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Seeking advice on off-piste skis / skiing

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Everyone, I'm a bit at sea on this issue, and having spent far too much time reading reviews and looking at videos, I'd like to just get some advice from people that know.

I'm starting to get interested in more serious off-piste skiing, and am considering the Snoworks course in Tignes this December. They recommend (and hire out) the Salomon QST 88, but given that I'm already planning 2 other trips this winter, and given that I want to be off-piste much more often, I think it makes sense to buy.

My current skis are the only ones I've owned, they're 2013/14 Rossi Pursuit 16's, 163cm long and 74mm wide underfoot. I bought them as a beginner when we lived in New England and I've really loved them, they are fun and they carve reasonably well. I don't mind that they're probably too short for me, or that they are beginner skis - I've hired skis many times and rarely found something that I have as much fun on as my own. Downsides are that they're heavy to carry around (they have metal layers) and when I'm skiing really fast they don't inspire total confidence. But I don't strongly feel that I need another piste ski.

From all of the reading and Internet research, I like the looks of the Blizzard Rustler 10, the Nordica Enforcer 100, the Fisher Ranger 98 Ti, and the Salomon QST 99. I wonder if any of you have a few on this list?

For background, I'm about 6' tall and 155 lbs. I think I'm a good intermediate skier - I'm comfortable on any of the black runs that I've come across, I can (ungracefully) get through well-formed mogul fields, and I have a bit of experience in deeper, soft Colorado snow. I maintain my own skis (so I already have all the equipment for that) and I already carry a ski bag when I travel, so it wouldn't be too difficult to add a second pair of skis.

I've demoed a few soft-snow oriented skis with mixed results. I tried a Rossi Soul 7 in 2015, it was amazing in really soft snow but horrible on anything mixed. I also tried a Blizzard Bonafide in 2015 and found it acceptable, not amazing - I didn't feel much of a relationship to that ski, it was a bit boring. I know it gets incredible reviews, though, and I just think maybe I'm not skilled enough to get more out of it. I've skied a Rossi Super 7 in 2016 and 2019, the first time in deep powder I loved it, the second time on mixed snow I hated it.

I'm going to try to get to Octobertest in Hemel Hempstead, but with family commitments it's going to be somewhat difficult. It would be great if anyone has ideas in the meantime. Thank you!
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My thought would be that as a reasonably light skier, that is cutting their teeth Off Piste, is used to a fairly narrow ski and will also be skiing On Piste, I would look at a ski that (Assuming you are going with one set of skis, rather than dedicated Off Piste skis):

- Is not too wide ie. 88 - 95mm under foot
- Is Reasonably on the "Playful" side
- Has Decent On Piste performance

I have Scott "The Ski", which I love. It's not a ski if you are heavy and ski very fast.

Head Core 93
Atomic Vantage 90 Ti
Nordica Enforcer 93 (less playful and more stable)

Saying all that, nothing beats trying for yourself.
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Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
I would say the opposite, big skis make it easy and you already have a narrow pair of skis, get something big and if conditions are really firm everywhere then use your other pair. Bear in mind that many of these skis are going to feel less than great at an indoor test as you can't get up that much speed indoors (if you get something with a shallow sidecut they will need a bit of speed to come alive) and the snow is hardly powder.
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rambotion wrote:
I would say the opposite, big skis make it easy and you already have a narrow pair of skis, get something big and if conditions are really firm everywhere then use your other pair. Bear in mind that many of these skis are going to feel less than great at an indoor test as you can't get up that much speed indoors (if you get something with a shallow sidecut they will need a bit of speed to come alive) and the snow is hardly powder.

...which is why I qualified my answer, by saying it was on the assumption that the new skis would replace the old skis and become a single All Mountain pair.
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Thanks both @Old Fartbag and @rambotion, I was thinking of adding the off-piste to the bag rather than replacing my piste skis. Does that mean 88-93 is still a good width, given my weight, or should I go a little wider? Any suggestions on how I could try some of these skis in Tignes?
snow conditions     
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@diaphon, you're not exactly heavy, so you don't need to max out on width to get float. If you are keeping your piste skis, I'd probably go a bit bigger, somewhere in the 100-110 range. You probably also want to go longer, especially if the ski has any rocker.

