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BUMPS - Help!

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
My tip with any difficult terrain is not to feel obligated to keep moving, or to go fast. You can use the bumps as a stopping point for a short break then move on. Obviously don't stop in front of others if it's the main route etc. I used to once specialize in helping people who had lost their nerve skiing. All I did was make them ski very slowly until they were bored. It only took a few minutes. Then I told them to be in charge of the speed they went and not to let he slope set their speed and they were good from then on. We used to get folk to see how slowly they could go down a bump run and how novel a route they could find. Everything could speed up from there.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
rum, you make a good point. When I've had a 'moment' (most recently in a narrow, hugely mogulled gully with a 40 degree pitch) that's thrown my confidence, I've found it best to get straight back on the horse... but a smaller horse, so to speak. I then work my way back up, which is usually a fairly quick process.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@rum, back to being able to turn <properly> on one bump. I.e. at 0 speed.
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
Quote:

All I did was make them ski very slowly until they were bored


INdeed. as I said near the top of the thread

"A snails pace is good. I'm serious.

The challenge in skiing bumps is speed control."
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=186&v=owZTKM8YN9M
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
@skimottaret, at 2:26 looks like he's letting his right arm get a little far back.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
not bad skiing eh ? like his skills progression on pistes and tactical suggestions in the bumps
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@skimottaret, oh, yes, very nice and well thought out vid.
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
yeah good vid
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
don't like the drill at 1:28 but his dolphin turns are awesome...
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
I thought he seemed quite porpoiseful.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@under a new name, get your coat. rolling eyes
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
No, really, seal-like, without either his, nor my, coat.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
On Monte Fort the extra black run in Verbier if my memory is working still, we were all instructors and all having serious doubts that we should have picked the steep bumpy run that day. Then a passer by dropped their camera which went hurling down the slope. We all went after the camera because the owner was a really attractive girl. We caught up with the camera after about 100 yards / meters and waited for the girl to reach us. While waiting it dawned on us that we hadn't noticed the slope or our anxiety at all while focused on something else. Lots of lessons there but the best was to stop focusing on our skiing but on just enjoying the scenery. We did try getting girls to throw their cameras for us to chase, they wouldn't of course but we discovered it was a great pick up line. Try it sometime.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
under a new name wrote:
@TTT, yeah. Me too.

So?

All. I am saying is that skiing bumps, fluidly, is a specific skill set. Based on solid fundamentals, sure, what isn't. But has a unique blend of:

Pre-rotation / compression-absorption-extension / rotation / skarving

That is not generally combined in other terrain.

And that even having a good grasp of each of these skills is not, in and of itself, going to result in fluid bumps skiing. Which is, as far as I can interpret it, your assertion.

P.S. Yeah, "ski like a porpoise" is real keeping it simple Puzzled you ever seen a porpoise ski?
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
I think fall line bump skiing is more like a snake than a porpoise, more of an art than a science. While technique, fundamentals and skill are important, the most important is confidence. Pole touch fludity helps. Choose your bumps wisely and if you are not confident find other bumps. Some bumps are not meant to be fall lined, unless you are ready for Warren Miller movies. After four decades of fall line bump skiing I was told by a trainer that it wasn't going to happen at my age. My skill technique and form are in the lower half of the instructors I teach with. Two of the instructors I teach with while skiing together said that my bumps were good or they couldn't keep up with me in the bumps. This raised my confidence and later that day I was in my 60s and skiing fall line bumps. Confession they were soft, small and on a blue run.

There is no greater exhilartion in skiing than fall line bumps. Develop confidence and find the right line. If you can't find the right line that you have confidence in, better to wait for the right line.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Quote:

When it's steep, bumps are your friend. If you use them properly, it's much easier (albeit much more tiring) to ski down a steep bump slope than a steep smooth slope.

I agree. In Les Arcs there is a lovely red run down to 1600 called cachete. After it crosses the blue pistes it has a short steepish section that because of it popularity gets polished smooth. Unless you really wnat to hurtle down with a couple of GS turns the only the safe way to do it is to head off to the unpisted area and the bump field. It will take you longer but feels much safer.

My only suggestion about skiing bumps is to keep pacticing. Don't worry about looking good, don't worry about skiing the fall line, just keep doing them.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@SteveSki58, Welcome to snowHeads snowHead
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