Ski Club 2.0 Home
Snow Reports
FAQFAQ

Mail for help.Help!!

Log in to snowHeads to make it MUCH better! Registration's totally free, of course, and makes snowHeads easier to use and to understand, gives better searching, filtering etc. as well as access to 'members only' forums, discounts and deals that U don't even know exist as a 'guest' user. (btw. 50,000+ snowHeads already know all this, making snowHeads the biggest, most active community of snow-heads in the UK, so you'll be in good company)..... When you register, you get our free weekly(-ish) snow report by email. It's rather good and not made up by tourist offices (or people that love the tourist office and want to marry it either)... We don't share your email address with anyone and we never send out any of those cheesy 'message from our partners' emails either. Anyway, snowHeads really is MUCH better when you're logged in - not least because you get to post your own messages complaining about things that annoy you like perhaps this banner which, incidentally, disappears when you log in :-)
Username:-
 Password:
Remember me:
durr, I forgot...
Or: Register
(to be a proper snow-head, all official-like!)

tele in powder

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
When skiing in powder should I be weighting my back ski more? I find it rather difficult to turn in powder and more often than not the tip of my back ski dives into the snow. It might be down to me not having a solid stance on piste to start with...
snow report
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
When teleing both on and off piste you should ideally have the weight evenly distributed on each ski. If the tip of the rear ski is diving off piste, then it's highly likely that it's not weighted enough. As a start, I'd recommend two things:
1. On-piste, work on getting a solid stance, and even weighting on each ski. Any flaws on-piste will only have a bigger adverse impact off-piste. One exercise that may help is to concentrate on pushing the rear knee down through the turn
2. Off-piste in soft snow, on a gentle slope, practise transitioning without turning, and making it smooth with even weighting. Start by making it smooth with slow transitions, then try speeding up the transition when keeping it smooth. Throughout, try an get a feeling of the pressure on the rear ski and boot
snow report
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@viv, said
Quote:
One exercise that may help is to concentrate on pushing the rear knee down through the turn

Also maybe think about keeping the rear heel down a bit too, to prevent getting in a too tippy-toe stance resulting in little control of the rear-ski

Try it in your stockinged feet - start in a wide stance and you'll feel the pressure on your toes (not so good); then shorten the stance a bit and try to drop the heel closer to the floor and you should feel the pressure on the ball of your foot just behind the little toe (good).

This should help to pressure the rear ski through the turn, and hopefully give you more control in the soft snow.
snow report
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
Consult Colin Stone, as telemarkers go he's pretty good, no doubt he will be along shortly!
snow conditions
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Good replies already.
Completely agree with even weighting of both skis. Many skiers struggle to get enough weight on the back ski.
I don't know what the equivalent of the ball of your foot on the little toe side is called but this is where the weight on your back foot wants to be (avoiding the tippy-toe stance).
If you're already doing all that you could try moving your bindings back a bit,


Last edited by Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do. on Fri 1-01-21 19:46; edited 1 time in total
ski holidays
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
@brian_m, said
Quote:

Many skiers struggle to get enough weight on the back ski.

Another exercise I really like to get the feel of weighting the back ski is the Monomark turn where you alternately ski tele/alpine turns without making a lead-change -
I posted a description on this thread (and others) a while back https://snowheads.com/ski-forum/viewtopic.php?p=3530375&highlight=monomark#3530375
latest report
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@euanovsky, hi- if your tips are diving then more weight is needed further back on the back ski as has been said. Also what bindings do you use?

75mm bindings tend to cause tip pressure more than NTN (I'm told). So some have their 75mm bindings really quite far back. (I ski with Hammerheads mounted quite far back).
latest report
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Thank you all for your advice will definitely weigh the back ski more.

For my education purpose, if I weigh my back ski more intuitively doesn't that mean the back ski will sink even more?
latest report
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Quote:
if I weigh my back ski more intuitively doesn't that mean the back ski will sink even more?

