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Edge tuning angles + files

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
I think the bit in this thread your missing is the ski or board steel edge heats on rock/stone impact and case hardens locally in that very small edge area when actually skiing snowboarding .
Making tools by hand is a valid point but its not skiing and getting stone nicks or alot of heavy stone damage .

A file wont touch this isolated damaged area you have to stone the case hardened area .
If you bang away with a file on enough stone damage it messes the file up.

This is no big deal on the side edge using a stone first thats easy enough but the base edge is alot more differcult or rather... time consuming using hand tools diy with stone damage and case hardening .
snow report     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@Gustavobs, The cardboard around the skis to catch the wax and the metal filings is genius!!!!

You deserve and IG Nobel Prize Razz
snow conditions     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Tirol 164 wrote:
I think the bit in this thread your missing is the ski or board steel edge heats on rock/stone impact and case hardens locally in that very small edge area when actually skiing snowboarding .
Making tools by hand is a valid point but its not skiing and getting stone nicks or alot of heavy stone damage .

A file wont touch this isolated damaged area you have to stone the case hardened area .
If you bang away with a file on enough stone damage it messes the file up.

This is no big deal on the side edge using a stone first thats easy enough but the base edge is alot more differcult or rather... time consuming using hand tools diy with stone damage and case hardening .


It has been mentioned in this thread and its its simple, you just use an alu oxide stone which is sacrificial - then use the diamond stones
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Fish head
Yes we know that.....although it wasnt the point being made .

My reply is to ski3 where I think our wires have crossed on the term "case hardening" which I use rightly or probably wrongly to describe a steel edge once its hit stone .

My other mistake may have been saying "carbon" steel edges as they are probably not med carbon steel perhaps low carbon .
Either way .
Once the rock damage happens in practise the localised stone damaged area becomes hardened to file use .

You can call this hardening process whatever you like (i termed it case hardened or like case hardened) so you need the stone as you correctly say .
snow report     
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Tirol 164 wrote:
I think the bit in this thread your missing is the ski or board steel edge heats on rock/stone impact and case hardens locally in that very small edge area when actually skiing snowboarding .
Making tools by hand is a valid point but its not skiing and getting stone nicks or alot of heavy stone damage .

A file wont touch this isolated damaged area you have to stone the case hardened area .
If you bang away with a file on enough stone damage it messes the file up.

This is no big deal on the side edge using a stone first thats easy enough but the base edge is alot more differcult or rather... time consuming using hand tools diy with stone damage and case hardening .


If it causes, through discussion, to take an approach that's not needed, then how can that be helpful.

Case hardening is a very well described and documented procedure that is not present here in these materials. I'd not make a comment of any tools supplied, either for or against their quality that I've not used, but Toko files that I do use have no difficultly in cutting ski edges in the condition you describe. It's just not a problem, that may be because of their, Toko, quality and specifications, but it's untrue to say they are not appropriate.
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Second photo second paragraph is what I refer too when using the words case hardening in relation to working stone damage by hand.
https://www.thepisteoffice.com/index.php/tuning-guide/4-side-edge-tuning.html

It is essential to first stone down any side edge damage with a alu-oxide stone as the impacts with rocks etc case hardens the edge so that a file can’t touch it.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
I ran out of time to call Jon today, but was motivated by the possibility of a last min ski trip this weekend to get a an order in asap.

I re-built my original basket based on the comments and advice on here and my online research to date. Here’s what I went for; all items are from Toko:

Workbench tools:
- Ski vise race
- Brake stopper bands

Edge tools:
- Grinding rubber (gummi stone)
- Universal edge grinder (alu oxide stone)
- Edge tuner pro (with metal file)
- Blue 325 grit course diamond file
- Red 600 grit fine diamond file

Waxing tools:
- T8 800w wax iron
- Graphite repair candles
- All-in-one wax (0 to -30 degrees)
- Steel scraper blade
- Plexi scraper (150x53x5)
- Scraper sharpener world cup
- Multi-purpose scraper
- Copper brush
- Nylon brush
- Horsehair brush

All this came in at £323.35 (including P&P), which will take quite a few services to break even on. But that does include a well reviewed Toko vise and iron and half of this is the convenience, fun and satisfaction of doing the job myself. And I plan to be skiing for decades to come, so the “investment” should pay back eventually!

