Ski Club 2.0 Home
Snow Reports
FAQFAQ

Mail for help.Help!!

Log in to snowHeads to make it MUCH better! Registration's totally free, of course, and makes snowHeads easier to use and to understand, gives better searching, filtering etc. as well as access to 'members only' forums, discounts and deals that U don't even know exist as a 'guest' user. (btw. 50,000+ snowHeads already know all this, making snowHeads the biggest, most active community of snow-heads in the UK, so you'll be in good company)..... When you register, you get our free weekly(-ish) snow report by email. It's rather good and not made up by tourist offices (or people that love the tourist office and want to marry it either)... We don't share your email address with anyone and we never send out any of those cheesy 'message from our partners' emails either. Anyway, snowHeads really is MUCH better when you're logged in - not least because you get to post your own messages complaining about things that annoy you like perhaps this banner which, incidentally, disappears when you log in :-)
Username:-
 Password:
Remember me:
👁 durr, I forgot...
Or: Register
(to be a proper snow-head, all official-like!)

Immense fear bordering with horror

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Quote:

I didn't really get I was supposed to stop by turning. I wasn't told that.

That's one of the biggest mistake of your instructor!

Now that you know, you should give it another try, with a different instructor.

You can stop by turning uphill till you are so slow you almost stop. (granted, you'll start sliding backwards). So turning to control speed is the key.

In the ski school I used to work, we emphasize turning techniques. Plough are for at the lift where there's no room to turn.
snow report
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
niki250 wrote:


I'll just refuse to leave the bunny slope until I've mastered stopping. I haven't experienced anything scarier than running straight down a 1,5 km slope not knowing how to stop and not knowing how to fall with my huge skis. I paid for 4 classes and didn't even learn how to get up. The instructor wouldn't bother actually showing it. When I think about it she did show it to my bf. Guess I was a 2nd class student. Laughing

Maybe the instructor thought you were too good to fall. wink
Seriously, it sounds like you were very unlucky in your instructor. Most are very sensitive to the fears of beginners.
Falling is part of skiing and hopefully you will quickly learn how to get up and unlike roller blading on tarmac,/concrete snow is a fairly soft and painless to fall on.
ski holidays
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
1. keep going-better days ahead!
2. you had a horrible instructor and that is not rare, unfortunately. Here you can learn of the right person, depending on where you go next.
3. understand and accept that skiing can be not very fun early in the learning process, because you suck and are mostly unsuccessful-all of us were. But the day comes when the light clicks on and you are hooked.
4. keep in mind that skiing is like some other things in that speed is your friend, not your enemy as each beginner thinks. It is much harder to ride a bike at 2 kph than at 15, and skiing slow is difficult and energy-sapping. This is why I teach people to stop/slow/avoid very early in the process. It is easier to go if you know how to stop.
5. ideal way to improve is by skiing with a buddy who is better than you but also patient. For me, this was massive.
6. master a slope you are comfortable on. Ski it like you own it, be confident there. Get some wins, get your mojo. Then try steeper slopes. Build on success.
7. the learning phase goes fastest if you can get some concentrated reps in. A day here and there is better than nothing but prolongs the not so fun part.
ski holidays
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
to early to take you off the nursery slopes. So that is down to the instructor.
You are probably better off having instructions separate from your partner where you can both go at your own pace
snow report
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@niki250,
Quote:

I'm 19 year old person who tried skiing for the first time last year. I went to the mountains with my bf, who snowboarded his whole life. He wanted to learn skiing too so we booked semi-individual classes. First day on a bunny slope I was better and I loved it. The next day, however, the instructor took us to a proper slope. I was scared out of my mind. I thought I could stop with plough through a 1,5 km long slope. I didn't really get I was supposed to stop by turning. I wasn't told that. I raced down the mountain a lot of times. I still get sweaty palms when I remember that feeling. I could imagine myself laying unconscious at the end of the slope, since I honestly believed I'd just race all the way down.


Quite natural to be afraid of heights and slopes you think you might not be in control on. As others have said, an appropriate instructor, beginner slope, decent bit of snow and you'll soon have the essential skills you need to begin to feel confident.

The time to worry is when you no longer think there's any danger out there. Keep calm and carry on. Look forward to hearing on here about your future progress. snowHead
snow report
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Maybe an idea could be to look at joining a snowHeads bash for your next ski trip (assuming one coincides with your holiday plans).

Not only would you likely be surrounded by lots of supportive snowHeads, depending in which bash you elect to go on, there are opportunities to have lessons in a friendly and helpful environment.

Of course, much depends on how Covid affects next seasons plans, but it is just a thought….besides, the bashes are great fun and, possibly a great way to help overcome your first (bad) experience.