If you've got your weight distribution about 50/50 you should be "floating" on both skis, but should have control of the rear ski with pressure under-foot in the middle of the ski
snow conditions
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
euanovsky wrote:
Thank you all for your advice will definitely weigh the back ski more.

For my education purpose, if I weigh my back ski more intuitively doesn't that mean the back ski will sink even more?
not if you have your hel down and aren't dog-legging.
snow conditions
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
@ed123, in Powder you need to “feel like” you are putting 100% of you weight thru the back ski - in reality this will never be the case but it’s the sensation you need to seek.
ski holidays
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@ed123, in Powder you need to “feel like” you are putting 100% of you weight thru the back ski - in reality this will never be the case but it’s the sensation you need to seek.
ski holidays
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
Quote:

For my education purpose, if I weigh my back ski more intuitively doesn't that mean the back ski will sink even more?


No. Your back ski is sinking because you don't have sufficient control of it. You get control of it via the pressure under-foot, which needs weight on the ski
latest report
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
Quote:

When skiing in powder should I be weighting my back ski more? I find it rather difficult to turn in powder and more often than not the tip of my back ski dives into the snow. It might be down to me not having a solid stance on piste to start with...


Don't even think of the front ski !!

Monomarks on the piste help.

If you can find somewhere fluffy but not so steep as to require turns, try doing a tele-shuffle (i.e. lead change without a turn) down the fall line.. you can then concentrate on weight on skis rather than turning.
snow report
 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Charliee wrote:
@ed123, in Powder you need to “feel like” you are putting 100% of you weight thru the back ski - in reality this will never be the case but it’s the sensation you need to seek.


like this?

https://www.dropbox.com/s/sjf93rb232y2bz9/97319434_10158721597751614_7598929364427735040_o.jpg
latest report
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
@Rogerdodger, Thanks.

But not sure I can recall what I actually do now. It is now so natural, it just happens, but took a lot of just jumping in to the pow and trying. I did most of my learning on a black off piste deep snow area. Then I dropped in off the edge traversing in a solid tele stance. And then a vigorous turn.
As I can remember, my front ski is fairly light, with tip surfing through surface, from pics seems a ridiculous angle. I use/twist front knee turning to change the direction I am travelling. Ball of rear foot is well weighted and I use the rear ski as a brake, sliding left and right through the snow to scrub off speed as required like a rotary turn. A lot of unweighting for turns, possibly/almost pushing off clear of the snow with an in air lead change.
On piste, try doing tight small turns straight down a red run fall line and using the rear ski to slide/smear the snow to control speed, ie rotary turns. Pressure on the rear ski should be able push you physically round across the fall line, so ending up in a tele side slip. As opposed to staying on edge. A mogul/bumps field is good for this and it should feel like dancing down the bumps at a slow speed. A traverse across more than a couple of bumps is too much edge.
I think.
I'll have a practice when up in the next day or so and refresh my own ageing memory.
ski holidays
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@ed123, sorry missed this question. I'm using NTN. I think the problem is that I only have limited opportunities to tele in powder. This couples with the fact that perhaps my tele basic isn't too solid causes the issue.

ski wrote:

Don't even think of the front ski !!


Surely I still need to have my shin constantly pressed against my boot in the front ski? I found that by focusing on my back ski sometimes I don't press on the front ski as hard as I would in alpine skiing.
snow conditions
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Quote:


Surely I still need to have my shin constantly pressed against my boot in the front ski? I found that by focusing on my back ski sometimes I don't press on the front ski as hard as I would in alpine skiing


Compared to alpine skiing tele is much, much more two footed. It's a cliche, but tele (IMV) is all about the back ski. It needs to be right underneath you, so you can balance on it. The powder snow will do the job of pressurising the front ski for you, so you don't need too. This does not mean being on the backseat, rather it means being balanced on the back ski. Your back foot should be under you backside, not behind it.

On the piste are you able to make round, balanced turns on both sides? Do both skis follow the same path?


