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Considering USA or Canada - recommendations/things we should know

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
VolklAttivaS5 wrote:
I'm off to Banff in February to try Canada out so will report back once I've been. Never been to the States or Canada before so that is why I thought Banff would be a good start.


Banff is great, as long as you don't mind the 25-45min bus ride to the skiing at Sunshine or Lake Louise...the scenery is very nice along the way.

The sense of empty wilderness is breathtaking...out the back of the ski areas, just mountains and nothingness as far as the eye can see.

Canadian hospitality is second to none, sooo friendly! You grow to like Poutine (chips with cheesy sauce & gravy). Interesting restaurants in Banff, exotic meats at Grizzly House, mouthwatering steaks at Saltlik, plate-smashing and belly dancing at the local Greek Taverna. You must do a full Canadian breakfast one day too.

If you can get a subsidised day trip out to Panorama or Kicking Horse, that would make for some diversity of slopes, again the scenery on the way is national park quality.

Night skiing with the local kids at Mt Norquay is fun, but wrap up warm.

If you're there for 10-14 days, consider hiring a car for a few days and doing some exploring, skating on a frozen Lake Louise is fun, a walk up Johnson Canyon to the frozen waterfalls likewise. Get some real isolation up the Icefelds Parkway to the Peyto Lake overlook, snowshoeing onto a frozen Bow Lake or some cross-country trails around Emerald Lake.

Husky sledding and snowmobiling are also available at a price.

Ultimately, skiing in the Alps makes the most sense for UK-based skiers, world class ski areas almost on the doorstep, but I don't regret tasting the Canadian experience.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Thank you so much for all your considered responses; they’re much appreciated.

I’m in a real quandary. It’s my OH who wants to go to Canada. If I’m honest I’d prefer the Alps as I can’t stand long haul. But it’s his dream so I’ll suck it up.

I’m thinking Canada as it’s closer and also looks beautiful. Having settled on Panorama I spotted Tremblant (even closer - result!!). However I then set about looking at snow depths and the latter seems to struggle; presumably because it is so “low lying”.

I prefer to DIY but it doesn’t look that easy because flights aren’t so plentiful.

Looking at Panorama it seems as though there’s not much to do except ski which is fine for a week but we plan on 2 so I may get a bit bored. The springs do look awesome though. Tremblant looks very pretty and I like to have a centre to visit, but the snow conditions are a concern.

So fed up of googling Very Happy
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The east of Canada (or the USA) is vastly different from the west. Travelling all that way to ride the snow of the east seems very odd. People from Eastern Canada come to the west for precisely the same reasons I come from Europe - because the snow is here, not there. You can ski in New York state, but it's not really a sensible place for people from Europe to travel to for skiing as it's not as good as Europe, and all you need to do is fly a few more hours to get to he west...

This is what's outside my window this afternoon. I don't know what they have in Quebec but it's not light and dry like this stuff, and they will have nothing like the snowfall. If you want to ice skate then maybe the east will work, but there's a reason all the resorts you hear people talk about are on the left hand side. It's not particularly altitude, it's that the Pacific is here on the left and that's where the weather comes from. The storms hit the coast (hence Whistler gets a lot of precip) and then the Rockies and the interior. The snow gets dryer as you move away from the coast, but you tend to get less of it. Quebec is a continent away, with a completely different climate. There are fewer ski resorts there because it's not so good for skiing.


Panorama for 2 weeks? Wow. Each to their own. I've never stayed more than a couple of days, there are lots of other small places to visit. But you'd probably enjoy Whistler or Banff significantly more.

--
Flights? There are lots of direct flights into Calgary and Vancouver each day. Tour operators will likely be cheaper, but offer less flexibility.
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As an intermediate you're going to ski most of the runs in panorama in 2 days I'd reckon. Unless you are willing to start heading into the glades etc. I've had some great days at Panorama but also some poor ones. Coming from Calgary it's a perfect weekend destination but coming from the other side of the pond I'd go for Banff as a base (and head to panorama if you feel like it for a few days).
Having said that it does have ski in and out accommodation so I can see the attraction.
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Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Thanks very much both (that’s an impressive photo philwig). Really useful what you say about panorama sweaman as that confirms what I thought. Looks like a longer flight it is then. Sad .

Ski in/out was very much an attraction for me but I’m guessing that’s less of a feature over West then? Banff looks nice but the 25 minute bus ride to the slopes is less appealing as I like to just get out and go.