In the unlikely event that I do some future damage to my base edges which can’t be fixed with a light freehand pass of gummi stone or fine file, I may consider investing in the Toko multi base angle guide. This is really expensive vs the Kunzmann in the Piste Office’s advanced kit, but can be used with the Toko diamond files I’ve purchased.

And, if I don’t get on with the Edge tuner pro, I may upgrade to a 87 degree Toko fixed edge guide and clamp later down the line. In the interim, I thought it would be useful to have the option of edge tuning at different angles, just in case the Sharpie test shows that my Blizzard skis don’t have the 87 degree edges they report to.

A big thank you again for all the help. I’m looking forward to getting to grips with all this gear!

Cheers,

Phil
ski holidays     
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@R1DSO, it would have been nice to have had the opportunity of quoting against your requirements as my prices are competitive with those but for higher spec items - & that's without me doing you a package deal. I would have also advised you not to buy certain items and there's a couple of things that you do need that aren't on your list. Plus you'd get the support of a UK retailer who's on the end of the phone from 9am to 9pm 7 days week when you need assistance.
snow conditions     
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
spyderjon wrote:
@R1DSO, it would have been nice to have had the opportunity of quoting against your requirements as my prices are competitive with those but for higher spec items - & that's without me doing you a package deal. I would have also advised you not to buy certain items and there's a couple of things that you do need that aren't on your list. Plus you'd get the support of a UK retailer who's on the end of the phone from 9am to 9pm 7 days week when you need assistance.


We tried Jon - he can always call up SnowInn for tuning advice rolling eyes Madeye-Smiley
snow report     
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
R1DSO wrote:
I ran out of time to call Jon today, but was motivated by the possibility of a last min ski trip this weekend to get a an order in asap.

I re-built my original basket based on the comments and advice on here and my online research to date. Here’s what I went for; all items are from Toko:

Workbench tools:
- Ski vise race
- Brake stopper bands

Edge tools:
- Grinding rubber (gummi stone)
- Universal edge grinder (alu oxide stone)
- Edge tuner pro (with metal file)
- Blue 325 grit course diamond file
- Red 600 grit fine diamond file

Waxing tools:
- T8 800w wax iron
- Graphite repair candles
- All-in-one wax (0 to -30 degrees)
- Steel scraper blade
- Plexi scraper (150x53x5)
- Scraper sharpener world cup
- Multi-purpose scraper
- Copper brush
- Nylon brush
- Horsehair brush

All this came in at £323.35 (including P&P), which will take quite a few services to break even on. But that does include a well reviewed Toko vise and iron and half of this is the convenience, fun and satisfaction of doing the job myself. And I plan to be skiing for decades to come, so the “investment” should pay back eventually!

In the unlikely event that I do some future damage to my base edges which can’t be fixed with a light freehand pass of gummi stone or fine file, I may consider investing in the Toko multi base angle guide. This is really expensive vs the Kunzmann in the Piste Office’s advanced kit, but can be used with the Toko diamond files I’ve purchased.

And, if I don’t get on with the Edge tuner pro, I may upgrade to a 87 degree Toko fixed edge guide and clamp later down the line. In the interim, I thought it would be useful to have the option of edge tuning at different angles, just in case the Sharpie test shows that my Blizzard skis don’t have the 87 degree edges they report to.

A big thank you again for all the help. I’m looking forward to getting to grips with all this gear!

Cheers,

Phil



Phil

Enjoy your new tuning gear and if you have any queries ask away, the forum is a wealth of info
snow report     
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
Tuning is good fun. Keep finding new toys to buy.

Tognar has lots of cool stuff. The p tex soldering iron they sell is really useful. I’ll be getting some roto brushes next season.

I do base grinds by hand using the ski visions tool. Flattened one board at the start of winter that was really convex and took it over to the local shop to see what the repair guy thought, and he was pretty impressed. Doesn’t have a uniform structure like a machine finish but seems to go alright. Does take ages to do and need to be careful with it though

He offered me a part time job. Was quite tempted to spend my weekend evenings hanging out with a load of teenagers getting stoned hammering rental skis through the base grinding machine Happy
snow report     
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@R1DSO, 4 scrapers, 3 brushes?
ski holidays     
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
Fish_Head wrote:
....We tried Jon - he can always call up SnowInn for tuning advice rolling eyes Madeye-Smiley

It's appreciated thanks.