Most shops will let you demo skis (and change them as often as you like) for the cost of a decent rental. Just go in, explain what you're looking for and go from there. However, you may not find all the skis you're interested in, in one shop.

Personally, if I was in your situation, I'd go with Snoworks recommendation, and then if you have time during the week, demo wider skis. That way you have a reference point (The QST 88s) to compare against. Then you'll be more informed about a purchase later on. It'll cost a little more but you will end up with the right ski. You already know that internet reviews aren't everything.
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Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
diaphon wrote:
Thanks both @Old Fartbag and @rambotion, I was thinking of adding the off-piste to the bag rather than replacing my piste skis. Does that mean 88-93 is still a good width, given my weight, or should I go a little wider? Any suggestions on how I could try some of these skis in Tignes?

I was in a similar position to you, in that I had Piste Skis around 70mm underfoot.

I can only talk with any authority about the Scotts, which I own.

I bought some Scotts in a 180 (92mm), as I wanted a more Off Piste orientated ski. I am 140 lbs and 5' 10" and learned to ski Off Piste on straight skis - though I didn't get the chance to do lots of Off Piste, as a one or two week a year skier. I am a half decent On Piste skier - and around Silver Standard Off Piste (SCGB), achieved on straight skis.

Having now used the Scotts for a while, they do everything well and IMO have enough width to handle Backcountry. They are not as fast edge to edge in short turns as a Piste Ski and are versatile enough, that I would never consider bringing 2 sets on holiday. I can ski them long, for my weight, as they aren't too damp (and I spent years on a 2m Straight ski).

If you are sure you want to keep using your Piste Skis (which are probably a little short and not an Advanced Ski) - then you could certainly look at going up to 100mm underfoot. The wider you go and the more you have an Off Piste profile, the easier Off Piste becomes - but "can" be at the expense of Piste Performance.

I have skied some Blizzard (Quattro)....which I found very stable, but left me a bit cold. At my weight, I prefer something more Playful.

I strongly suspect that something like the Scotts would be sufficient - but more sensible if you decided on going with one pair. If you want to hang onto your existing skis, then maybe look at something like the Head Core 99, which is light, easy to use and decent On Piste (and an award winner in last year's SCGB test).


Last edited by Then you can post your own questions or snow reports... on Thu 19-09-19 22:15; edited 1 time in total
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After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
It seems you're at that junction of advancing your skill through the course you're taking and prior to that skill acquisition it's a little more difficult to decipher the signals a more advanced ski will give to you right now.

I can see why they'd use the QST 88 as it will show you alot under their tuition / guidance and be not too demanding with someone they had to coach more into exploring their own limits, but would I want to end up owning one if skill advanced enough is a different question.

I'd much more like to end up on a Kastle FX95, a sublime ski for longer term ownership. But if you skied it now you may not see that immediately, classic catch 22.

They have a strong fanbase here, mainly because they are so very capable at such a broad range of conditions. Exemplary on piste but not really limited off piste either unless you get toward pure powder skis. There's a subtlety to them that makes you smile right from slow down soft response up to absolutely flat out.
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@diaphon, I'd ditch the old piste ski's. Get some good all mountain skis (90-100 underfoot) and they'll serve you right. Unless you are skiing piste all day you don't a piste ski and unless you ski big pow on a regular basis you don't need a 105+ ski. You've just got to find one you get on with. And that is a bit of trial and error really. Octobertest is in a fridge so you can get a feel but you won't be skiing what you do on the mountains. Equally in resort they will always have a limited range. The good news is that there will be several skis that do the job. As suggested you could take the QST 88's and then see what else is available to try that week.

All IMO of course.

Good luck in your quest.
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There is a new Whitedot Altum 104. Spyderjon brought it to the EOSB and to me and my limited experience it felt perfect on mixed conditions.
The hotel's rental gave me the QST 88 for comparison. My on piste skis are Salomon XDR 80 Ti so I thought it will be easy to switch. And it was, but they felt technical. Skiing on the Altum was sheer natural fun to cruise all new snow.
You already have a good on piste ski. As a second pair, aimed for snowy unbashed days and off piste, try to check it. It will add fun.
snow conditions     
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If you're doing a course in Tignes is it possible to rent different skis throughout the duration? You could get the 88mm but if you do get into off piste skiing I would suggest that you'd grow out of them pretty quickly and want something bigger. However, at the stage you are now something bigger may be difficult to handle.