Really useful too the explanation of snow formation over there. I’ve only crossed the pond once and that was to go to Disney and know nothing about Canada except that it’s beautiful.
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@bambionskiis, as intermediates who only go into the odd easy glade we love sun peaks. 2 flights though. Dog sledding was great. Plenty of restaurants

We liked Panorama but there is bug all there. Poor choice of restaurants. Not enough for intermediates for 2 weeks.

We also like Big White but again 2 flights but again crappy restaurant choice.

Yrembkant was very icy...real ice with death cookies everywhere

We had a great trip staying in Quebec City and going out to stoneham and Mont ste anne but that was a novelty.

Whistler....we should go back now we are better skiers

Banff...been 3 times. Enjoyed it and are happy with the bus ride. Caribou in the streets!

Fernie...Enjoyed it but we weren't good enough for it.

In the US only skied Breckenridge. Enjoyed it but prefer canada
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@bambionskiis,
Quote:

I’m in a real quandary. It’s my OH who wants to go to Canada. If I’m honest I’d prefer the Alps as I can’t stand long haul. But it’s his dream so I’ll suck it up.


Canada is a fantastic country to visit. We spent a month touring there a few years ago and barely scraped the surface of things to see and do. But that was in July.

I'd only go that far (and at that cost) to ski if it was much later in the season than Christmas. Also only if it was a minimum of 10 days, preferably 2 weeks. Then I'd probably only go to Whistler and incorporate it with a quick look around Vancouver, Victoria or other places that might be high on your list of things to see.

Similar in USA. I'd forget skiing near the east coast at that time of year. San Francisco/Lake Tahoe area. Denver/a couple of driveable Colorado areas. Much later than Christmas if you can.
snowHead
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After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
If you’re going to Banff you can stay a few nights at the Sunshine Mountain Lodge. Ski in, ski out right in the middle of the slopes at Sunshine Village.
The thing about the bus is that somehow it works! Don’t know how but it’s nowhere near as bad as you might think and it just becomes part of your day. Part of the appeal of Banff is that it’s a national park wilderness with strict restrictions on development
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bambionskiis wrote:

Ski in/out was very much an attraction for me but I’m guessing that’s less of a feature over West then? Banff looks nice but the 25 minute bus ride to the slopes is less appealing as I like to just get out and go.


Believe us, the bus ride is actually part of the fun. Have you read from people here who don’t like it? I’ve hardly seen any criticism from those who have actually done it. Let’s use the word “coach” as that’s what it is, not a shaky old bus. Going to Lake Louise (45min), you nurse a big coffee from the hotel and stare out from the motorway and look for wildlife. With jet lag you’ll be wide awake at 5am anyway, which means first bus and first tracks Smile

BUT could you push it to March? Warmer inland and more light in the evenings.
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@Orange200,
Quote:

Believe us, the bus ride is actually part of the fun.

Quote:

BUT could you push it to March? Warmer inland and more light in the evenings.


+1
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Thanks very much again folks. I’m coming round to Banff and yes the bus ride aspect was putting me off, but I’m basing that on say Austria where they’re tiny buses where you cram on so may be better than I thought, as you say. We are going for 14 days and because of kids college, work and other commitments we are stuck with Christmas.

I’ve got a low boredom threshold and like to go out and explore so I think in all Banff is going to hold my interest more. Whistler would be out of our price range. I’m a nervous intermediate so Mt Norquay would be where I’d spend most of my time and that’s the closest to Banff so another plus.
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And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
We did Banff at Christmas 3 years ago. Can't say we noticed anything that could seriously be described as a queue or a busy piste in our 8 days of action. It was f---ing cold at times though. Short days weren't a particular problem. Given the lack of queues etc. there was plenty of time for 5 hours of hard skiing each day, which left the four of us - all pretty fit due to one sport or another - ready for an early night each day. The town is great - food options to suit all budgets and plenty of options for non-skiing activities.

We did Tremblant at Half Term last year. That was pretty good too, though you have to like repeating runs as there aren't really that many and none are particularly long. The town is a bit too touristy for my liking, but for a week it was bearable and the food options were again pleasingly varied.

