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Over The Pond

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Hi snowHead

Right, as we are all aware there is a lot of hype about the lack of snow in Europe currently Sad


One of my best friends who I have been skiing with for years has put her foot down this year and said point blank that she refuses to book a european ski holiday unless it is just days in advance and we know that conditions we are heading out to will be excellent and there has been a dump.

Last year we skiied the Milky Way in Jan and had to put up with an awful lot of ice and it wasnt great

She also made a rather large statement that if she has to ski on ice for another week in europe she will never ski there again!! Shocked

So I am now having a look at alternatives over the pond



Sorry, that was a little of topic (just setting the scene), my question actually is..

How do acres compare to km!? obviously they cant be converted directly one is an area the other a length, but when looking at the size of North American resorts, how do they compare with europe, I know the amount of colour allocated runs are listed, but Ive been told most runs are a lot longer than European ones!?

Also I am of the understanding that the classification of runs out there is down a notch from their European counterparts, can this be said for all resorts or are there a couple that are particually diffrent!

Em
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
US and canadian trails are rated green/blue/black/double black and equate roughly to those in Europe, (red being black, black being double black). The mountains i've been to always seem to me to have more trails than their euro counterparts, you do less travelling about the place but get more runs. I've always though so anyway. How to explain... In my experience, the mountains i've ridden in the US and Canada tend to be centered around a central point with lift systems radiating out into the pisted ski areas from the central lodge area, while the european resorts tend to link small villages together, chaining them together with lifts up and pistes down.

US is also very keen on stating Vertical statistics (for some reason).

Final thing is it's rare to ski-in ski-out. Most mountain resorts are serviced by the local town and people commute to the hill each day rather than staying in slopeside lodging.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Agree with Richard_Sideways, there are more trails per acre over in the US/Canada.

The major advantage is that the whole area will be patrolled (where indicated) and avi controlled so the inbounds skiing isn't limited to only sticking to the pistes like in Europe. You don't require a guide to have the best of the off piste, because the off piste is still in-bounds.

If you go outwith the marked area however, you are on your own.

The areas in Europe are, for the most part, much bigger. However, this doesn't mean to say that they have more skiable terrain for certain standards of skier.
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Richard_Sideways wrote:
US and Canada tend to be centered around a central point with lift systems radiating out into the pisted ski areas from the central lodge area, while the european resorts tend to link small villages together, chaining them together with lifts up and pistes down.


Ah! see that is one of my big requirements of a ski trip, I really like skiing to a destination, I hate going up and down what is effectively the same hill just a diffrent route.

So I think I'll be looking for somewhere with a couple of places on the lift pass, Banff/LL or Park City!?

I'm not desperatly keen on lobbing myslef off the steepest run I can find, so I dont want to go anywhere with mostly black runs like vail for example!
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
jamese, When I started skiing again I used to think Whistler was Mega, it is certainly the biggest in North America at 8000+ acres but to put things into perspective L'Espace Killy is 25,000 acres and I believe Paradiski is 40,000+ acres.

Go and check it out, I haven't been across the pond for years but am heading back in Feb and doing a road trip in California, then again my flights across the pond is £98 return!
wink
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I just wanted to add that ice is by no means a purely European thing............
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
jamese, Bandd is super with options of day trips to Panorama & Kicking Horse to augment the 3 local hills.

Gets very cold in Jan and Feb thouhg and a bit of a hike between the 3 resorts.

That said we are heading back for our 3rd trip in March Smile
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Quote:

then again my flights across the pond is £98 return!


Where/how??!!
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Exactly! Where/ how? Paid £700 for my Vancouver flights in March.
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jamese, I'm afraid you've come with a lot of WRONG pre-conception about North America. So I doubt you'll enjoy it regardless of what the actual skiing is like:

Quote:

Ive been told most runs are a lot longer than European ones!?

Nope. Typically runs in N. America are shorter.

Quote:

I am of the understanding that the classification of runs out there is down a notch from their European counterparts

Wrong again. It's very much similar. Though in many resort, the more frequent snow fall and lower skier traffic leaves the condition considerable better so it felt easier. But if you're unlucky enough to got there with no fresh snow for a couple weeks, you'll find it equally difficult.

Quote:

I'm not desperatly keen on lobbing myslef off the steepest run I can find, so I dont want to go anywhere with mostly black runs like vail for example!