I recall and End of Season Bash (EoSB) many years ago where there were a group of beginners (first ski holiday) and they all progressed really well…and had loads of fun into the bargain.

Whatever you decide, good luck and stick with it snowHead
ski holidays
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...

http://youtube.com/v/kwWxu1pDiW4

I hope leaving links is allowed. This is the first slope I went to after the nursery slope. I thought it would maybe be interesting to you to see where our instructor took us.

I get really sweaty looking at this video.
snow conditions
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
If my wife gave up after the first bad “experience”, we wouldn’t have any kids today Cool
The right teacher is important, and you need to feel safe to be able to evolve as a skier - Do not hesistate to ask the ski-school for another teacher if you don’t feel confortable. Go out there and enjoy skiing!
snow conditions
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Slopes are categorized as blue, red and black here. There are no greens. This one is supposed to be blue but is intersected with the red one as you can see on the sides.

The big downhill, with just lovely view of the entire mountain and heights, is where I started accelerating, trying to stop doing plough.
ski holidays
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Totally get this and have been there too (must say quite a lot of females also have this confidence issue; I don’t know why). My username conveys how I always feel when skiing. Like I’m out of control and a bit crap. My husband films me know to prove that it’s ridiculous as I’m quite capable. That said if I get to a ridge and stop and look down I’ll quickly convince myself I can’t do it. Answer is not to stop!!

It’s a fundamental connection to make that turning is effectively your brake. That should have been conveyed more clearly.

My advice would be if possible to head to your nearest indoor ski slope. I have a dry slope only a few miles away but it hurts so much when you fall that it makes me tense up. And fall. If you can get some private lessons on real snow I’d say do that. As regularly as you can and up to when you go. That way when you’re in resort the whole process of boots on, using a lift etc is very familiar.

Don’t be put off by a bad first experience. I still don’t like to go fast - and don’t think I ever will. I tootle along behind my family or even off on my own now and get down with plenty of turns. And that’s the key; nail your parallel turns, get a good balanced rhythm and you’re in as much control as you can be.

I’m also frightened of flying and it was getting far worse until my husband pointed out if I allowed it to develop further, we would be unable to travel the distances I like to see and that really snapped me out of it. Same conversation with skiing. If I allow my fear to control then i’ll have to stop ski holidays. And that’s not happening!

Good luck. Don’t give up. Practice and lots of it. Natural remedy drops under the tongue can help. Also download Fear of Skiing hypnotherapy if that’s your thing.
snow conditions
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
We all have fear at some stage in learning, and beyond. You have two competing advisors in your brain, one is telling you this is dangerous and the other is logical and can advise you how to deal with the situation.

When you are learning the logical advisor has little advice, and the fear monger has control. This can paralyze you in some situations.

As you pick up technique and ability, your logical advisor is able to overcome the fear monger.

You always have the fear monger there, which is why your blood pressure goes up and adrenalin starts pumping.

If you find the pace of learning is too fast for you, you might want some extra practice on the beginner slopes. Just gaining the confidence on the basics can often be enough to help you progress.

In group learning the pace of the group is often led by the slowest in the group. Some people learn fastest by confronting fear, others learn in a more gradual process.

I would suggest in further group lessons, you go to the level in which you would be the best skier. Feel what it is like being the most confident skier in a group. Then when you get bored, ask to move up a level and change groups.

Learning how to fall is probably the best way to remove fear of falling. If you push yourself on the beginner slopes so you fall, you will get used to it and get better at falling. We all fall when learning, this is how you learn to fall.

The same can be said for life. If you never fall over in life, you will not advance to steeper slopes with knowledge on how to pick yourself up and carry on. Learning how to fall safely is critical!
ski holidays
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Old Fartbag wrote:
IMO. The least
- The Resort choice and how good it is for beginners
- The Equipment...make sure it's of good quality; the boots are a decent fit, yet comfortable and the Skis are suitable for your standard
- A huge amount of skiing is confidence - so as you start to gain some....don't let better skiers take you on Pistes above your ability - which can easily set you back to square one. Keep to where you have skied with your Instructor
- Remember it's a holiday and not a boot camp - so enjoy the mountains and the restaurants they have to offer


I'd agree with all of the above + everything that @bambionskiis said. She might be me!!

Such a shame that your first experience was poor through no fault of your own. Well done for wanting to go again. Sounds like you are fit and athletic and got other skills that will help. But don't under estimate the impact of fear, as it can make you tense up which never helps. I have been skiing for years and some days I 'dance' on a slope, swooshing and loving the feel, other times I look like I have just come out of ski school, traversing all the way across, with slow jerky turns and my back bottom out! It is ALL in my mind! So maybe do some work before you go to work out through the fear? Once in the snow, take it easy, enjoy it, look at the scenery, learn your piste map. If you 'like' people join a group lesson as often you get camaraderie, which might suit you? Also it can be a confidence boost, if you progress very quickly as you compare yourself to other beginners not people who have been doing snow sports since childhood.
latest report
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
Quote:

(must say quite a lot of females also have this confidence issue

I've noticed that in lot of other areas of life too.