If he's buying from Snowinn it'll be a miracle if he gets his order before Christmas, if at all.
ski holidays     
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
I'm also newbie in tuning - just a quick question that will be relevant to Phil as well...

How much do you need to file your edges and how to know if done enough?

I did recently my first attempt and I probably took way too much edge off, not a massive deal since the ski is not far from retirement anyway, but when I buy a new one I don't want to give a chance to reduce its lifespan
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Gustavobs wrote:
How much do you need to file your edges and how to know if done enough?

Depends how blunt they are.

After a weeks skiing I make a 2/3 passes with a file and 2/3 with a 600 grit diamond file.

Feel before and after. Should feel smooth.

If you run a cloth down should be no snags. Some people mark it with a felt pen and check it's gone.
ski holidays     
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Layne wrote:
Gustavobs wrote:
How much do you need to file your edges and how to know if done enough?

Depends how blunt they are.

After a weeks skiing I make a 2/3 passes with a file and 2/3 with a 600 grit diamond file.

Feel before and after. Should feel smooth.

If you run a cloth down should be no snags. Some people mark it with a felt pen and check it's gone.


In my case, I was changing the edge angle from 89 to 88. Although I could see some swarf I had no idea if the new angle was already set properly, so I done few more times.... rolling eyes

I might try the pen trick next time.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
There's is only one way to determine if you've filed enough that is you need to file enough to raise a slight hanging burr which will hang down from the side edge angle over the base edge angle.

Most people don't file enough. If you don't raise a hanging burr then the edge is still blunt, ie rounded to a lesser or greater extent, but still rounded nevertheless.

And if the edge isn't to bad then a hanging burr can be raised by just using a diamond file(s).

This is how to feel for a hanging burr: Assuming that the ski base is facing away from you - which it should be - then if you pull your hand gently towards you across the edge you'll feel when the hangig burr has been raised. It doesn't need to be big (ie not big enough to catch your fingernail on) but it will feel rough/scratchy. To help feel the difference you can push you hand across the side edge away from you as that will remind you what smooth is.

Once you can just feel the hanging burr then it's time to stop filing and on with the remaining steps to finish the edge, ie diamond file(s) to side edge, smoother diamond down the base edge angle to remove the hanging burr and then a very gentle pass at 45 degrees to the junction of the base edge & side edge to ensure that the hanging burr is fully removed.
snow report     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
The pen trick is great for angle determination and when changing the side edge angle however just because all the pen has gone it doesn't mean that the edge us sharp so you still need to continue until you raise the hanging burr.
ski holidays     
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spyderjon wrote:
There's is only one way to determine if you've filed enough that is you need to file enough to raise a slight hanging burr which will hang down from the side edge angle over the base edge angle.

Most people don't file enough. If you don't raise a hanging burr then the edge is still blunt, ie rounded to a lesser or greater extent, but still rounded nevertheless.

And if the edge isn't to bad then a hanging burr can be raised by just using a diamond file(s).

This is how to feel for a hanging burr: Assuming that the ski base is facing away from you - which it should be - then if you pull your hand gently towards you across the edge you'll feel when the hangig burr has been raised. It doesn't need to be big (ie not big enough to catch your fingernail on) but it will feel rough/scratchy. To help feel the difference you can push you hand across the side edge away from you as that will remind you what smooth is.

Once you can just feel the hanging burr then it's time to stop filing and on with the remaining steps to finish the edge, ie diamond file(s) to side edge, smoother diamond down the base edge angle to remove the hanging burr and then a very gentle pass at 45 degrees to the junction of the base edge & side edge to ensure that the hanging burr is fully removed.



Thanks Jon I will print that and put in my tuning box Smile

Out of curiosity found this video of microscope capture of the hanging burr


http://youtube.com/v/ioV7BmV0tRg
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
spyderjon wrote:
@R1DSO, it would have been nice to have had the opportunity of quoting against your requirements as my prices are competitive with those but for higher spec items - & that's without me doing you a package deal. I would have also advised you not to buy certain items and there's a couple of things that you do need that aren't on your list. Plus you'd get the support of a UK retailer who's on the end of the phone from 9am to 9pm 7 days week when you need assistance.


Sorry Jon. I would have liked to give you a buzz, but ran out of time to during normal business hours. I needed to rush an order through that evening so I could receive the gear and service my skis before the weekend.