Last edited by Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see? on Mon 4-01-21 17:46; edited 1 time in total
ski holidays
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
ski wrote:


On the piste are you able to make round, balanced turns on both sides? Do both skis follow the same path?


I'd like to think that both skis follow the same path (and they do!). They are parallel in the telemark position/stance. I turn better on one side than the other though
ski holidays
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@euanovsky,
Quote:

I'd like to think that both skis follow the same path (and they do!). They are parallel in the telemark position/stance. I turn better on one side than the other though


Great! Very Happy

Back knee lower and further back than front knee?
snow report
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Quote:

I turn better on one side than the other though


So does everyone else! Laughing
snow conditions
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
ski wrote:
Back knee lower and further back than front knee?


Yes - how can back knee not be lower and further back than front knee in a tele stance? Puzzled
latest report
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Quote:

Yes - how can back knee not be lower and further back than front knee in a tele stance?


Sorry to ask --- but it's something a lot of beginning telemarkers do. So here's some things to practise

Monomarks. -- Turn without changing leads. Do this on both leads. Do it without poles on gentle slope

Try lifting the front ski off the ground at the end of a turn.

In the fluffy stuff --- somewhere where you can go straight down without worrying about speed. Start of in the fall line. Do a couple of lead changes without pole plants, then add the pole plant. Don't aim to turn. You will make very shallow turns. Add more turn, but keep in the fall line.

Hope that helps. Have fun Toofy Grin
latest report
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Even better. Exercise Telemark Titan 2022 8 - 20 January in Pralognan la Vanoise has been announced. The event to get the best possible instruction with top UK and FR instructors. There are posts on previous events on the trips section.
ski holidays
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Hi Colin,

Have you got a link for the Titan 2022?

Cheers
Nick
latest report
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
Quote:

Have you got a link for the Titan 2022?



It's posted on FB. More info will be here https://www.awsa.org.uk/disciplines/telemark/
snow conditions
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
This is the topic and info for 2020. Format and description will probably be exactly the same. Cost again should be £900 all in. Astonishing value.

https://snowheads.com/ski-forum/viewtopic.php?p=3411116&highlight=telemark+titan#3411116

Such a shame it was cancelled this year.
snow conditions
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
30cm of powder this morning, a bit heavy to start with but dried out during the day and got lighter. So refreshed my deep powder techniques. On a shallow slope, say blue, "walk" straight down the slope with the same motion as pavement walking. Feels well strange at first. Once walking straight, introduce shallow turns with gentle edge pressure.
On steeper slopes, pretty much as I wrote before. Front ski weighted more on heel to keep tip up and stop submarining. Front ski knee steering without edges, just like water skiing. Rear ski slipping side to side through snow to control speed. Vigorous jump turns to clear snow and lead change in air and stay a little lower. Too much pressure on rear ski can lead to it getting too far behind and legs cross over. Not good for next turn. Crash.
The only way though is just practise - fall - repeat - which I know at the moment is difficult.
snow conditions
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
And another thought. Elan Ripsticks with Amphibio rocker, more rocker on outside edge, seem to be brilliant for telemarking in powder as outside lead ski gives more lift into the turn.
snow report
 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Quote:
Too much pressure on rear ski can lead to it getting too far behind and legs cross over. Not good for next turn. Crash.

In my experience, skis crossing in this manner suggest being too much in the back seat (I know the feeling... Toofy Grin) : so try to keep your weight more centred on both feet.

Keep your stance shorter so that you can weight the rear ski, whilst keeping it more beneath you. As I suggested earlier: imagine keeping your rear heel closer to the floor (ie ski), rather than getting too tippy-toed.
latest report
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Quote:

Too much pressure on rear ski can lead to it getting too far behind and legs cross over.



Not sure about this.. if the back ski is to have pressure on it, it needs to be underneath you. Allen and Mike's Telemark Tips have a really good cartoon about this.

Quote:

Elan Ripsticks with Amphibio rocker



I tried some K2 Pinnacles with rocker a couple of years back -- rocker def helps Very Happy
snow conditions



Terms and conditions  Privacy Policy