Quote:

I still don’t like to go fast

It makes me happy to hear that controlling the speed is actually possible.



Quote:

Learning how to fall is probably the best way to remove fear of falling.

Again, I thought it wasn't even possible to fall. I absolutely sucked but fell only once not even on the slope, and the second time I just was so afraid that I made a squat. I guess I didn't do it right, since I never fell and actually believed I can't possibly fall.

I'm really not afraid of falling thanks to the rollerblades, but I just don't know how to fall.
snow report
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
Hi niki250, what a horrible experience you have had, all caused by a very bad instuctor. No matter what level you achieve, skiing is/should be fun, as any sport you do should be. If you roller blade well, you will have a base to learn to ski (with a good instrctor). You have balance, coordination and know what it feels like to "slide" (roll on blades). The big problem you have now is in the mind.

When you ski next, go to the ski school office (ideally the day before you want to ski) and explain the terrible time you have had. They should then be able to find some one to give you good instruction.
If you can (safely) look around the nursery/bunny slope and lifts. Imagine roller blading down it, make it your friend. Break it down in to small sections of 20/30 meters. Falling off a mountain is very difficult you will fall over first. Do you roller blade along a street and crash in to street lights etc, try it, I bet you cant Smile

I guess your rollerblade boots are a close fit, like a glove, so you can feel and transmit to and from your blades, through your feet. Ski boots are them same, spend as much time as you can trying them on in the hire shop. You are the customer.

You will fall over while learning, as you get better you still fall over, you will just be going faster when you do.

The snowplough is only to help you with balance, it is no good for stopping. Most instuctors try and have your skis in a "V" shape for a snowplough, not everyone can do this (it hurts sometimes), try your skis in a "\ /" so the tips are a bit wider, you will still have good balance as your feet are in the same position.
Turns keep your speed down, imagine drawing big S shapes in the snow, the further across you go the slower you get, you pick up speed as you start to go down the hill again, a little bit of speed is good. Smile

You can overcome your fear with a good instuctor.

Many years ago, I had a 50 year old lady who had, had a very bad experience with a poor instuctor while skiing in France. She came to the dry ski center I worked at and was shaking with fear. After an hour she was snowploughing 10 meters backwards down a very gentle slope, with some confidence in her ability.
snow conditions
 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
@niki250, Having watched the Video you posted - my thoughts would be as follows:

1. That is a reasonable gradient to take someone on, in their first week of skiing - provided they have learned some basics on the beginner area. In Fact, in some French resorts, it would be labelled Green.

2. What can make it more difficult/scary, would be factors like:
- How crowded it is - especially with erratic Beginners, or Advanced skiers buzzing past unnervingly close
- Skis that are too advanced for your level, making turning difficult
- Poor visibility
- Icy or slushy conditions
- State of mind/lack of confidence - leading too tensing up, which causes you to do all the wrong things
- Unhelpful instruction

3. With a mixture of Traversing and Turning - it can be skied very slowly indeed.

4. The right Instructor would have you coming down there - where after a day or two, you'd be wondering what all the fuss was about.
snow report
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Well on the bright side at least you had snow.

This was Kopaonik when I went there:-

ski holidays
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Quote:

it would be labelled Green

Definitely not intended to be skied down only with plough. Laughing Instructor just shouted PLOUGH PLOUGH PLOUGH the whole time. I mean maybe it's possible but I'm not that strong.

Quote:

This was Kopaonik when I went there

Looks even scarier!


Last edited by Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person on Mon 20-09-21 10:49; edited 1 time in total
snow report
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Maybe it's worth noting that I was also afraid of the chairlift since I never was on one. I really panicked. I liked it so much at the end and I could probably only ride chairlifts all day, but I didn't know that before I tried it and it made me even more nervous.

I kinda hoped we would go to the nursery slope again but she just took us right to that scary (to me) one even though I'm aware that it's not that scary ...

Edit: It probably didn't help that it was labelled as red. I just saw red and thought I wasn't going to make out of it alive. All the drama in my head!!!
snow conditions
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
niki250 wrote:
Maybe it's worth noting that I was also afraid of the chairlift since I never was on one. I really panicked. I liked it so much at the end and I could probably only ride chairlifts all day, but I didn't know that before I tried it and it made me even more nervous.

