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Any Telemark instructors looking?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
and want to give us a drill or two on how to improve our telemarking?? (video shot after about 10 days on telemark skis)

IOS Team Tele from InsideOutSkiing
https://vimeo.com/380439030

and after second lesson

Tele Scott from InsideOutSkiing
https://vimeo.com/312770578
snow conditions
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
I'm not an instructor, but have spent ~20 years practising. The first 2 things I'd suggest are:

1. You're not really weighting the rear ski, which is not unusual. To work on this, try any of the following, and try doing them quite forcefully (you can start when standing still, then when skiing):
- Pushing your rear knee down
- Flexing your rear ankle
- Push your shin against the front of the boot
2. Try and have a smooth transition between lead legs, so that it is one continuous movement. I'd also recommend you combine with a smooth weighting - unweighting. I'd practise this when going in a straight line first, and only later incorporating it into turns
snow conditions
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
I would agree with Viv,

There are some good videos out there, this one comes to the point above!

http://youtube.com/v/Oz5LVO2XFdQ
ski holidays
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
Agree with above

1) more weight on inner ski
2) more robust tele-stance (imagine pushing knee onto ski so thigh upto chest is a straight line).

Fwiw : you suffer from exact same tele-issue as me. There is an obvious "alpine pause". Basically you return to alpine stance at fall line then lunge into next Telemark turn after fall line. There is common in good alpine skiers as muscle memory takes you back to the safe (alpine) balance point between each turn.
latest report
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Merci all, some food for thought. I can really see the lack of rear pressure on the blue coat video (thought I was going to die more than a few times ) To be fair on the yellow jacket video my bindings weren't engaged correctly and only to toe pins were in.. felt really weird all day, I couldn't weight the rear ski at all and kept popping out of the bindings (like on the video) which I thought was just bad technique.. First time on Meidjo setup and turns out I had em in touring mode as hadn't pulled up the binders to engage the red flap. Didnt bother reading the manual rolling eyes rolling eyes and if you are thinking of Meidjos look from 3:00 onwards on how to engage correctly Wink
http://youtube.com/v/uO_ioeNsgno
ski holidays
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
I think you guys look really good. For sure better than the average tele skier I see on the pistes. Good balance and very graceful. I started in the mid-90s on straight Tua skis with superloop bindings. The equipment has changed over the past few decades, but the technique hasn't evolved that much.

I don't have much to add that hasn't been mentioned. The most useful tip for me was to bend my knee without moving my foot back too far. I more or less drop straight down. My foot stays under my bottom. This makes it feel like most of my weight is on my uphill ski, but actually it helps keep my weight balanced.

Carving more and dragging less is very challenging. A steeper slope and/or more speed helps. For me it also helps to face downhill as much as possible instead of turning your upper body left and right with the turn. This combined with engaging your edges through your feet puts your torso into a kind of C shape, which aids the skis in carving the turn.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@skimottaret, Snurfing is the drill for you. On a very easy slope, make a tele stance...and without changing leads make turns down the fall line (which is why it needs to be a very easy slope). Do this on both leads. You can't do this unless you are properly balanced on the back ski. The position you are aiming for is back thigh vertical, and back knee lower and further back than the front. If you want to meet at Hemel we can play at this together...
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