Snowinn gave me a delivery slot of this Friday. I’ll be annoyed if they don’t come through on that, although, unfortunately, the last min ski break this weekend is now not going ahead.

Hopefully the stuff I’ve ordered is still decent kit coming from Toko! Out of interest, what am I missing? I thought I’d compiled a fairly comprehensive list.
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@R1DSO, if you'd have looked at my website you'd have seen that my phone is on from 9am to 9pm 7 days a week - so customers can do exactly what you wanted to do. And you'd have been receiving your order from me today.

Snowinn are Spanish and their service record is dire. If they were in the UK then Trading Standards would be all over them for taking orders that they know they can't fulfill. I hope you paid by credit card. Many customers never get their order. AFAIK they've never ripped anyone off and everyone has had a refund but they've had your money for a few weeks. Do a search on this forum and you see.
ski holidays     
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@spyderjon I got to my order late into the evening outside of your (albeit generously long) opening hours.

It was mentioned earlier in this thread that both Toko and Snowinn were reputable, however I did indeed pay by credit card, as I do with all online orders.

If Snowinn have issues with fulfilment, I’ll get a refund and give you a call.
snow report     
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@R1DSO, no worries but my online store also takes order 24/7. And there's nowt wrong with Toko stuff, it's just often pricey for its spec as many of their items are rebadged from other manufacturers (ie LG Kunzmann & Skiman) so I go straight to the original source even though I have an excellent relationship with the UK Toko supplier on their other brands. You are getting good prices for the Toko stuff from Snowinn. Hopefully your order will come though fast enough for you but I'll be pleased to supply you if they don't - and I'll re-spec some of the items for you in the process.


Last edited by After all it is free Go on u know u want to! on Fri 6-12-19 0:26; edited 1 time in total
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
I just sharpened both of our SL skis, fairly straight forward. Finished on a 1500 grit diamond (Moonflex from Jon) to be really anal Toofy Grin

I then took a look at my 11 year old Nordica Enforcer rock hoppers and tourers which were really blunt. Dear god, I had to take a fair bit of metal off plus cut back the side wall to return my 87 edge. It does take a little time to get a ski that ill treated back to a uniform sharp edge without taking too much off the edge thickness. It will be well worth it though, once I finish tomorrow.
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Tirol 164 wrote:
Second photo second paragraph is what I refer too when using the words case hardening in relation to working stone damage by hand.
https://www.thepisteoffice.com/index.php/tuning-guide/4-side-edge-tuning.html

It is essential to first stone down any side edge damage with a alu-oxide stone as the impacts with rocks etc case hardens the edge so that a file can’t touch it.


I'd certainly not contest the good advice from jon regarding ski preparation etc, but believe there's certainly discussion / debate about the metallurgy involved.

Perhaps it's general terminology within ski environment to use "case hardening " in description but with steel products it defines very specific process to achieve it.

I'd not want to put jon on the spot regarding it, maybe the ski manufacturers offer empirical data to support that definition of which I'm not privy to. The exact metallurgy is difficult to find in public scorces, with any discussion reliant on existing information from general metallurgy.

Ordinarily, the steel used would have a heat treatable alloy that's not capable of getting too hard to prevent ultimately, fracture occurring in use. In other words the alloy specification would allow adequate hardness with a ductility suitable for the level of flexing a ski experienced during use. You'd have to add more carbon as far as I can see to get a case hardening response. It would stay sharper during use but be more brittle, hence the choice of material in the alloy mix to weave a line between the two characteristic needed for serviceable life.

I've no doubt it may be a good course of action to dress off clearly damaged areas with suitable abrasive first and prior to further work. Nothing wrong with that advice.

Anecdotally, I've always just used a file though, perhaps at higher pressure that many try, with it always removing any damaged edge without consequential compromise to tool or ski.

After all if a rock is capable of changing the material's structure, then so would a grinding edge tool as it's effectively the same process with attendant heat produced at the work site.

The alloy is chosen specifically to avoid a further hardening response in use and servicing operations. The principal routes back from to high a hardening condition is to aneal / temper which as a process lies completely outside, in temperature range, that any ski could tolerate.

The oranges sparks emitted during edge grinding demonstrate that, locally at least, the material is reaching temperature close to 3,400 degree centigrade. It has to be able to resist this without changing its hardness state to make routine servicing possible.
snow conditions     
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
Try your toko files on the shovel your digging a hole with .
snow conditions     
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Tirol 164 wrote:
Try your toko files on the shovel your digging a hole with .