I was in the same boat as you last year (almost). I had a pair of 88mm underfoot skis, did a season in the alps and wanted something bigger. I rented and tested 5-6 different skis and ended up with black crows navis (102mm underfoot) which I've loved. However, after another year in Chamonix and improving as a skier I now think I'd be ok with something 108ish as my daily driver and something even wider for super deep days.

Unless you're racing/instructor training/just super into piste then I'd ditch the piste skis as well. Once you get into off piste you'll never use them...
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And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@diaphon, I thought I’d posted yesterday, butter fingers!

Delightful to see a well considered and thoughtful query!

My own background is learning from an early age on straight skis and being rather resistant to the need for anything wider, even spending an afternoon heli skiing in deep BC powder on GS skis... (the guide was on straight skis, why shouldn’t I?)

Anyhoo, we’d tried Mantras on a trip and decided that wider than 66mm might be a good idea when we moved to the Alps. They served us very well.

They wore out a couple of years ago and so we went atesting.

Having tried ? 7 ? skis all of similar on paper geometries and characteristics, all but one of which (Elan Ripstick, which despite Plank’s apparent input, was a floppy noodle) would have worked if it was the only ski in the world, the Mrs ended up with Mantras and I on Bonafides.

But the big takeaway was just how very, very different they all felt. We’re both quite sensitive about our skis.

So my advice, partially echoing that above, if you are successful in your worthy ambition, you’re wants are likely to change faster than you’ll want to change skis.

So at least for the first trip I’d a. just run with the QSTs as you want to be concentrating on what’s being taught or b. If you have the mental bandwidth and the opportunity, try various models, bearing in mind you might find yourself setting out from the GM cabin and deciding that you hate that day’s skis after 5 seconds with no alternative but to have a less than optimally pleasant day.

I’d do a. And then on a later trip trial a variety of models and makes.

Also bear in mind that the Bonafides require a certain commitment or they can feel lifeless. But with the right inputs, they are terrific. And have no apparent speed limit.


Last edited by And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports. on Fri 20-09-19 8:17; edited 1 time in total
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So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
Contrary to most of suggestions, don't ditch piste skis, at least if you can afford to bring few pairs of skis with you. No matter what people say, 90-100mm skis for piste is like going with tractor to F1 race track. It goes around, but it's anything but good. It of course depends where you are skiing and how you are skiing, but for me, most of skiing on piste is on hard conditions, where my FIS GS and SL skis works like charm, and off piste skis lightly said suck big time.
Another thing is "skiing off piste". Europe in most of cases is not Alaska or West coast of US. You might be lucky and have something what we had last January, but that's more of exception then regular winter. With fresh snow every few weeks, and with current state when everyone and their dog do "off piste" everything is tracked in few hours, unless you go ski touring, which I think is not question here. So yeah for me, who is living in Alps it's definitely cool to have several other pairs next to my race skis, ranging from 85mm light skimo skis to 120mm pow skis, but if you come down here once a year for week, your chances of getting good off piste skiing are relatively low, so if you want just single pair, I would rather go for real piste skis, then off piste who would come handy for a day every 4 years (you could still hire pow skis for that day) and you would suffer every other day on piste with them.


Last edited by So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much on Fri 20-09-19 8:45; edited 1 time in total
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
Hmmm, good point from @primoz. I don’t find the Bonafides any real compromise, partially as off-piste doesn’t mean powder, and they are definitely easier better in crud.

But if there’s a super cheap, hardly used pair of SLs in the ski jumble... I would be tempted... I do have GS and SGs anyway...

But it’s worth asking about what sort of “off-piste” you’re expecting?
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In my humble opinion, anything wider than 80 is so boring on piste that it will spoil your day. You have mentioned that you find the powder/all mountain skis uninspiring on piste - which they are. Slow to respond and with a turning arc like a super tanker, they will suck the joy out of your well deserved skiing break. They will make light work of any off piste you come across, so if you plan on skiing in deep stuff, try a few pairs. Don't discount 'normal' width skis though; these days skis are wider than in the good old days and are generally quite acceptable in powder, especially if you are not spending all day in it.

