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Beginner questions: Tecnica Boots TNS

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Hi, I'd really appreciate some advice here, I just started to ski last season, till now I've always rented equipment, now I just met up with an used pair of Tecnica Boots. They seem to be in pretty good condition and fit very well, as for what I've read on the internet the fitting is ok. But my question comes about what kind of boots are these? Are they ok to a beginner like me? I couldn't find anything on the internet about this model. They say on the side at the ankle level "TNS Fibertech" They are exactly these:

http://www.skijanje.co.yu/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=105&stc=1&d=1138028584

http://www.skijanje.co.yu/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=104&stc=1&d=1138028573

Would you please give me some advice? are these too old boots?, do they fit for a beginner? If I use to stiff boots being a beginner, can I get a lesion easier? How I configure them, the calibrator on the red rectangle at the ankle and the flex and inclination control on the rear?

Thanks in advance for any tip, it's really appreciated.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Welcome, Bergsteiger.

The reason you can't find anything on the Internet is because they are 10 years old at least.

In four sentences:
Too old. Too stiff. Too clunky-shaped. Find something that was made this century.



In detail, read ONLY if you have absolutely no money and intend to ski these anyway:

The ankle is basically a pair of bolts.
You loosen them and flex forward. until the upper cuff aligns with the lower part of the boot. Then you tighten them. Except that you really don't want to do that without your foot in a well-supported position.

The "inclination" control on the rear only adjusts the spoiler and how closely it fits against your calf. With the boots unbuckled, you would flip the lever up, twist it so that the spoiler moves in or out on its screw, then rebuckle in the 'new' inclination. For someone with large calves the adjustment is fairly useless because the buckles can barely be buckled anyway. For someone with small calves the spoiler is probably all the way in so that the heel barely gets into the heel pocket, again almost useless anyway.

The flex adjustment is a rubber chock behind the Achilles' tendon. You flip the lever on the side up then twist it so that a pair of screw plates move either in or out; there is an indicator window on the back spine of the boot that tells you what position they are in. On a ten-year old boot I expect the rubber in the chock isn't remotely as resilient as it used to be, so I wouldn't really rely on that too much.

There is an adjustment that you haven't noticed yet. Turn the boots so that the inside of the foot faces up. There is a screw there also, that controls instep height.

The adjustments are not made with regular screwdrivers, there should also be a Tecnica tool of a keychain size, shaped like a Y, with two different-sized screwdriver tips on them. Those tips are about twice or 2.5 times the thickness of a regular screwdriver flat blade, which is why regular screwdrivers slip in the slots.

All of these adjustments are essentially compromises because they mimic what should be done by the bootfitter and not the skier. If you go to a bootfitter who would be willing to work with these boots (and I doubt they would), these systems would be mostly redundant.

Other than that, be very careful with the plastic, particularly where the upper and lower boot meet. Known cracking problems.

Did I mention that the buckles rust?
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
wow comprex, that was a really complete answer, thanks so much, I really appreciate it, you evacuated all my doubts and even more. Considering your advice I'll go after a "new era" boots, or I'll just keep renting this upcoming season, but I won't use something so arcaic not even for kicks, don't want to ruin my first experiences skiing. As last question and to close: What kind of boots and tables would you recommend me? Considering I'm a beginner and I don't want to be fast or do off piste, I'm just interested in regular skiing, and I'd like to make the closest turns possible. A plain and short advice will suffice, I don't want to take too much of your time, but just to have a general idea when going to the shop, I just don't trust 100% every seller around.

Thanks again comprex, I owe you a big one, you saved me from a bad experience trying these dinosaurs.
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
Bergsteiger, can't recommend models;

the seller you choose should look at:
your foot shape and how it behaves to pick models.
your build and ankle flexibility to figure out flex.

I would expect the seller to help you pick:
a boot that is a little higher in the line than the very,very basic polypropylene models;
a boot that, if you take the liner out and put your foot into just the hard plastic with toes as far forward as possible, has about 14-19mm space behind your leg
a footbed chosen to fit your foot to help it support skiing loads without changing shape too much.

Remember, you will be essentially balancing on one foot in these things, and using them to stop from 20kph or more to zero in a very short time. A small boot can be made bigger; a bigger boot can't really be made smaller and still do these things. Be prepared to spend a little time in the shop instead of buying the boot that's most comfortable immediately.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
You need to find a trusted boot fitter to help you out. It will be an expensive process, but worthwhile in the long run. If you have fairly average feet, a suitable medium range boot (impossible to recommend any specific models without consulting a bootfitter) with an after-market generic footbed should be fine. A custom footbed is the next step up the ladder and may even be recommended depending on your feet. But they're an expensive investment, so make sure you go skiing a lot to justify them Very Happy
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Thanks for all the advices. I think I will try out a few rented models this season before buying something, and buy after the season, I'll have very much in mind these advices. Thank you again. For the time being I'll keep reading. Smile See you.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Bergsteiger, do you travel to resort, or do you have local skiing nearby?
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
I have three ski resorts nearby enough to get there and come back in the same day from home (about 2 hours by car). I believe this will be all my skiing upcoming season, but I also can sleep at some nearby hostels and reach the center by car (which is far more cheaper and personally I find more enjoyable), about 30 minutes driving. Another different story is if I go to Las Leas, which is I believe the best ski center in South America, but it's at 400 kilometers from the city. Near the border with Chile there are open zones, (around 3 hours by car), where you can freely ski, no resort and no installations of any kind, ideal for ski touring, I'm mostly mountaineer and last year I took my first steps into the ski world attracted because of ski touring, so that's my goal about skiing, be able to make ski touring and then be able to go downhill alive lol. But I was recommended to learn first alpine ski, and then, start with touring.
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Bergsteiger, ah, very good, makes sense.

If you are doing a season rental for the boots, it doesn't make sense to buy because you will be buying touring boots soon.

If the boots are a rental by-the-day, however, it might save you some time and trouble on day trips to buy now.
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
As veteran ski tech I can say that the Tecnica TNS is one of the best boots I've ever skied or sold. The boot has dedicated following. Too bad they aren't in production anymore. You can still see these on the slopes. Its not easy to get people to trade them in. Its one of the best selling boots of all time. Boot fit comes down to the individual. Your mileage may vary.


Last edited by Ski the Net with snowHeads on Wed 23-08-17 23:37; edited 1 time in total
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
Holy thread resurrection Batman !!! :: Nine years is good going...
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Extra marks for joining a forum just to comment on a type of boot that must now be twenty years old!
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