Both places had terrain to suit all abilities. Some of the Double Blacks at Sunshine give me the heeby jeebies even now at the thought of them, and I only saw them from the lifts/bus! Tremblant had some equally scary terrain but not as much. I'm not a very good / adventurous skier and enjoyed the "thrill" of "off piste" within the patrolled area, knowing that if things went wrong, I'd get rescued without censure or a large bill!
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bambionskiis wrote:
Thanks very much again folks. I’m coming round to Banff and yes the bus ride aspect was putting me off, but I’m basing that on say Austria where they’re tiny buses where you cram on so may be better than I thought, as you say. We are going for 14 days and because of kids college, work and other commitments we are stuck with Christmas.

I’ve got a low boredom threshold and like to go out and explore so I think in all Banff is going to hold my interest more. Whistler would be out of our price range. I’m a nervous intermediate so Mt Norquay would be where I’d spend most of my time and that’s the closest to Banff so another plus.


European buses are designed for short trips with plenty of standing. The Banff buses are similar to a UK coach, all seated.
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@bambionskiis, they are comfortable coaches and skis go in the luggage compartment.

Isnt norquay the most difficult mountain? It's certainly the smallest....I can't see there being enough for you. I've never been in 3 trips. Get thee to sunshine
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The Flying Snowplough wrote:
We did Banff at Christmas 3 years ago. Can't say we noticed anything that could seriously be described as a queue or a busy piste in our 8 days of action. It was f---ing cold at times though.


I used to scoff at this, partly as I was younger and partly as I was better dressed. After having worked two winters in Mongolia and another two in Moscow, I’d go out with thermal leggings, fleece jogging bottoms (Karrimor) and quilted salopettes, torso similarly attired, and thought the Canadian instructor was a bit of a wuss when one cold morning he said the group would be staying in the trees. Since then I bought some Rossignol trousers (after salopettes I called them race pants, probably not) and just wore them with thermal leggings. Last year I was there I got frozen off the mountain for most of the morning, had to shelter in a cafe for an hour to defrost. Balaclava under the helmet helped too.
That risks being the biggest problem.
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 Poster: A snowHead
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@bambionskiis, Panorama is so lovely that I once went there for three consecutive years. I'd happily spend two weeks there, but I'm not sure it's for you: the transfer is stunningly beautiful but very long (at least four hours), there's absolutely nothing to do there apart from ski and visit the hot springs, and it's pretty limited for a nervous intermediate. On the other hand, if you want to tackle your nerves by taking some lessons and/or pushing your boundaries slightly, it's ideal. It has a fairly decent amount of 'interesting' terrain that an intermediate can access - places like the Sun Bowl and Founders Ridge allow you to venture off the piste and enjoy some natural terrain that isn't frighteningly steep. But the really fun parts of Panorama - the Taynton Bowl and the Extreme Dream Zone - are likely to be remain inaccessible to you as they are definitely not suitable for nervous skiers.

Like others, I wouldn't recommend going to Tremblent. The snow and resort extent don't really justify the hourney.

I'm not familiar with Banff but, from what I've read, it sounds ideal for you. You mention cost, so another wildcard for you to consider would be Jackson Hole. When I price-up DIY trips to North America, Jackson is always one of the cheapest: it's often possible to get incredibly cheap hotel deals in the town as winter is low season for the tourist trade due to its proximity to Yellowstone, and you have a decent range of budget eateries. Despite its reputation for gnarly skiing, they have invested heavily in intermediate runs in recent years so you wouldn't get bored or feel intimidated. Jackson is a real town with a great selection of shops and restaurants, and you can always arrange a day trip to Yellowstone - my winter visit there was one of the most memorable days of my life. Grand Targhee is also an easy day trip and offers plenty more intermediate skiing. Although there are no direct flights from the UK, the airport is incredibly close to the town; with transfers taking less than 30 minutes, your overall journey time isn't much worse than some other resorts. If you do look at Jackson, I would definitely recommend staying in the town rather than on the mountain: it's far cheaper, the atmosphere is much better, and the bus ride or drive in the morning is very straightforward.
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Quote:
I’m a nervous intermediate so Mt Norquay would be where I’d spend most of my time


I don't see the point of coming all the way out to Canada just to ski Norquay.

It sounds like the skiing is not the priority? In which case have you considered Vancouver? Great city with lots to do and a couple of small ski hills in the area. From van you could also go up to whistler for a few days (I know you said a whole trip there would be out your budget, but a few days might be possible).

Or alternatively ski in the Alps and visit Canada for a summer trip.