Vail has mostly black runs? rolling eyes What have you been drinking? Can I have the same?

In short, I don't think ice (or the lack of it) is the right reason for crossing the pond.
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Hmmm. Richard Sideways is accurate - I think if you like destination skiing then North America isn't for you (at least in my opinion). Even Banff - Sunshine / Lake Louise are "small" ski resorts radiating out from a single central area compared to a Euro mega resort. I've not go the maps to hand but from memory you can get from one side of Sunshine to the other in about 3 lifts and perhaps only two lifts for Lake Louise (up the front side; ski the back side then up Larch would be a full "traverse")

I'm not sure the grading is quite as simple as has been made out. I think Canadian blacks are perhaps slightly harder than european reds while the blues are in general slightly easier than blues in Europe (disclaimer - not skied in Europe for 4 years now so my memory is perhaps failing me). For example a Lake Louise Double black will almost never be groomed and is basically just pick a line down - more like off-piste by European standards.

The key thing is (as has been mentioned previously) is the difference between on-piste and off-piste compared to in-bounds and out-of-bounds. There are several discussions on here about this but the key thing is that you can ski anywhere within the ski resort boundary in North America; not just on the pistes. Hence the description of acres of accesible terrain rather than km's of piste.

Skiing steep and complex terrain is what it's all about in Canada (especially trees snowHead ) If you just stick to the groomed runs and are competent you'll ski everything that is available to you at Banff in 3 days (2 days at Sunshine; literally a day at Lake Louise). If however you're happy to go explore and "just see what that line through the trees looks like" then you'll have much more choice.

If you do want to visit Banff and are mostly about skiing groomed runs then plan a road trip where you only stay in one resort for 2/3 days. Some thing like Banff, Panorama, Kicking horse, revelstoke, Lake Louise and back.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
jamese wrote:

Ah! see that is one of my big requirements of a ski trip, I really like skiing to a destination, I hate going up and down what is effectively the same hill just a diffrent route.


...While that whole travelling to a fixed point doesn't do it for me, i'd much rather find a nice little spot and session it for a while then move on to another.

Quote:

So I think I'll be looking for somewhere with a couple of places on the lift pass, Banff/LL or Park City!?


Lake louise has the more euro feel to it of the Big 3 lift pass, personally I prefer Sunshine (most don't but i've had brilliant times there)
Never tried Park City, though heard good things from others...
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So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
Richard_Sideways wrote:
US and canadian trails are rated green/blue/black/double black and equate roughly to those in Europe, (red being black, black being double black)


Just a safety point here, a European black is not really equivalent to Canadian double black. Get to the top of a double black with that expectation and I'll think you'll be in for a bit of a nasty surprise wink
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You know it makes sense.
sweaman2 wrote:
I'm not sure the grading is quite as simple as has been made out. I think Canadian blacks are perhaps slightly harder than european reds while the blues are in general slightly easier than blues in Europe (disclaimer - not skied in Europe for 4 years now so my memory is perhaps failing me). For example a Lake Louise Double black will almost never be groomed and is basically just pick a line down - more like off-piste by European standards.


Even within the vagaries of Piste/Trail rating it's not. As in Europe area to area it varies, but generally IMO Canadian greens are Euro green/blue, blues are steeper blue/red, single black diamonds steeper reds/black and doubles mostly un-pisted/off piste, or there abouts. Don't worry too much about acreage. In Canada, unless specifically excluded, everything within the boundary tape is fair game, whereas in Europe it's not always.

However..........You will struggle at most areas to find enough for 10-13 days if you're a groomer cruiser, that's not what Canada is about. They groom much less as a percentage, it's more about off trail/side country than europe.

JMO.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
stuarth wrote:
Richard_Sideways wrote:
US and canadian trails are rated green/blue/black/double black and equate roughly to those in Europe, (red being black, black being double black)


Just a safety point here, a European black is not really equivalent to Canadian double black. Get to the top of a double black with that expectation and I'll think you'll be in for a bit of a nasty surprise wink

Europeans don't use double black. So some of the blacks are as challenging as the N. American double blacks. However, not all N. American mountain uses double blacks either. So you might be surprised at how challenging their single black is.

