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Driving the tips..?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Mike Pow wrote:
...

'Actively carving full turns within a narrow corridor' is quite straightforward.

On a green or blue run!

It involves a rolling of both ankles simultaneously - to the left for example - to tip the full length of both skis on edge to create a right to left movement.

To change direction, both skis are flattened for a fraction of time, and then both ankles are rolled simultaneously - to the right in this example - to tip the full length of both skis on edge to create a left to right movement.


This is what I think of as passive carving.

Mike Pow wrote:
Where it becomes difficult is when the terrain steepens to a red or black gradient. Then the build up in speed on snow becomes terrifying.

To successfully perform short turns within a narrow corridor on steep terrain whilst keeping the speed on snow in check there has to be a blending of pivotting/steering, edging/carving & pressure control.

...
This is what I think of as active carving, but without the pivoting.

So having wandered into a thread about an obscure phrase that made sense to me but no-one else, I now find myself wondering if my whole frame of reference is different to everyone else. rolling eyes
snow conditions     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Unless I've missed it (probably), I can't see any reference to the ancient-yet-still-relevant phrase "finish the turn". Back when we wouldn't be seen dead on anything under 203cm, and turning was all about up-unweighting, angulation, pivoting, and finishing the turn by sinking back down and pressing forwards. These days, with equipment that frankly makes it all too easy peasy, not many people actually finish their turns.
ski holidays     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Penry wrote:
Mike Pow wrote:
...

'Actively carving full turns within a narrow corridor' is quite straightforward.

On a green or blue run!

It involves a rolling of both ankles simultaneously - to the left for example - to tip the full length of both skis on edge to create a right to left movement.

To change direction, both skis are flattened for a fraction of time, and then both ankles are rolled simultaneously - to the right in this example - to tip the full length of both skis on edge to create a left to right movement.


This is what I think of as passive carving.

Mike Pow wrote:
Where it becomes difficult is when the terrain steepens to a red or black gradient. Then the build up in speed on snow becomes terrifying.

To successfully perform short turns within a narrow corridor on steep terrain whilst keeping the speed on snow in check there has to be a blending of pivotting/steering, edging/carving & pressure control.

...
This is what I think of as active carving, but without the pivoting.

So having wandered into a thread about an obscure phrase that made sense to me but no-one else, I now find myself wondering if my whole frame of reference is different to everyone else. rolling eyes


The skis won't turn themselves, so both are active. The latter much more so than the former.

I guess parameters have to be set

how long are the skis?
how steep is the slope?
how wide is the corridor?

I can't see how a turn can be completed in a narrow corridor without pivotting/steering unless the tips are edging and the tails are skidding.

If that is the case then that's not what I consider to be 'carving'. Active or otherwise.
ski holidays     



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