And you feel that it's not possible to participate in reasonable debate with factual information.

Perhaps it's you that needs a shovel to build a foundation for your inferiority complex. Very Happy
ski holidays     
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
The very localised hardened burrs raised by skiing on ice or rock dings are caused by 'work hardening'. Their hardening is easy to test, just a run a file over them compared to filing on a burr free section of side edge. The file skids across the burr and gives a shrill/zingy sound compared to the sound the file makes when used on a burr free edge.
snow report     
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
Yes, in metal manufacturing 'case hardening' is a specific term when used within the industry. As sj put it, perhaps 'work hardening' is a more accurate term when applied to skis.
snow conditions     
 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Following up on this thread having finally now edge tuned and waxed my skis and tested them at the snow dome ahead of a forthcoming week in The 3 Valleys.

Here’s my equipment setup. I’m using an old B&D Workmate for now, but need to sort a better solution in the longer run. The low height is doing no favours for my back and the makeshift floorboard width extender I attached with the Toko vise unbalanced the bench when working on the ski tips and tails.





Doing the pen test, the side edge angle of my skis seemed to be slightly off the 87 degrees advised by Blizzard. I assumed this was an inaccuracy with how they were originally set in the factory (or my edge tuning tool). But, I didn’t fancy trying any other angles as the difference was marginal (and Blizzard advised on 87 degrees). I also found it took a fair amount of pressure to wipe any of the pen off with a fine diamond stone. As such, I didn’t want to inadvertently blunt a section of the edge.

The tools were great, although I found the curve of my ski rockers a little tricky to follow with the angle guide which was better on the flatter sections of the ski. However, in retrospect, maybe I shouldn’t have been sharpening the rockers at all as I may have made them a bit hooky. A couple of time’s I found a ski still turning in the snow dome when I (thought I) had started a turn in the opposite direction.

I found scraping the wax off fairly time consuming and, even regularly sharpening the plexiglass, this took a lot of passes - many more than in the tutorial videos I’d been watching. I considered using the metal scraper for the first couple of passes, but I was a little apprehensive about damaging the bass edge on my first attempt.

Scraping wax off the rockers was the trickiest part. Especially the tip, trying to work tip to tail - the scraper would just dig in to the bass. Perhaps the wax I’m using is very hard. Using my metal scraper as a true bar, I noticed that the bases of my skis were a little concave in places. I think this contributed to making it hard to scrape the wax off with the plexi scraper not getting deeper than the bass edges, unless flexed.

I used masking tape to stop wax and edge metal getting everywhere. I think I’ll opt for electrical tape next time as some of the masking tape stuck to the edges and required scraping off.

In the snow dome, I found the skis had more glide making it much easier to ski skate between the lift and the slope. Apart from the hooky characteristics mentioned above, I seemed to have done a good job on the edges as far as I could tell within the limited ice of a snow dome. They were certainly sharper from dong the finger nail test.

I know it’s been mentioned that artificial snow is hard on skis, but I was slightly surprised to see my bases go back to a dry-looking grey after just 3 hours in the dome (see picture below). They were a lovely smooth and dark black when I finished waxing and polishing.



I’m going to do another hot wax/scrape, followed by a hot wax/cold scrape before heading off to The 3 Valleys. Hopefully that should hold the skis together for 6 days of heavy skiing; I’m not planing on taking all my many items of tuning equipment on the plane for a mid-week service!
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
spyderjon wrote:
@R1DSO, it would have been nice to have had the opportunity of quoting against your requirements as my prices are competitive with those but for higher spec items - & that's without me doing you a package deal. I would have also advised you not to buy certain items and there's a couple of things that you do need that aren't on your list. Plus you'd get the support of a UK retailer who's on the end of the phone from 9am to 9pm 7 days week when you need assistance.

And responds to random questions by email really quickly Happy
snow report     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@R1DSO, what's the "Multi-purpose scraper" for?

I'm intrigued by the "Scraper sharpener world cup". How does it work? (I currently just run the scraper over some sandpaper.)
snow report     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
sugarmoma666 wrote:
@R1DSO, what's the "Multi-purpose scraper" for?

I'm intrigued by the "Scraper sharpener world cup". How does it work? (I currently just run the scraper over some sandpaper.)