The whole business of grading falls down in some mountains that lacks one kind or another. They typically "move" their grading standard so it APPEARS they have all kinds. 2 example I knew about: Snowbird in Utah doesn't have much easy terrain. But they had to have greens (European blue). So they marked the easiest few trail of their terrain as green. Quite many beginners had complain it's really harder than a NA blue (European red)! The counter example is Okemo. It's a really flat mountain. So the hardest they mark black is still really blue at any other place!
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 Poster: A snowHead
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A couple more points:-

The skiing in N America is often from a base station with no, or little accommodation. There'll be a big car park with day facilities at the base of the skiing. Everyone turns up by car or bus, skis,then goes away again. E.g. the Lake Louise base complex is closed and deserted by 6.00pm each day. Sunshine is the same. Jackson hole likewise (although a vilage is being developed). Pick your resort carefully if you want to sleep/party near the skiing.

Also, it's a long way to the western resorts of Canada/U.S., it can take a couple of days to get over the jet lag. I wouldn't go all that way for just a week.

I'd suggest that, if you do decide to go, you do a two week/2 centre holiday. A few years ago I did a week in Steamboat followed by a week in Breckenridge. It worked out quite well.

Everyone should try N American skiing, many love it. I prefer the Alps.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Golden rules re skiing in North America:

- Don't bother going east of Colorado/Alberta
- Don't expect anything approaching the size/kms of mega resorts like PdS/3 Vallees
- Don't stay ski in/out unless you like paying a premium
- Do rent a car (all domestic tourists do)
- Don't complain about the Disney crap - it's not the Tyrol, no-one knows why they want to pretend it is
- Do laugh at fake cuckoo clocks, Alpenhofs and other nonsense
- Don't expect "authentic" on mountain bijou restaurants
- Do be prepared for more fall line runs and less ski "commuting"
- Do go prepared to take advantage of all the inbounds off piste
- Do research lift pass deals in advance - only mugs pay window prices
- Don't assume a single black diamond will be doable as you can do groomed European blacks - many places it might include off piste chutes or be only a notional designation where there is no actual signposted run (Kicking Horse springs to mind among many others)
- Do remember if you can see it generally you can ski it (subject to being good enough)
- Don't poach or duck ropes, yours and more importantly patrol's lives may be endangered and you put off opening for everyone while they track you down and torture you.
- Do remember there are more places in Canada than Banff and Whistler and in the US, Breckridge, Vail and Heavenly.
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Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
fatbob wrote:
Golden rules re skiing in North America:
<snip>
- Do remember there are more places in Canada than Banff and Whistler...

Yes, but only Sun Peaks and Big White wink
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stuarth, I'll give them Marmot Basin and Nakiska too.
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There's always Silver Star do the 3 resorts SP, BW and SS in one trip we do. Need a car though. You could use the bus book through resort web sites.
Most of the SS/BW condos are ski in/ski out SP not all ski in out but close. snowHead
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jamese wrote:
One of my best friends who I have been skiing with for years has put her foot down this year and said point blank that she refuses to book a european ski holiday unless it is just days in advance and we know that conditions we are heading out to will be excellent and there has been a dump.



Your friend is smart.

Old Europe is fading fast. It rarely snows nowadays. And when it does, the powda gets tracked by offpiste heros in a nanosecond.

Time to go Stateside.

Head to Jackson Hole or Aspen in Feb or Mar.

Enjoy.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
fatbob wrote:
Golden rules re skiing in North America:

- Don't bother going east of Colorado/Alberta
- Don't expect anything approaching the size/kms of mega resorts like PdS/3 Vallees
- Don't stay ski in/out unless you like paying a premium
- Do rent a car (all domestic tourists do)
- Don't complain about the Disney crap - it's not the Tyrol, no-one knows why they want to pretend it is
- Do laugh at fake cuckoo clocks, Alpenhofs and other nonsense
- Don't expect "authentic" on mountain bijou restaurants
- Do be prepared for more fall line runs and less ski "commuting"
- Do go prepared to take advantage of all the inbounds off piste
- Do research lift pass deals in advance - only mugs pay window prices
- Don't assume a single black diamond will be doable as you can do groomed European blacks - many places it might include off piste chutes or be only a notional designation where there is no actual signposted run (Kicking Horse springs to mind among many others)
- Do remember if you can see it generally you can ski it (subject to being good enough)
- Don't poach or duck ropes, yours and more importantly patrol's lives may be endangered and you put off opening for everyone while they track you down and torture you.
- Do remember there are more places in Canada than Banff and Whistler and in the US, Breckridge, Vail and Heavenly.

