When you register, you get our free weekly(-ish) snow report by email. It's rather good and not made up by tourist offices (or people that love the tourist office and want to marry it either)... We don't share your email address with anyone and we never send out any of those cheesy 'message from our partners' emails either. Anyway, snowHeads really is MUCH better when you're logged in - not least because you get to post your own messages complaining about things that annoy you like perhaps this banner which, incidentally, disappears when you log in :-)
Username:-
 Password:
Remember me:
durr, I forgot...
Or: Register
(to be a proper snow-head, all official-like!)

Why bother to scrape the excess wax off?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
I had my skis serviced just before the end of the season, when not 100% sure whether I would be using them again. The very helpful man in our local (French) ski hire shop left them with a nice thick coat of wax, to protect them for the summer. I asked if I would need to scrape them, if I decided to use them again, or at the beginning of next season, and he said not to bother, the excess would very quickly wear off. I didn't use them, used my old ones instead when it snowed again (remembered then why I had bought new ones...) but it did make me wonder why, if the excess wax scrapes off so quick, all the instructions tell us it should be scraped off. Is the extra work worth while?
latest report     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
The tech was a bit too quick to answer, I'm afraid. Wax is self-cohesive (prefers to stick to itself), so, in large concentrations, will tend to pull neighboring wax off the ski faster than if scraped thin. So, scraping thin effectively just barely covers the base (in fact, the important thing is that it fills the pores in the base), and then the wax, as it's "scraped off" by the snow, will not tend to pull the other wax off, leaving the ski "dry."

Hope this helps...
snow conditions     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
yes, thanks a lot. I see what you are saying - and will give them a scrape before I use them again. The guy, who speaks little or no English, probably thought, quite rightly, that I wouldn't understand a more complicated explanation.
ski holidays     
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
pam w, I also find that if you leave the wax on it slows the skis down to start with, and often wears off unevenly.
snow report     
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
pam w, the type of wax used makes a big difference too. Scraped or not, if a standard 'red' or yellow wet snow wax is used in Arctic temperatures, you will end up sticking to the snow. Ditto with cold temperature wax when skiing on end of season snow with high water content. Also the hard blue waxes for very cold temperatures will last much longer than the soft waxes used for warm weather skiing. Whichever you use, after just one day's hard skiing, there won't be much left of the cold weather wax and virtually none of the soft warm weather wax on your skis.

Ideally those wishing to get the best out of their skis should take an iron with them and wax their skis each evening. Leave it on overnight to ensure it really penetrates the base properly, then scrape in the morning. Ssh is right about the reasons for scraping off as much as possible, but if you wax your skis once a day you don't have to be too diligent in removing every trace of the wax on your skis - that's just for racers. Waxing skis only takes a couple of minutes to do. As for the type of waxes, the main blue (cold), red (standard) and yellow (warm) weather waxes would suffice, although there are plenty of inbetweens and variations for the fanatic.

An aside on edges - old skis are very difficult to sharpen sufficiently. Don't assume that because you have had them done in a shop they will be perfect. Pros test them by running the back of fingers across the edge at 90° - it should feel like the slightest pressure would result in a cut! A diamond file is a useful implement to take with you; if the edges have been properly prepared before a holiday, one of these files is usually enough to freshen the edge up over the remainder of the stay.
snow report     
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Is it worth me buying a waxing iron and some wax in the sale, then, rather than getting the skis waxed at the local shop?


wax
http://www.snowandrock.com/shop/activity/sale/ski/products/EMCCA.htm

ptex
http://www.snowandrock.com/shop/activity/sale/ski/products/EMCCP.htm

scraping blade
http://www.snowandrock.com/shop/activity/sale/ski/products/EMCCN.htm

File
http://www.snowandrock.com/shop/activity/sale/ski/products/EMCCB.htm



Lots of stuff here
http://www.snowandrock.com/shop/activity/sale/ski/index10.htm


Given that it usually costs £20 a pair for a service (wax and edge) this stuff begines to look like a decent investment
snow report     
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
yes, I have been asking myself the same thing, as we are now able to ski most of the season. Our very nice local ski shop guy actually does ours free now and then, because we take visitors in to hire skis now and then, but it is something I ought to know more about. It seems complicated, and I have read a lot of threads and info on the subject. I eventually decide it's too complicated and give up as none of the threads seem to agree. A bit like malaria prophylaxis, where none of the experts ever agree. But having just bought new skis, I should try again.... What I want is the basic, ordinary, just get it done and stop faffing about it, version. Purely recreational skier, not looking to break any records. I could cope with three kinds of wax for different weather, given the length of time I spend in resort, but is it OK to apply one on top of the other when the weather changes (scraping in between, obviously)?