Have you noticed in the last few years when people post helmet-cam videos of themselves skiing *amazing* powder, the 100+ wide skis make it look like they are skiing on a normal piste? If they were on narrower skis, they'd sink a bit and the effect would be more dramatic and everyone would be more wow than yawn.

Sorry for the rant - ski chat is my nemesis! Get some Head Magnums or Titans and be done with it, everything else is vanity unless you are Ted Ligety or Glen Plake. wink
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 Poster: A snowHead
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The other thing that I'd pick up on is that the OP didn't get on with Soul 7 and Super 7 in "mixed" conditions. I'd say that both those skis (given that they have a reasonable amount of shape) are among the better wide skis for all conditions use. What I take away from that is that @diaphon, really enjoys the precision and nimbleness of a narrower ski on firm snow. I'm sure he'd adapt but I think he might always be a bit disappointed by a "quiver of one" 100mm ski.

That said I'm finding it difficult to make a recommendation of whether to go for a purer soft snow ski or a compromise (given he didn't like either the Rossis or the Bonafides).
On balance I think you need to test more skis.
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"No matter what people say, 90-100mm skis for piste is like going with tractor to F1 race track."

"In my humble opinion, anything wider than 80 is so boring on piste that it will spoil your day."

I'm calling both of these statements out and two counts.

#1 It's simply not true IME. To put aside pure personal experience, and to elaborate on the point... I'd ask this question... what do we even mean by piste skiing. If you look at the competition disciplines for example... downhill, super-G, slalom, bumps, freestyle... they all used specialised ski's.... so an all piste ski itself is a massive compromise.

#2 IME punters (like me) who go for a weeks skiing at a time take what they can get and will serve a mixture of piste, lift served off piste, maybe something a bit more gnarly not just in the week but in day. Even if I could financially and logistically take out two or more pairs of ski's I would always take out the compromise all mountain ski.

If you are a pure piste skier or have days when you purely ski on piste then absolutely I would support the idea of having a piste skiing but the alleged under performance of a 90-100 is massively exaggerated in the statements above IMO.

Disclaimer: been skiing Dynastar Cham 98 two weeks a year for the last few seasons.
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Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Yeah agreed on the exaggeration above - my 102s make perfectly acceptable short turns on piste and are great fun if you let them go in big arcs. If I'm skiing hard pistes all day then *maybe* I'd want something different but that is almost never the case.
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@jedster, I think @diaphon, is refreshingly candid re ability hence opinions on Bonafides at least. They need quite a firm hand to get the best out of them.

I think a 95-100 ski can easily be your daily driver, esp. if your daily drive is quite mixed.

If I lived in, say, Champoluc, and was always on perfectly manicured, firm pistes, I’d want SLs. Just for the rebound.

Winter is coming wink
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Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Layne wrote:
"No matter what people say, 90-100mm skis for piste is like going with tractor to F1 race track."

"In my humble opinion, anything wider than 80 is so boring on piste that it will spoil your day."

I'm calling both of these statements out and two counts.


I'm agreeing with the 2 points, you can carve much cleaner lines and therefore ski faster on piste, with a <80mm ski, it's also perfectly fine (if your technique is) in off piste, crud, until it get's really deep.

Example in point, I took out my Whitedot R.98s and Volkl Code Speedwalls (76 underfoot) for a day, switching between the 2. The R.98s were good, I certainly had fun on them. At lunchtime I stayed on the Volks, they were just more fun, more precise, more nimble, (obviously) stiffer and therefore better to drive hard.

I ended up doing laps of an offpiste section on the Volks that I had to traverse across some sketchy solid snow to get to and then ski piste to get the lift back up.



It's a huge marketing push IMHO to ski "wider".

Think about where you'll spend most of your time and buy a ski for those conditions. If you can get a quiver of 2 then great, get one <80mm and one just around 98mm IMHO.

For the guys who live in resort, skiing off piste when ever they can, then yes 100mm+ works, for most of us punters I don't think it is necessary.

I'll get the popcorn..........
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@Layne, agree with your post regarding relative merits.

The tractor analysis doesn't offer anything but for comedy effect. If you put any one of us onto a race track in a selection of absolute "hyper-cars" legal for road use, non of us would see which way a formula one car went in reality.
The more realistic view is what would we think of said "hyper-cars " and that's far more of what we are buying in ski terms. Do general skiers mostly participate in the market for pure race skis? No, not really.