I think that I just read the single most perceptive post that I've encountered in more than seven years of being a snowHead . fatbob is completely correct in everything he says, but I'll add a few more:

- Don't expect to bash out hundreds of kilometers of piste motorway
- Do book some lessons, preferably private, to prepare you for the advanced terrain - powder, bumps, glades and chutes - that you'll rarely encounter in Europe without a guide
- Don't think that the label on your gear is more important than the gnarliness of your skiing. It isn't.
- Do read up on the dangers of tree wells before you go
- Don't believe what they say about travel time and jetlag. It's all cured within 30 minutes of hitting the slopes
- Don't kid yourself that a North American double-black is no more difficult than a European black, or you might wind up in hospital
- Do be prepared to ski the same run repeatedly until you've mastered it - especially double-blacks
- Don't waste time stopping for a long lunch. Grab a bowl of chili or a pancake and head straight back outside instead
- Do order a pitcher of beer (each) from the local microbrewery when the lifts shut
- Do make sure that you've done your gym work before you leave home: all-day bumps are incredibly knackering
- Do extend the mortgage. Europe might seem second rate once you've tasted the West
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
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Just wanted to add some resorts in Canada that are ski in ski out. Sunshine and LL aren't because they are in the National Park which prohibits development

Fernie, Kimberley, Panorama, Kicking Horse, Revie, I think Red, Castle, Silver Star, Big White, Sun Peaks etc all have ski in ski out

I will add a couple of don't to the list

Don't expect fruit and veg
Do expect pre-salted fries
Don't be surprised when Highway 1 shuts for avvie control between golden and Revelstoke and/or Revelstoke and Sicamus
If travelling by car in canada do be prepared for emergencies and don't drive in shirt sleeves in mid-winter.
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Seems to me money isn't a factor for those above, but to me when a week can cost an extra grand or more, must bear in mind most hotels there aren't half board, mostly B&B, more than likely will require some driving, hardly ever have ski to door and nightlife will never compare to the alps.

What I would say is if you haven't been before go, but if your expecting everything to do with skiing to be amazing in every sense then brace yourself for shocks Twisted Evil
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The Tahoe resorts have a couple of places where you can stay on-site and there are several to choose from. But for me once you've been to Utah you'll be spoilt for life, great snow, well groomed, tree runs, great snow, decent food and beer, great snow, good prices, great snow. If you end up in the States, check out litopia.com for ticket deals or buy through local shops or tourist websites as often decent discounts.
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I still have faith in the Alps, I havent even got round to doing the 3V yet Shocked , so that was my aim this year.

My friend's text last night said -

'Would still rather be going down long guaranteed powdery runs, than lots of short icy ones in Europe' Puzzled

She believes that heaven on earth lys just over the pond!.......... I need to show her some of your enlightening posts above!!


I've always wanted to ski over there but I dont think I'm ready yet, my off piste needs some serious work on it before I think we can go over and make the most of it.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Lots of good info above, especially the concentrated amount in fatbob's.

There are pros and cons to both Europe and the US, but in general I do agree that the snow is probably more reliable in places like Utah, Wyoming and N Colorado than many of the Euro resorts (especially the lower parts of many resorts). Luck and timing still play a role. A mate of mine in London would certainly agree- he is heading back to do his 3rd season at Vail after having been disappointed by Verbier last year. I, on the other hand, really enjoyed the 07-08 season I spent in Bourg St Maurice but know that I might have gotten a bit lucky with the snow as we only had 1 extended patch (6 weeks mid season) where we did not get some good fresh stuff.

While I agree that Europe is better for destination skiing with the resorts linking villages and being less centralized, you don't have to do the same run over and over at the bigger US resorts. I lived in Colorado for 3 years and rarely skied the same run back to back. Sometimes we would concentrate on a certain part of the mountain for a while before moving on, but other times go from lift to lift without repeating. Vail, for example is big and spread out enough that the front and back sides really need their own trail map (with separate pictures for the bowls and Blue Sky Basin). Breckenridge is smaller than Vail, but still has 4 different Peaks that can all be skied (to an extent) by an advanced intermediate. Keystone has 3 different Peaks letting you ski all directions (NSEW) with Copper being similar (but more segmented by terrain level without much true South exposure).

