Ski Club 2.0 Home
Snow Reports
FAQFAQ

Mail for help.Help!!

Log in to snowHeads to make it MUCH better! Registration's totally free, of course, and makes snowHeads easier to use and to understand, gives better searching, filtering etc. as well as access to 'members only' forums, discounts and deals that U don't even know exist as a 'guest' user. (btw. 50,000+ snowHeads already know all this, making snowHeads the biggest, most active community of snow-heads in the UK, so you'll be in good company)..... When you register, you get our free weekly(-ish) snow report by email. It's rather good and not made up by tourist offices (or people that love the tourist office and want to marry it either)... We don't share your email address with anyone and we never send out any of those cheesy 'message from our partners' emails either. Anyway, snowHeads really is MUCH better when you're logged in - not least because you get to post your own messages complaining about things that annoy you like perhaps this banner which, incidentally, disappears when you log in :-)
Username:-
 Password:
Remember me:
👁 durr, I forgot...
Or: Register
(to be a proper snow-head, all official-like!)

Touring boot crampons

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
My grivel crampons are very old and heavy, it's time to replace them.

Was thinking of the Petzl Irvis or Irvis Hybrid (touring boot = Dynafit TLT6)
https://www.wildsnow.com/20746/petzl-irvis-crampons-review-mountaineering-glacier/

Anything else I should consider e.g. Grivel Haute Route?
Do the Alu heel pieces hold up well or is a full hard metal option better?
ski holidays
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
What are you using them for - a bit of security on hard snow or more technical mixed climbing?

I have some Camp Nanotech crampons which are light but made out of steel. Great for non-technical ski touring/mountaineering
latest report
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
I thought the Nanotechs were Alu with steel for the front points.
https://sectionhiker.com/camp-nanotech-xlc-crampons/

but I'm guessing you have these
http://www.camp.it/prodotti3.aspx?CAT=39&CDV=03&ART=~1624

I'd be using them mainly for higher altitude ski tours which would mean rocks at times and not just hard snow but not full on technical climbing/ice climbing. e.g. hope to do the Monte Rosa/Dufourspitze ski tour later this season. I also sometimes do 3000'ers here in Austria during the summer with mountain boots, again not full on technical climbing more mountain walking with the odd klettersteig thrown in.
ski holidays
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
Tough one. Maybe I’m a bit old school but I’d prefer my heavy old grivels if I knew mixed terrain would be involved
ski holidays
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
I am a pretty rubbish alpinist by the way so I like my kit to be as reassuring as possible
ski holidays
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
There is not a huge weight difference between steel and aluminium - personally I would go hardened steel - with anti balling inserts. There is not much point having crampons if they won't hold on hard ice. I have both Al. and Fe. and never bother with my Al. crampons now.

Actually do you want to buy them, they are wonderful ! Happy
snow report
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@DB, I use Petzl Vasak for both touring and climbing. Not too heavy and well made. Fit well as a step in on my Vulcan boots and semi-automatic on my TLT7 boots. Used for everything from plodding to Scottish VI

Wouldn't fancy aluminium on hard ice or rocks.
latest report
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
I still have a pair of old Grivel 2Fs, they are damn heavy. I can also fit my Charlet Moser climbing crampons on my ski boots, again a little heavy but very technical.
snow report
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@DB,
Quote:
Was thinking of the Petzl Irvis or Irvis Hybrid

It's a case of horses-for-courses : if your touring is going to include a lot of mixed snow/ice/rock routes then steel would be the way to go.

However for the majority of time ski-touring if your cramps are staying in your pack you want the lightest possible, so for max weight/functionality I've gone for the Petzl Irvis Hybrids.

Used them in anger negotiating a frozen waterfall in the Stubai, and the steel fronts were excellent: super spiky and no sign of dulling. The alloy heels are showing a bit of wear from the rock, but overall it's a good combination. The cord-tec connector is super-strong Dyneema cord so works well, but I guess you wouldn't want to subject it to prolonged use.
snow report
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
I find my haute routes ok for ski touring boot packing and ice scrambles.
snow conditions
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
https://weighmyrack.com/crampon
snow report
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
The above is a really useful site.
snow report
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
Aluminium is all you need for ski touring.
ski holidays
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
geoffers wrote:
.... for the majority of time ski-touring if your cramps are staying in your pack you want the lightest possible...........


Sounds like me, so I have Camp XLC 390 serving as ballast. Very light but possibly made from cheese.
ski holidays
 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Camp XLC 390 for me too - with home-made anti-balling plates. They work well enough on the few occasions I've needed them. They are a bit finicky on adjustment though - perhaps exacerbated by the small lugs on the front of my TLT5 boots.
ski holidays
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Thanks for all the info / advice.
I dug my old crampons out of the cellar. They are in better condition than I thought and don't look too bad once I cleaned the rust from them.

Here are a couple of pics (apologies for the wild animals in the background but the new puppy just wants to play all the time).





I need new anti-balling plates for them as some of the metal connecting riveted hooks have fallen out. Could continue to use these for the summer walking tours.
They must be around 17 years old now hope I can still get balling plates to fit.

For the ski touring I'll probably go for the Petzl Irvis Hybrid because -

They fit the Dynafit TLT6 well.
They have steel at the front and alu at the rear
They are around half the weight of most full steel crampons which is useful for a hut to hut tour
They pack down to asmall size saving backpack space.

If I can't get balling plates for my old Grivel G12's then I'll probably go for the full steel Petzel Irvis.
latest report
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@altis,
Would be interested to see how you made a set of balling plates yourself.
snow report
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Another vote here for the Irvis Hybrid - have used these and the leopard for various things over the last couple of years and I am a fan... Also have a pair of classic Vasaks if I am actually going to be on anything with decent amounts of climbing on ice or rock.

I have used full Alus in the past ski mountaineering but have also had some 'experiences' with them on steep slopes with underlying glacial ice where I would have much preferred to be on steel front points at least.

The Irvis Hybrid is a good compromise - as mentioned above they are quite light, and also fold down really small for the large amount of time they are likely to be in your pack.
snow conditions
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
@DB, your wish....





Just some bits of plastic card cut to the right shape and fiddled in and around stuff so it doesn't fall out. No 'pop' action but that doesn't seem to be a problem.
snow conditions
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@altis,
Thanks

Looks like I can buy the anti balling plates for around €45 which is way too expensive for what they are.
Should be able to piece something together out of thick plastic (e.g. bleach or clothes conditioner bottle). Will probably need to use some sort of wire to faster them to the crampons though.
snow report
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
That should do it. Just watch out you don't foul the slidey bar when you compress the crampons.

Blimey, with all this DIY we'll be taking up telemark next Wink
snow report
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
duct tape works pretty well as antiballing plate - obviously it wears out but then you just replace. if you are just using crampons for summit ridges etc then it will last a multiday tour
ski holidays



Terms and conditions  Privacy Policy