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So where does this come from?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Hi all,

It took me not too long to work out what a "bluebird day" actually is, but what I've been wondering now is where does this seemingly meaningless phrase come from?

Your guess is as good as mine...or hopefully better!

Cheers,

Puzzled Gixxerniknik. Puzzled
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Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
First time I heard it was from folks in the USofA. I presume we copied it along with Pow, Dude, Gnar etc
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
As friend of mine 'bluebirds' every year, he locks up the house in blighty and spends the 3 winter months in Miami. Not sure if there is a correlation between that and a 'bluebird' day.
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It's not the day the bluebirds fly over the white cliffs of Dover?
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Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
IIRC, they're called bluebird days because it's such a nice day in the mountains that it could be the end of winter and that the bluebirds could be returning.
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Yep, first time I heard it (and I confess to using it occasionally since) was also in the US (on Aspen TV snow report to be exact). No idea of the origin though, sorry
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Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
And there's me thinking its because there sky is blue as are the birds.
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gixxerniknik, it doesn't mean much - but then again means everything - in relation to the White Cliffs of Dover.

Good weather - on the mountains - or bluebirds - at the conclusion of war - kind of sum-up freedom, don't they?
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Thanks guys! So, to recap it's a pretty irrelevant phrase which originated across the pond as it were! The best I could come up with is blue sky day where we're floating like birds whilst skiing in the powder, which I knew couldn't really be correct!

Anyway, here's to more of them!
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Seeing as this thread is as clear as mud, how about the origin of "Gnarly"?

Any what does it mean? I have tried describing various situations and events and they are all Gnarly, everything is Gnarly according to my kids.
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I reckon Gnarly is anything that the user can't be arsed to describe properly.
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And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Blimey, I sound just like my parents...how did that happen!
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gandie wrote:
... how about the origin of "Gnarly"?


I seem to remember that word being current when we were editing Skateboard! magazine in 1977-8. Could go back a bit before that ... probably from US sport/extreme sport media of that era.
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You know it makes sense.
gixxerniknik wrote:
Blimey, I sound just like my parents...how did that happen!
Toofy Grin
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
gandie wrote:
........... how about the origin of "Gnarly"?


Used by mountainbikers since at least 1998 wink
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Comedy Goldsmith,

gnarly (adj.) Look up gnarly at Dictionary.com
1829, "knotted and rugged," from gnarl (see gnarled) + -y (2). Picked up 1970s as surfer slang to describe a dangerous wave; it had spread in teen slang by 1982, where it meant both "excellent" and "disgusting."
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I think that I am getting to be a bit of a curmudgeon, but one hip skiing "word" which drives me almost apoplectic is "Pow" when is it is used to indicate that the individual is a gnarly, off-piste "rider" (and that's another word I loathe Evil or Very Mad )
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Quote:

I presume we copied it along with Pow, Dude, Gnar etc
That'll be the Royal 'we' then I assume.
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I just thought pow is an abbreviation of powder, as in "Like he's a real gnarly dude in the pow man." er... Puzzled
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"Like he's a real gnarly dude in the pow man." er... Puzzled[/quote]

You could say the words of that sentence in any order and it would mean the same, that is sick!
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Wicked! Twisted Evil
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gandie wrote:
Seeing as this thread is as clear as mud, how about the origin of "Gnarly"?

Any what does it mean? I have tried describing various situations and events and they are all Gnarly, everything is Gnarly according to my kids.


everything according to my nearly 13 year old daughter is either "peak" "beast" or "swag" don't have a clue what any of them mean and not sure I dare ask.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
I avoid anything like 'pow', 'dude', 'gnar' etc. as I don't want to sound like a semi-literate dope-head teenager.
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andy wrote:
It's not the day the bluebirds fly over the white cliffs of Dover?


Not unless a tornado sucks them up into the jet stream in Georgia and wisks them across the Atlantic.

Pretty sure it refers to a bright early spring day that sets them off singing, but like the birds we'd be better off without this and other Americanisms...
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All language evolves, education has little to do with it.
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gixxerniknik wrote:
Thanks guys! So, to recap it's a pretty irrelevant phrase which originated across the pond as it were! The best I could come up with is blue sky day where we're floating like birds whilst skiing in the powder, which I knew couldn't really be correct!

Well no, not if the "There'll be Blue birds over/ the white cliffs of Dover" song, previously mentioned a couple of times is the origin. That's a wartime British song (1941).
The Urban dictionary says it is "An expression often used by out-of-date ski bums and boarders" but gives no origin.
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Well, the song made popular by Vera Lynn was actually written by a Septic. I always wondered what a bluebird was as there isn't such a bird native to the uk. I suppose it could be a reference to the song (in being a hope for better times to come) but I doubt it, I suppose we've just got to wait for our US of A friends to wake up to give us the definative answer!
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So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
Quote:

The Urban dictionary says it is "An expression often used by out-of-date ski bums and boarders" but gives no origin


...pfft, grody...
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You know it makes sense.
gixxerniknik wrote:
actually written by a Septic.
Poor fellow - hope he gets out of his tank soon.

Wikipedia: " The song was written about a year after British and German aircraft had been fighting over the cliffs of Dover in the Battle of Britain: the song's lyrics looked towards a time when the war would be over and peace would rule over the iconic white cliffs of Dover, Britain's de facto border with the European mainland.
"The White Cliffs of Dover" is one of many popular songs that use a "Bluebird of Happiness" as a symbol of cheer, although there are no bluebirds in Dover (the bluebird is not indigenous to Britain). Nat Burton, the lyricist of the song, was an American who had never been to the place. But, the song captured the feelings of the Allies about protecting Britain from the planned German invasion."

Also Wikipedia: "A popular American song of 1934, "Bluebird of Happiness" by Sandor Harmati and Edward Heyman, was recorded twice by Jan Peerce and also by Art Mooney and His Orchestra. That song is probably the origin of the American phrase "the bluebird of happiness," which is also mentioned in the film K-Pax and alluded to in the song "Over The Rainbow" from the "Wizard of Oz."
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Bring back 'rad'!
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and Tubular!
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ansta1 wrote:
As friend of mine 'bluebirds' every year, he locks up the house in blighty and spends the 3 winter months in Miami. Not sure if there is a correlation between that and a 'bluebird' day.

Those who head for Florida are generally called snowbirds.
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