A few misconceptions (others tried to clear up):

Runs are not longer in the US, but you will likely find stuff that is long enough for you.

Vail is not overly steep for the most part- probably best for advanced intermediates which is why it (and Deer Valley) are consistently rated at the top by popular ski publications. These are not hard core areas by any means. A bunch of Vail (and other CO) pictures here shows that there is plenty of less steep terrain http://www.flickr.com/photos/fuzzsummit/5374267318/in/set-72157625148529215/lightbox/

There may not be as much ski-in, ski out (and it does sort of tie you to a single area), but there are some that I am familiar with including Park City, Deer Valley, Canyons, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge and Copper Mountain. Expect to pay a premium.

I offer discounts to Snowheads who want to stay in a real, walkable town with shopping and restaurants that is central to much of the best skiing in Colorado.
[img]Lots of good info above, especially the concentrated amount in fatbob's.

There are pros and cons to both Europe and the US, but in general I do agree that the snow is probably more reliable in places like Utah, Wyoming and N Colorado than many of the Euro resorts (especially the lower parts of many resorts). Luck and timing still play a role. A mate of mine in London would certainly agree- he is heading back to do his 3rd season at Vail after having been disappointed by Verbier last year. I, on the other hand, really enjoyed the 07-08 season I spent in Bourg St Maurice but know that I might have gotten a bit lucky with the snow as we only had 1 extended patch (6 weeks mid season) where we did not get some good fresh stuff.

While I agree that Europe is better for destination skiing with the resorts linking villages and being less centralized, you don't have to do the same run over and over at the bigger US resorts. I lived in Colorado for 3 years and rarely skied the same run back to back. Sometimes we would concentrate on a certain part of the mountain for a while before moving on, but other times go from lift to lift without repeating. Vail, for example is big and spread out enough that the front and back sides really need their own trail map (with separate pictures for the bowls and Blue Sky Basin). Breckenridge is smaller than Vail, but still has 4 different Peaks that can all be skied (to an extent) by an advanced intermediate. Keystone has 3 different Peaks letting you ski all directions (NSEW) with Copper being similar (but more segmented by terrain level without much true South exposure).

A few misconceptions (others tried to clear up):

Runs are not longer in the US, but you will likely find stuff that is long enough for you.

Vail is not overly steep for the most part- probably best for advanced intermediates which is why it (and Deer Valley) are consistently rated at the top by popular ski publications. These are not hard core areas by any means. A bunch of Vail (and other CO) pictures taken by one of my ski buddies shows that there is plenty of less steep terrain http://www.flickr.com/photos/fuzzsummit/5374267318/in/set-72157625148529215/lightbox/

There may not be as much ski-in, ski out (and it does sort of tie you to a single area), but there are some that I am familiar with including Park City, Deer Valley, Canyons, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge and Copper Mountain. Expect to pay a premium.

I offer discounts to Snowheads who want to stay in a real, walkable town with shopping and restaurants that is central to much of the best skiing in Colorado.
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
Sign me up for the church of fatbob and Jonny Jones, TESTIFY BROTHERS! *hands in air/tamborine time*
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 You know it makes sense.
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Richard_Sideways, Membership available for a very reasonable tithe of 20% of your gross income to the 100% charitable Send me up in an Alaskan Heli fund.
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jamese wrote:
I still have faith in the Alps, I havent even got round to doing the 3V yet Shocked , so that was my aim this year.

My friend's text last night said -

'Would still rather be going down long guaranteed powdery runs, than lots of short icy ones in Europe' Puzzled

She believes that heaven on earth lys just over the pond!.......... I need to show her some of your enlightening posts above!!


I've always wanted to ski over there but I dont think I'm ready yet, my off piste needs some serious work on it before I think we can go over and make the most of it.


If you have never been mate, I would go, personally I enjoyed Lake Tahoe because of the various areas around it, and Ceaser's Palace is a good reason too!

Regardless if you do or don't go, it doesnt mean the alps won't be there next year! lol
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fatbob wrote:
Richard_Sideways, Membership available for a very reasonable tithe of 20% of your gross income to the 100% charitable Send me up in an Alaskan Heli fund.