I'm not really sure Jackson hole is a great suggestion for a nervous intermediate.
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A nervous intermediate doesn't need to be stuck to Norquay at all. In fact I think its not great for that or beginners, apart from total beginners. Sunshine and Lake Louise have loads of long, wide green and blue runs, plenty to keep an intermediate happy with some of the best views in the world. Norquay is great for a first day warm up, a stormy day (its all tree lined), night skiing or a lazier mid trip day. Its really good fun and very close to Banff but you'll ski all the greens and easy blues in a few hours.
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Quote:

Sunshine and Lake Louise have loads of long, wide green and blue runs, plenty to keep an intermediate happy with some of the best views in the world.


Agree. But would you fly half way across the world and spend £75 per day for a liftpass to sunshine or LL, when you have that terrain and views next door already in europe?
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Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
As above - you're not going to do more than a day or so at Norquay.

At lot of this comes down to why are you going to Canada (OH wants it?) and what type of skiing do you enjoy?

If, as an intermediate, what you really enjoy is cruising around a mountain visiting different places each day and exploring then it's possible nothing in Canada (except perhaps Whistler) offers what you are after. The resorts (even Lake Louise) are much smaller and you're going to end up skiing the same stuff especially if you're there for 2 weeks. Not ideal for someone with a "low boredom threshold". If I find a run I like (good conditions, decent pitch etc) then I'll happily run multiple laps on it and that's the Canadian way.
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sweaman22 wrote:

If, as an intermediate, what you really enjoy is cruising around a mountain visiting different places each day and exploring then it's possible nothing in Canada (except perhaps Whistler) offers what you are after.

A road trip might, though. Personally I've never done a road trip as I find that the better I know a resort, the more I enjoy it. But it's a perfectly credible way to see and ski lots of different places.
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boarder2020 wrote:

I'm not really sure Jackson hole is a great suggestion for a nervous intermediate.

Have you been there recently? They've made big changes to the lift system over the past decade and you can now enjoy days doing endless laps of cruisy blues on fast quad chairs. The resort has a clear focus on attracting intermediate skiers and the existence of tough stuff elsewhere doesn't make the blues any harder or less extensive. One particularly good feature of Jackson for families is that in many parts of the mountain a nervous skier can take the cruisy blue while an adventurous teenager can divert momentarily through the trees or cliffs. That way everyone in the family gets to enjoy themselves.

Reputation doesn't always reflect reality.
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bambionskiis wrote:
Thanks very much again folks. I’m coming round to Banff and yes the bus ride aspect was putting me off, but I’m basing that on say Austria where they’re tiny buses where you cram on so may be better than I thought, as you say. We are going for 14 days and because of kids college, work and other commitments we are stuck with Christmas.

I’ve got a low boredom threshold and like to go out and explore so I think in all Banff is going to hold my interest more. Whistler would be out of our price range. I’m a nervous intermediate so Mt Norquay would be where I’d spend most of my time and that’s the closest to Banff so another plus.


As others have said, the buses are punctual, very comfortable, everyone gets a seat, if the bus fills up they call another one which arrives in minutes, skis go underneath.

There's plenty of easy terrain at Sunshine & Lake Louise, and resort volunteers that welcome you and can point you to runs that suit your ability. Norquay is probably best reserved for the night ski though you could spend a day up repeating the same runs.

My advice about Banff was in answer to VolklAttiva who was going in February. As you are talking Christmas, you do have to be aware that Banff can get very cold in midwinter, usually January, but either side too, it can hit -35C, which makes any outdoor activities nigh on impossible. Best time to go is March.
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Quote:

run multiple laps on it and that's the Canadian way.


The Canadian way is getting off the groomers as much as possible wink

Quote:

over the past decade and you can now enjoy days doing endless laps of cruisy blues on fast quad chairs. The resort has a clear focus on attracting intermediate skiers and the existence of tough stuff elsewhere doesn't make the blues any harder or less extensive


I'm sure there is now more for intermediates. However there are plenty of better resort options. Plus, the OP has mentioned budget is an issue, no point paying Jackson hole lift ticket prices to use a fraction of the mountain.

Quote:


At lot of this comes down to why are you going to Canada (OH wants it?) and what type of skiing do you enjoy?