Further, the tractor analogy would have us all driving formula one cars on the street with that being in general use by others. Toofy Grin

A very closed view of directing skiers like the OP towards only extreme ski types certainly doesn't seem to fill the brief of a well placed original enquiry.

Answers offering up "top-of-the-range" syndrome really don't illuminate and inform on the subtle intricacies of ski choice, in other words as long as the responder is buying something they feel shows their choice has a "superior" caché above anything else out there, then they are happy.
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@kitenski, that's not off piste, that looks like"dust on crust"... Twisted Evil
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@under a new name, it was scotland and an unexpected bonus Toofy Grin
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You have all been extremely helpful, and I think it's totally and hilarious obvious that everyone is itching for the season to start!

It's great advice about hiring the QST's from Snoworks as a reference point and then trying to find shops which will let me demo some of the skis mentioned in this thread. That's going to be the way forward for me. You've made good points about my ability being at a sort-of transition point, and I'll know more about what I like soon enough. I'm gathering from everyone's comments that this particular range of skis (around 100mm waists) is very much about personal preferences, which is probably why I've found reading reviews online so baffling.

I figure that since I have all of the equipment for waxing and edge tuning, a double ski bag etc, it wouldn't be too bad to haul around 2 pairs of skis. But it's interesting to read in your comments that "off piste" in the Alps will not mean piles of powdery snow, but likely still mixed and firm conditions. So that argues for a quiver-of-one. On the other hand I do like a precise ski on piste, as some of you have noted, so it's going to mean trying wider skis and just seeing what I enjoy.

This has been really useful for me, I have a plan now. Thanks to everyone!
snow conditions     
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Get yourself to an Oktobertest if you can

Pick out 3 brands *2 different widths

I'd suggest Whitedot Altum 94/104
Dynastar whatever the Cham series is now called
Blizzard Rustler or Cochise/ Bonafide

Remember you are testing there for how livable and fun they are in compromised conditions. Something that is fun to chuck about on the variable confines of a fridge rarely disappoints outside.

FWIW I consider the benchmark skis in the 1 oh something width range to be the Soul 7 (softer easier going end of spectrum) and the Cochise (more grunt more metal but still pretty versatile) and then the Cham 2.0s (subsequently Legend?) to be the ski that covered the bandwidth for 90+% of skiers.
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@Dave of the Marmottes, yeah good call, if you go to the indoor test, ski the mankiest snow you can find off to the side of the scraped off areas as well as the smooth bits!
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@kitenski, ah, well that’s very nice then!

And sunshine? That’ll date it to March 19, 2018, between 1:32 and 1:36 then?
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So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
I have to admit I’m not entirely sure what the point of the Rustler range is - seems to broadly duplicate the Brahma/Bonafide/Cochise geometries.

But I haven’t investigated at all.
snow conditions     
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
kitenski wrote:


I'm agreeing with the 2 points, you can carve much cleaner lines and therefore ski faster on piste, with a <80mm ski, it's also perfectly fine (if your technique is) in off piste, crud, until it get's really deep.


The only caveat is that piste specific skis tend to be stiff and can be a handful off piste in soft snow / powder. I used to ski my 66mm Atomic slalom skis off piste but more because that is what I had with me than for pleasure. The other thing to bear in mind is a ski doesn't know how tall you are, but does know how fat you are. The OP is relatively light if I understand these pound things correctly so will be okay on a shorter or narrower ski than someone heavier.

I would probably do the course and hire the skis recommended by the instructors before launching into buying skis, given the course is in December, unless there are some real bargains to be had.

But yes, an <80mm all mountain ski might be a better bet.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Klamm Franzer wrote:
In my humble opinion, anything wider than 80 is so boring on piste that it will spoil your day. You have mentioned that you find the powder/all mountain skis uninspiring on piste - which they are. Slow to respond and with a turning arc like a super tanker, they will suck the joy out of your well deserved skiing break. They will make light work of any off piste you come across, so if you plan on skiing in deep stuff, try a few pairs. Don't discount 'normal' width skis though; these days skis are wider than in the good old days and are generally quite acceptable in powder, especially if you are not spending all day in it.