I have the faith, but i'm not that observant - TBH I think we're just doing it for show and to get the kids into a good (ski) school. Anyway isn't tithing 10% on gross (hence the name tithe - tenth)
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
jamese wrote:
'Would still rather be going down long guaranteed powdery runs, than lots of short icy ones in Europe' Puzzled



Your friend is half-right.

Better to be going down midsized, near-guaranteed powdery runs, than lots of long icy ones in Europe'
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jamese wrote:

How do acres compare to km!? obviously they cant be converted directly one is an area the other a length, but when looking at the size of North American resorts, how do they compare with europe, I know the amount of colour allocated runs are listed, but Ive been told most runs are a lot longer than European ones!?


Never mind all that crap, this is what Canada is all about.


http://youtube.com/v/ELNVLt2JhnY
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Just to point out fresh powder isn't a sure fire thing - I still shudder at memories of kicking horse when there hadn't been any snow for a couple of weeks... steep, icy , moguls.

In Canada you have more chance of good stuff but weather is weather and not a certainty. In 3 years I would say that inbounds in a resort I've probably had 4 days like UKtrailmonster's video.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Fortunate enough to have only experienced KH in fine fresh powder - Spent a whole day sessioning the Crystal bowl area. When i'm tucked up in my budget nursing home for the terminally baffled, drooling into my own underpants, that'll be one of the etched in memories thats left rattling around... Can imagine the frozen hellscape it could become in ratty conditions though.
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Quote:

'Would still rather be going down long guaranteed powdery runs, than lots of short icy ones in Europe'

She believes that heaven on earth lys just over the pond!.......... I need to show her some of your enlightening posts above!!

there's a useful link on the weather outlook thread (posted by fast eddie) to a report on the currently poor snow conditions in parts of N. America - show her that, too. Utah powder not up to scratch at the moment, it seems.
snow conditions
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
uktrailmonster, Ironically your video seems to be blocked by youtube in Canada so i can't quite see what the Canadian conditions are meant to be like! Madeye-Smiley
Anyway to make all of those over the other side of the pond feel better, following a good start of more-or-less non-stop snow, it hasn't really snowed here for getting on for 2 weeks and the forecast isn't looking like promising much at the moment Sad
ski holidays
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
jamese,

You can't predict what you're going to get.

Last year much of Europe was hard packed piste (not icy, just hard packed - can we read anything into the "icy" comment?)

Much of Italian pistes are groomed that way by design. It's easier to ski on if it's smooth and firm.

Going to the US or CA does not guarantee good conditions. You might get lucky, you might not.

And going across to Central or Western NA necessitates a much longer flight. Plus a serious lack of mountain atmosphere, fine dining, etc.

Not necesssarily a problem, just different.
snow conditions
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
sweaman2 wrote:

In Canada you have more chance of good stuff but weather is weather and not a certainty. In 3 years I would say that inbounds in a resort I've probably had 4 days like UKtrailmonster's video.


Of course it doesn't snow every day or even every week (although that's quite a rarity IME skiing in late Dec thro' March), but in the past 5 seasons I've been going to Big White (average around 30 days skiing per season) conditions have been fresh powder on average at least a couple of days per week - so probably around 40 days like this in all. Certainly lost count anyway! But perhaps just as significantly, on the other days conditions have nearly always been nice and soft. I can honestly say I've only skied ice a handful of days out of the 150 days I've been there. A combination of consistent low temps (none of this freeze-thaw nonsense unless you go very late season), regular snowfall and generally uncrowded pistes. Snow preservation is usually excellent so you can still be skiing fresh tree lines a good week or so after a dump. Interestingly you don't tend to get massive single storms in Big White, but it tends to snow pretty consistently over long periods which I prefer in many ways.

Here's another big day for you (note this is mainly on-piste) and also early season too. Enjoy!


http://youtube.com/v/PFRHKPcZrLA

http://youtube.com/v/yBrbzqQVdjY
ski holidays
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
under a new name wrote:
Plus a serious lack of mountain atmosphere, fine dining, etc.

Not necesssarily a problem, just different.


No shortage of high end dining most US destination ski resorts (& Whistler of course). Your more blue collar Canadian mining/lumber towns perhaps less so though they do have alternative entertainment (Fresh Meat Monday anyone?) The mountain atmosphere is more tallboys on the back of your truck/margaritas at the cantina lots of places.

KH is definitely bipolar - very, very good or hideous. I wouldn't plan an entire holiday there and I love the place.
snow conditions



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