This is the key question which has still not really been answered. Is the skiing even the main priority or is it a holiday with a bit of skiing thrown in?
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Wife reminded me; the free guides are awesome too. Turn up, choose your level, follow a guided group for two hours. No charge. Fantastic way to see the place.
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boarder2020 wrote:

...
I'm sure there is now more for intermediates. However there are plenty of better resort options. Plus, the OP has mentioned budget is an issue, no point paying Jackson hole lift ticket prices to use a fraction of the mountain.
...

Jackson lift prices are usually no more expensive than Lake Louise area passes. rolling eyes

And did you notice the bit where I recommended Jackson because it's cheap?
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Jackson day pass is around $150(us) lake Louise around $95(us), so a fair difference. Not that I think either is good value for a nervous intermediate who is not going to take full advantage of the terrain.

Cheap is a relative term. Personally I don't think of Jackson as cheap, but it depends on your point of view and what you are comparing it to.

Also OP has already mentioned short flight time, Jackson adds a second flight or a long drive, and that their OH wants to go to canada.
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For what the OP is asking about for North America resorts.

Things to consider: Lift passes are expensive in all North America ski resorts, unless you buy an Epic Pass, Mountain Collective Pass or Ikon Pass. So, you will need to decide on where you want to ski, and then buy one of those passes. Those passes will offer lodging discounts. Although during peak holiday times, probably not much of a discount, other than maybe a few percent off by booking early.

Two: Ease of getting to the slopes from the airport. Salt Lake City (SLC). No contest. 45 minutes from the airport. That gives you access to Park City and the Canyons with the Epic Pass. Town is nice, and there are cruiser runs to be had. Deer Valley is just up the road but on the Ikon Pass. Nice chalky dry groomers when conditions are right. And if they get a nice dusting of light powder, who knows you might find that intermediate groomers is no longer your thing! wink

Denver is another option. You are going to be just over 2.5 hours drive to Vail Resorts of Breckenridge, Keystone, Vail, Beaver Creek. (Epic Pass) All have cruisers, and if you have a car, you can explore them very easily. Breck has a nice town, and feel to it. Would be a good place to explore if you like slope side accommodations.

Calgary: As others have said has Banff/Lake Louise. Not overly crowded. Good intermediate terrain. Outside the town of Banff itself, not much going on. The scenery is beautiful though. Maybe the exchange rate a bit better. Mountain Collective and Ikon Pass are options.

Snow Quality - Sound like groomer city, so no big deal if there's powder to be had. Groomers are definitely a plenty at Breck, Vail, Beaver Creek. You will find the same for Park City ski areas too.

If going at Christmas/New Years is the time frame that you want to go, you already know it will be expensive and crowded. Of all the places I've mentioned, Banff/Lake Louise would be the better of the choices for crowds. And probably price wise as well. Whistler will be very crowded and very expensive at that time. So will the Summit County resorts in Colorado.
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@boarder2020, I really can't be bothered with this any more, but bambionskiis wants to ski for two weeks, not one day, so day pass prices are irrelevant. What matters for an early booker on a two week trip is the cost of a season pass (or the Ikon pass for Jackson). And the title of the thread suggests that the USA meets her OH's aspirations.

bambionskiis, there's a great deal of solid, fact-based advice in Toadman's post - well worth a close read.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
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bambionskiis wrote:
Thanks very much again folks. I’m coming round to Banff and yes the bus ride aspect was putting me off, but I’m basing that on say Austria where they’re tiny buses where you cram on so may be better than I thought, as you say. We are going for 14 days and because of kids college, work and other commitments we are stuck with Christmas.

I’ve got a low boredom threshold and like to go out and explore so I think in all Banff is going to hold my interest more. Whistler would be out of our price range. I’m a nervous intermediate so Mt Norquay would be where I’d spend most of my time and that’s the closest to Banff so another plus.


I've been to Banff a couple of times.

As others have said the busses ore not a problem. I board/ski solo, so have met a number of daily ski bodies on the bus on the way, a bonus for me.

Restaurant selection is good. I was last there about four years ago, and the range was from soup and a sandwich cheapie (Evelyns were good), through veggie goodness (Nourish), some really nice share plate/tapas (Block - highly recommended) to the ubiquitous steak at the Saltlick.

Non skiing activities? In one of the small shopping mall in town there was a company called Banff Adventures and they had a wide range of activities, SWMBO used then a good bit and had nothing but praise for them.

