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Boots

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Was thinking of getting some boots for my upcoming trip. I've been twice now, but have always had hire boots. Does it make a massive difference to have your own boots?

I've already been fitted up at Snow & Rock, but I wasn't sure with the fitting. My left foot was fine. However, my big toe on the right foot was pressing (slightly) against the end of the boot. Is it better to have a left foot with a boot too big, or a right foot that is slightly too small?
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
m00958, yes having your own boots makes a big difference, however it is often better to get boots in the resort because if you find when your're out there that they don't fit properly it will be a lot easier to persuade the shop that sold them to you to do something about it than if you buy them in the UK, some people have had problems with the quality of S&R boot fitters, some are very good whilst others are really only sales staff, unfortunately only an experienced skier can tell the difference
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
It certainly does make a big differnce having boots you are confident with. But you really must be confident in their fit. I think there has been a thread on this before - no doubt someone will pipe up. I really do not like the sound of one boot being to small though. I would have thought that it would be better to have one boot slightly to large - perhaps compenstated for by custom liners and buckling. Boots that are too small can cause great pain.
I agree with DG Orf regarding getting boots at the resort.
EDIT Just noticed this is the snowboarders' forum. Never boarded. Not competent to comment. I can do absent minded Embarassed


Last edited by Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see? on Wed 19-01-05 21:08; edited 2 times in total
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
There's only one reason I was getting fitted up at S&R.... I have a mate who can get me Salamon gear at trade, but I need to find out what size I am first. Might pop back and see if there's someone different in doing the fittings.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
But this is the snowboarding section, it's not like ski boots. Apart from needing my foot beds for arch support I can hop in pretty much any pair of soft boots, but, hard boots or ski boots are another thing entirely. An upside with plastic shells is they can can be pushed while soft boots basically can't.

It's not like 5 or 10 years ago, hire stores have good kit by and large. So having your own probably has less to with fit than with ski boots and more to do with other stuff, like what bindings you want to use.if you buy a board. Might be worth holding on buying boots until you're buying a board as well.
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
m00958, definately get your own boots before getting any other piece of kit. Make sure you try on as many pairs as possible in 1/2 sizes up and down whatever size they think you are. Also a size 10 in one boot will not necessarily be a 10 in another. Also wear a pair you think comfy for about 15 mins around the shop. Keep the tags on if you buy and wear in the house for a while to get them used to your feet, take them back if they don't feel comfy. Don't get any boots too small or too big. Hopefully you tried on some with a heat mouldable liner and wore them for about 15 mins to get the liner to mould to your foot. Remember that the boots will stretch to your foot over time, mine toes are at the end of my boot but it doesn't cause me any problems when boarding.

I think quite a few of the boarders round here use Salamon boots and i've only heard positive reports. Personally i use the Dialogues and think they are brill, the heat mouldable liner and the locking laces are superb. If you are using straps then the boots you get wont necessarily matter too much but obviously with steps in, you need a specific boot to match the binding, flow tend to work with most boots but best to try and buy at same time if you can afford it.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
If one boot seems bigger than the other, it is possible that you have one foot slightly longer than the other?
Anyways, I believe it is a good idea to buy your own boots. There are three things you have to consider:
1. Comfort - they should be as comfortable as possible.
2. Heel lift - with the boots tied tightly, and wearing socks that you would wear for boarding, simulate a toe-side turn. You heels should not lift up, or should only lift very slightly.
3. Durability - especially around the lace-up area, and around the toe of the boot where your board will be resting on the lift.
Also, if you are still having trouble with the foot thing, maybe try wearing a bigger sock on the smaller foot? Or alot of boots come with liners that form to your foot with heat - this might solve the problem as well.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Go for bigger boots. No point in having a pain in your big toe! You can always effectively reduce the boot size on the smaller foot by inserting a foot bed liner. I supply these free with most of the boots I sell at www.bargainboards.co.uk This then gives the customer the option to use them or not. Inserting one footbed liner can have the effect of reducing the boots size by about a half. You can always insert more liners if needs be. You can always pack a boot out a bit with liners and thicker socks but there is not much you can do, no matter where you bought the boots from, if they are just too small.
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