The scraper sharpener is just a sharp ridged file with a large plastic guide to hold the sharpener level. It seems to just shave a bit off the bottom of the plexi scraper. To be honest, I haven’t fully to to grips with it yet and haven’t been able to get the scraper as sharp as it was originally. It doesn’t help that it’s covered in very sticky wax now; I think I need some wax remover!

The multi-purpose scraper has a various different ridges and notches in it. What I’m using it for is scraping excess wax off the ski edges and sidewall. It’s also come in handy getting bits of masking tape off the edges. I’m going to give up on using masking tape, bar protecting the bindings from filings. It’s taking me too long to get it on the side wall and is harder to scrape off the remnants vs stray bits of wax.

I ended up just doing a hot wax/cold scrape last night. I spent more time ‘massaging’ the wax on to the ski basses so that there was a flatter and more consistent layer of it than before. This made the wax easier to scrape off when cold, although it was still fairly hard work. The width and rocker of my skis doesn’t help.

I’ve also now realised that the issue with the side edge angle looking slightly off is actually that the sidewall is sticking out a bit in front of the top of the side edge! Looks like I will already need to buy a side wall planer, which I wasn’t expecting would be necessary from the off with a new pair of skis rolling eyes.
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R1DSO wrote:
......I think I need some wax remover!.....Looks like I will already need to buy a side wall planer, which I wasn’t expecting would be necessary from the off with a new pair of skis rolling eyes.


spyderjon wrote:
.......I would have also advised you not to buy certain items and there's a few things that you do need that aren't on your list......

I did warn you. So that's two things from my list that you've now sussed out. Right first time always works out cheaper.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Sidewall planer is essential otherwise the plastic sidewall stops the edge file from doing its job........
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Quote:

Sidewall planer is essential


$~&* … Sigh … *goes back to the Piste office*
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
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I found that you can sharpen a scraper really well with some wet & dry paper over a piece of glass as a base.
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After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Well, after a couple of days skiing, I have to say that my first attempt at ‘tuning’ seems to be holding up pretty well.

First up, I was surprised by how much more ‘slippy’ my skis were on snow vs anything I’d hired before. It took some time to get used to trying to stay still in lift queues and at the side of pistes.

My skis also had a lot more slide through those annoying flat road run tracks between pistes – I was overtaking people who were crouching down trying to carry their momentum whilst I was casually standing up. Ski skating was easier too.

I expect that some of the above is from now skiing skis which (with a 94mm waist) are 1cm wider than what I’d managed to get my hands on to hire previously. But I’m putting the rest down to my waxing Cool. It’ll be interesting to see how much of that slide degrades over the next couple of days as the wax gets worn off.

The edges seem to be holding up pretty well too given the hard pack, ice and lack of fresh snow in the Alps currently. I’ll attack them with a sidewall planer when I get home!
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The lack of fresh snow last week in The 3 Valleys (until Friday 17th) meant I hit quite a few rocks on the piste. My bases and edges now have a few battle scars to show for it.

I'll be using one of my wax candles and the metal scraper to fill this base hole before giving the skis another hot wax:



And I'll be attacking this edge damage with my alu oxide stone, before polishing with my diamond stones. Whilst it was mentioned in this thread previously that base edges should ideally be left alone, it looks like I'm going to need to use the alu oxide and diamond stones on them to file away some of the dings Sad. I'll use a 1 degree base angle tool and try to minimise the amount of metal that I remove:









I was wondering whether the burrs from some of my edge damage may have impacted the performance of the skis during the week. On the penultimate day, one of my skis badly hooked up and kept turning in one direction after I had initiated my next turn. This happened twice with the same ski, halfway down a fairly icy Meribel black, although I (just) managed to recover both instances without a fall Shocked.

Apart from the damage, I was fairly impressed with how well my edge sharpness held up. Despite all the hard pack and a few patches of ice, my edges where still taking nail off doing the finger nail test at the end of the week.
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@R1DSO, it's folly to own edging tools but not take them away with you. An alu-oxide stone in your pocket/backpack would allow you to dress off that damage straightaway or back at base in the evening, as well as remove any general skiing burrs/rock dings throughout the week.

Just use your alu-ox on the base edge. The remaining scratches are too deep to be polished out with a diamond so don't even try. Most of that burr has been raised on the side edge anyway.
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