I would quite like to go to a "workshop" session to learn some skills and see it done. I suspect that would be the best way, not trying to read descriptions. Like making bread - can't learn that properly from a book. Have looked on internet, but only found them in N America. Anyone know of anything similar in UK? Will swap for bread making instruction....I make great bread but rubbing it on the bottom of the skis doesn't seem to have helped.
ski holidays     
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
nbt et al, a simple (ideally non-steam, without the steam holes) travel iron is ideal for waxing skis. The iron doesn't need to be very hot. The need for scraping and wasted wax can be reduced by ironing wax on to the ski very sparingly - just 20-30 drips of molten wax along the length of a typical ski is enough - hold the iron at about 45 degrees to the ski base and quickly run it along the ski, dripping wax as you go. Then iron the wax in. The penetration of the base is achieved when the wax is molten, so any scraping can be done soon afterwards.

Use a piece of wire coat hanger to keep the ski brakes disengaged and out of the way of the iron.

One way to apply wax evenly is to use a piece of cloth like a J-cloth, wrapped around the iron. Over successive waxings the J-cloth becomes impregnated with wax and acts like a paint pad - giving a thin even coat. Wax scraping is normally done with a stiff plastic rectangular scraper. A sharpened metal scraper is needed if you're removing P-tex after doing a DIY ski repair, which needs a bit more skill.

Ski edge sharpness can be tested by using the edge to scrape the face of a fingernail. It should be sharp enough to produce fine shavings of the nail.
latest report     
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
pam w, I've seen courses offered by someone based up in the lakes, from a link on this site. I think it cost about £100 for a one day course. I'll see if I can find the link when I get chance - unfortunately I have to get some work done Sad
snow report     
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Of course, a lot of ski wax is available these days in liquid form, which eliminates scraping and the need for any special skills. It can be reasonably long-lasting and penetrating, especially if applied at room temp.
ski holidays     
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
pam w wrote:
But having just bought new skis, I should try again.... What I want is the basic, ordinary, just get it done and stop faffing about it, version. Purely recreational skier, not looking to break any records. I could cope with three kinds of wax for different weather, given the length of time I spend in resort, but is it OK to apply one on top of the other when the weather changes (scraping in between, obviously)?
The simple answer is yes - you can't wax a pair of skis too much (although you can do it at the wrong iron temperature which can damage the base). Regular waxing also helps clean the impurities out of the pores in the base, something else that can slow the skis down.
pam w wrote:
I would quite like to go to a "workshop" session to learn some skills and see it done. I suspect that would be the best way, not trying to read descriptions. Like making bread - can't learn that properly from a book. Have looked on internet, but only found them in N America. Anyone know of anything similar in UK? Will swap for bread making instruction....I make great bread but rubbing it on the bottom of the skis doesn't seem to have helped
If you're ever BSM way, you're welcome to drop in for a ski tuning workshop!
snow conditions     
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
nbt,pam w,having gone down the DIY route last year I can thoroughly recommend it.Whilst it can be a very deep subject(for the racers)at our level its actually quite difficult to cock it up wink Use a travel iron((Challenge from Argos-£8.99)on 1st setting.Get a scraper,choose your wax and off you go.I use a workmate to hold the ski's,and a stiff nylon scrubbing brush to finish the bases.Its a messy affair,so don't do it in the living room Laughing

Plenty of info to be found on here,mostly from our waxing guru D G Orf.Look up the ToKo website;has a manual you can download.And,as PG has a daughter who's a bit useful on race ski's,I think he may know a bit about it wink
snow conditions     



Terms and conditions  Privacy Policy