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Better boots?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
I've had problems for years getting a boot to fit becuase I'm short (5.0') and the cuffs are always too long (even women's) so that flexing is jolly difficult. I have to be quite aggresive even on shallow slopes. So I was wondering about 'custom fit'. I've come across Profeet in London who make a charge of £99 for fitting and aligning. Has anyone out there used them and if so, was it worth it? Any other suggestions?
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Jane, definitely worth it. A number of snowHeads, including me, have posted about profeet and I can't recall a negative comment. The posts are spread about a bit, so I would do a search from the 'user Facilities' menu. I can't recall your particular problem being mentioned though, but hopefully someone will respond here.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Jane, I wonder if the problem is that your boots are too stiff, rather than the cuffs too long; I assume that you are pretty light. I know very little about boots, but it is not immediately obvious that the height of the boot up the leg will compromise flexing, unless of course it's uncomfortable on your shins (or knees or thighs or wherever the cuffs bear).
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Please don't abuse me if I am wrong here, but I am looking at it from the scientific side rather than the boot side. But a longer cuff should allow you to flex the boot more, as you should be able to apply greater leaverage to the ankle joint. Also, by applying the same force over a larger area of tongue you should feel less pressure on your shins.
Maybe it is that your boots are just too stiff as suggested by richmond, just something to think about.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Big G, the cuff needs to be shorter for women. They tend to have larger calf muscles than men, and to accomodate this the cuff needs to be shorter.

Jane, if your feet are small enough, you may want to try junior boots. (I ski with a few ladies who are in juniors, some of them are instructors)
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Wear The Fox Hat, Sorry, Embarassed maybe I was using the wrong terminology, what I meant was that if the shaft? (the tube that goes from ankle to calf) was longer then flexation should be easier.
I am aware that the cuffs on womens boots are cut away at the back to allow for the longer calf muscles but what I inferred from Jane's, post was that she had problems flexing the boots, not with pain in the back of her leg from a high cut cuff. I know of this problem as one of by mate's wife foolishly borrowed a male friends boots because they had the same sized feet, and lasted precisely 1/2 a day on the slopes before she had to give in and go and hire boots due to crippling pain in her calf muscles.

Maybe Jane, could confirm which of these to effects are the actual problem.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Big G, yeah, ok, but the thing is, in her first sentence she says that "the cuffs are always too long"
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Wear The Fox Hat, So does "cuff" only refer to the padding at the top rear part, or the whole of the lower leg "shaft". Only my understanding of the word cuff refers to something that encircles either wrists or legs. Hence my assumption that it refered to the entire "shaft" not just the padding at the back Confused . Please can you clarify this so I don't make the same mistake in the future. Smile
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Big G, cuff normally refers to the plastic outer shell. It may, or may not, have a rear spoiler, which in some boots can be removed. The inner (the soft bit) is the liner.
One of the drawbacks of Zipfit and similar custom liners is that they tend to go higher up the calf than the standard liner.
Anything to help!

Possibly the best option is to stretch her legs by a few inches. Twisted Evil
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Wear The Fox Hat wrote:

Jane, if your feet are small enough, you may want to try junior boots. (I ski with a few ladies who are in juniors, some of them are instructors)
I was told that this is a big no no. My first wife badly broke her leg skking in junior boots and we were told by the hospital in France that the type of boot was a contributing factor (and the fact the bindings didn't release!)
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
Quote:

Possibly the best option is to stretch her legs by a few inches - of if only that were possible!! It's the type of surgery I might go in for. In an

In answer to the length of cuff point - I think it is the length of the shin/calf/cuff whatever you call it that's the problem. The whole thing I think comes too far up my leg (though in fact it's only just above mid calf). I take your pointBig G, about a longer cuff giving more leaverage, but I think the stiffness of the boot outweighs that advantage. Yet mine are quite soft compared with a lot of boots. Perhaps I'm worrying about it too much as I don't have a problem when I'm on steeps or at speed. It's just when I want to ski fairly gently on shallower/slower slopes - I go to bend ze knee/can't too it/out comes bum/ and sometimes I'm thrown off balance if not concentrating. I am quite light (50 kg but increasing!) and only 5'. It makes sense that the boot could be shorter because presumably the height of an off the shelf boot is aimed at the average (who all seem to be about 5'8" to me!) I don't have any problem with pain in the calf by the way.
I saw a Warren Smith video that suggested you should be able to drive your knee forward when flexing so that when you look down your knee is nearly over the front binding of the ski. I can hardly get mine past the first clip on my boot!!
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Jane, how about getting your boots softened?
(I recently had mine made more flex-friendly, and it has helped)
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
You can buy Strolz boots in Austria (and in Scotland too) that are made to measure. My boots have short, narrow cuffs. It was one of the first things that was pointed out that I needed, although I'm 5'6" and have long,lean calf muscles (due to horse-riding). When your boots are done up, there should be virtually no space between your boots and legs.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
Jane, It's not only short women who have this problem. Many men also seem unable to flex their boots adequately. Lack of flexion WILL ALWAYS prevent you moving from intermediate to advanced ski-ing. If you can't flex your ankles you can't put enough pressure on the ski for it to flex and turn adequately.

For your problem I suggest the following:
1) Try childrens' boots as suggested by WTFH
2) Cut away as much of the plastic around the buckle housings as possible to allow the boot to flex more easily (a bit drastic but it works).
3) Try to get hold of an old pair of rear entry boots - they're much more "flexion friendly".
4) it's the ANKLES you have to bend - not the knees!

Hope you get it sorted out. I don't think the length of the shaft is the problem, unless you find it uncomfortable - your boots are just too stiff for you at the moment.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Thanks guys. It's interesting to hear that other (taller) people have similar problems. I'm thinking of trying profeet (different thread.) I assume they will help sort this out.
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Try touring boots, shorter cuff, lighter, softer and work OK in alpine bindings
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
rich, Good idea. Very Happy
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