As Far as DIY goes, we flew with Air Canada, who were ok. Transfer bus with Banff Airporter, who were excellent, really nice 'luxury' minibus, called at hotel reception and asked for you by name at pickup etc. Book hotel direct, we stayed in the Caribou lodge and when they recognise you they do a good deal and you get the 'nicer' rooms than the TO masses. As others have said hunt for deals on lift passes.
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rogg wrote:

As Far as DIY goes, we flew with Air Canada, who were ok.

BA no longer operate winter flights to Calgary, so Air Canada is the only option for a direct flight. That's unfortunate as the reduction in competition seems to have pushed up prices. We are flying to Calgary with KLM via Amsterdam in February, partly for the convenience of using regional airports but mainly because Air Canada's pricing was extortionate.
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@Jonny Jones, thanks that explains why the flights we had to Calgary went.
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Westjet fly LGW to YYC
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My experience of North America vs Europe skiing is v similar to Toadman's above, so definitely worth a read of that. We have tried Breck, Banff, Whistler and Killington.

Just to highlight two things. My family of 4 are usually limited to 7 days skiing at February due to two school age kids and a partner who works in education. We still reckon it's worth a trans-atlantic trip for that week, because it just feels like a bigger adventure. I love the Alps and will always return there, but the whole change in culture, different skiing conditions, different scenery still makes US or Canada trips appealing.

We always hire a big SUV and make the transfer part of the trip. This works particularly well in Banff. The drive from Calgary is very easy. Once we were in Banff, we loved not being dependant on the coach to get to the slopes. I have done the coach from Banff to both Sunshine and Lake Louise and it's fine, but having the car was marginally better for us. As others have posted, the 'commute' to the slopes becomes part of the routine. Not better, not worse, just different.
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Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Another vote for Canada and I think Banff could be good for you.

My husband and I are intermediates and the in-bound skiing, meaning that you can pick the groomed stuff, the just-off-the-side stuff or a line through powder but with the security of knowing its still patrolled is a joy - it has improved our skiing significantly and its fun to challenge yourself in a safe way.
You don't necessarily get the sense of "travel" on the slopes in Canada, all routes lead back to the same few places which takes some getting used to but you can choose different lines every time so its definitely not boring.

The bus rides put me off Banff initially but I'm so glad we went for it anyway - grab a coffee before you board the very comfortable bus and appreciate the incredible journey - on the way back, you can sleep or more likely, rave about your day!

Going long-haul is a mindset you have to get into but all part of the adventure - the jet lag works in your favour on the way out - up and out early onto the slopes. We've done a couple of 7 day trips (and a couple of longer trips) and I wouldn't hesitate to do it again.

Crystal often do deals which are hard to beat DIY costs.
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Quote:

We are flying to Calgary with KLM via Amsterdam in February, partly for the convenience of using regional airports

Jonny Jones, We're doing the same, Feb too Toofy Grin Usually use AMS for Canada or the US, so convenient and direct from AMS.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
We went via AMS last time. If you are not used to them, be prepared for the auto weigh check in machines; unlike humans you can’t get away with just one extra kilo!
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Orange200, LOL, you forget from the UK, luggage checked through - so we don't encounter them Madeye-Smiley
So cant you just support one end of the bag slightly wink like say a ski bag - thought everyone rests it on their knee/shin Toofy Grin
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@bambionskiis,
I wasn't sure Canada was worth the time and money over Europe until I went. We've done two week trips organised by skisafari, who I totally recommend. TBH we could have organised ourselves at less cost which we will do next time.

Don't get hung up on ski in-ski out like I did/do in Europe, it's different there.

But, for an intermediate I reckon you'll love it. Do a week in Fernie with the last week in Banff. That will give you a real experience holiday.

Hire a car. It's great driving to both resorts, so unlike anything in Europe. (I spy with my little eye, something beginning with "T")

It's great having lessons in your own language from a native speaker, a real eye opener which I now insist on wherever I go.

Overall, my skiing has improved massively every time I've gone to Canada, because I've been sliding for 2 weeks, or because there are just no lift queues of the pistes are empty? (Except for a powder day of course! Toofy Grin snowHead )
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Banff is great for the overall experience.

I've been 3 times and if I won the lottery I'd go again (10-14 day trip), and that's despite the fact that European resorts beat it in so many ways.

Find a hotel less than 10 mins walk from the centre (or stay in the Banff Springs hotel).
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