Have you noticed in the last few years when people post helmet-cam videos of themselves skiing *amazing* powder, the 100+ wide skis make it look like they are skiing on a normal piste? If they were on narrower skis, they'd sink a bit and the effect would be more dramatic and everyone would be more wow than yawn.

Sorry for the rant - ski chat is my nemesis! Get some Head Magnums or Titans and be done with it, everything else is vanity unless you are Ted Ligety or Glen Plake. wink


Ah the noughties called, they want their fat skis suck 'tude back!

The war has been fought and sensible compromise won. People who believe that anything over 80mm is unacceptable on piste or that a 120mm+ ski is perfectly fine on icy piste are on the lunatic fringe.

Just as a postscript I'd be wary of taking definitive unbiased ski advice from Snoworks - they very definitely have a commercial arrangement in which they shill for Salomon wink
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 Poster: A snowHead
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Yes @Dave of the Marmottes, I figured that Snoworks was pretty cosy with Salomon. I was thinking of hiring from Duch Sports in Tignes Le Lac, which seems to get good feedback around here. They have several of the skis that have been mentioned in this thread so I've dropped them a line to see if they can sort me out for the week.

I'm going to try to get to that Oktobertest at Hemel, even if the snow isn't comparable to skiing outside it sounds like a fun day.
snow conditions     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
As you can tell from the above answers, there are no "Perfect Solutions".....but only the right Compromise that suits your needs.

Your choice will depend on:

1. Your Ability/Weight/Aggressiveness/Preferences/Goals
2. Whether you decide on a Quiver
3. How much Off Piste you (realistically) intend doing (as a percentage of your total time)
4. How often you go

The best ski for On Piste, is a Piste Ski. The best ski for Off Piste is a Freeride Ski - unless you always ski in waist deep powder.

All Mountain Skis are getting more versatile every year....and imo even they can be split into AM/Piste bias (80-84) and AM/Off Piste bias (88-95).
The characteristics you need in a Piste Ski (including a fairly full Camber/Tight Radius) are at odds to what you want in a dedicated Powder Ski.....and a Freeride Ski is different again. An AM Ski tries to design in elements of both On and Off Piste skis, so is a compromise.

The upshot of all this, is none of us can tell you what you need - we can only tell you what we prefer (and why)....and what you are likely to get, when you go down a particular path.

What you want, is also likely to be influenced by how easy/expensive it is to get more than one set of skis to a resort.

Having spent most of my skiing life on a ski with a Full Camber - I find that on my Scotts, which have an AM Front Rocker and a 92 mm waist....Considerably harder On Piste, to get the tip to engage and thus have to work harder to push them into short turns (and much slower edge to edge). The upside, is they can handle every condition with ease and are happy doing Long Turns at decent speed all day long. They are also surprisingly good in the bumps.

You pays your money and you makes your choice - which requires testing different options.


Last edited by Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person on Fri 20-09-19 18:26; edited 1 time in total
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Go to Northern Japan, Wyoming, or Utah.

Go where the offpiste is deeper, dryer, and lighter.

Much better for learning and earning.

Surfing 10cm of wet sludge that has been tracked out by 930am in Europe is no fun.

Head for the US or Japan.
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
@Whitegold, you are a lady's front bottom.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@diaphon, I think I'd re-iterate my advice, if you're on a course, don't get distracted by kit unless you don't like what you're on.

You can play with kit when you have time to play with it.
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
under a new name wrote:
@Whitegold, you are a lady's front bottom.

Naa, the guy is often right but he lives in a world of his own, and really wants us all to know it.
I am glad for him that he can afford all that but with a bit of common sense and being down to earth he should have understood that most of us hang around in a completely different milieu andthere is no way we can take his advices into consideration.
But probably he gets immense pleasure in showing us what to do if winning the lottery. Razz
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@drporat, seriously?

when has he ever been right?
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@under a new name, won't you rather do a powder trip to Japan instead of hoping for good days at the bashes?
I know I would. Contemplating the PSB once again
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
under a new name wrote:
@drporat, seriously?

when has he ever been right?

@drporat is unfailingly polite.
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
@Old Fartbag, indeed. I tought myself to shut up if I can't find something good/useful to say.
It's against my inner nature but it's nicer this way.
That is, until I fall because a fat boarder decided to stop on my skis.
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