I kinda hoped we would go to the nursery slope again but she just took us right to that scary (to me) one even though I'm aware that it's not that scary ...

Edit: It probably didn't help that it was labelled as red. I just saw red and thought I wasn't going to make out of it alive. All the drama in my head!!!


You thought it was scary, it doesnt matter what anyone else thinks about it.
latest report
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@niki250, I think the slope in the video looks ideal for someone graduating from a beginner slope to be honest. In fact it quite reminds me of the first proper slope we took my son on when he was just shy of 4. I agree with a lot @Old Fartbag, says above though.

There are people for whom skiing is just not the right sport. Actually this applies to most/any sports. But reading your profile based on what you are posting I don't think that's the case with you. I think you just got a completely $h!t instructor. So I would seek out recommendations for a good instructor and then base a trip around being with them. Doesn't particular matter if it's private or group lessons.
snow report
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Quote:

just shy of 4

4 years old fearlessness is probably the best thing about being 4 years old. Very Happy


Quote:

You thought it was scary, it doesnt matter what anyone else thinks about it.

Thanks for this! I feel a bit stupid for regarding the slope as the scary one though. But on the bright side my bf was scared too, so maybe I'm not such a coward after all.
snow conditions
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
niki250 wrote:
Quote:

it would be labelled Green

Definitely not intended to be skied down only with plough. Laughing Instructor just shouted PLOUGH PLOUGH PLOUGH the whole time. I mean maybe it's possible but I'm not that strong.

I totally agree that it shouldn't be totally skied in a wide Breaking Plough.

Rather than try and explain - I would strongly recommend watching the series of Beginner Video Clips by Darren Turner that I linked to - where he shows the progression from using the skis in a V, to quietly come down in smooth, controlled, loopy S-Shaped turns....and then quietly drop the V and let the skis run parallel.

This will at least give you an idea of how it should work and how to progress.
ski holidays
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
niki250 wrote:
Quote:

just shy of 4

4 years old fearlessness is probably the best thing about being 4 years old. Very Happy

TBH he is quite risk adverse, his younger sister less so. The point really was just to say I don't think there was a problem with the slope, more likely the person instructing you down it.

niki250 wrote:
Quote:

You thought it was scary, it doesnt matter what anyone else thinks about it.

Thanks for this! I feel a bit stupid for regarding the slope as the scary one though. But on the bright side my bf was scared too, so maybe I'm not such a coward after all.

Different slopes are intimidating at different stages of your development. Sometimes you may be on the wrong slope (for your current abilities) but even then there are tools, ways and means of working through it. Which is where a good instructor, or indeed skiing partner, can help. Obviously it's better not to get on the "wrong" slope but it can happen to the best of us.
snow conditions
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
niki250 wrote:


Thanks for this! I feel a bit stupid for regarding the slope as the scary one though. But on the bright side my bf was scared too, so maybe I'm not such a coward after all.

If you take nothing else from this thread - the big message, is that what happened to you was not your fault; you are not a coward, or stupid - and much of what you felt is perfectly normal/natural....it's just how it's managed, that's important.

Any slope can make you scared - if you don't have the technique to manage it; or your confidence has been so shattered, that the technique you do you have, vanishes.

Almost everything to do with Ski Technique is the opposite of what your body wants to do (which is guided by fear, that makes you want to pull away from the slope).
snow report
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Sounds like your instructor/ski school

If you weren't learning as fast as your other half, that happens - sounds like he was very quick on the uptake, in which case they should have moved him to a different class as parallels on day 2 doesn't in general happen; first week is usually a week of thigh bursting snow ploughs for a few days, progressing to stem turns later (snow plough to start the turn, moving skis parallel through the turn)

If you have balance and co-ordination, which it sounds like you have (as you rollerblade), you'll crack it easily, no problem!
ski holidays
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
buchanan101 wrote:

If you weren't learning as fast as your other half, that happens - sounds like he was very quick on the uptake...

IME. As skiing is easier with a bit of speed - What often happens, is blokes are often happier to let this happen and don't mind being a little out of control; whereas the fairer sex (my good lady very much included), don't want to let the skis go at all, until they have full confidence that they will have full control. As skiing very slowly is much harder (at any level), learning can thus take a little longer.

What I also see, is that Ladies often ski more technically correctly (and are better than they think) - as they listen better (just not to their partners!) and do exactly as they are told....whereas blokes are inclined to just go faster than they are technically able to control, to chase the adrenaline rush (and are not as good as they think).
snow conditions
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Old Fartbag wrote:
buchanan101 wrote:

If you weren't learning as fast as your other half, that happens - sounds like he was very quick on the uptake...

IME. As skiing is easier with a bit of speed - What often happens, is blokes are often happier to let this happen and don't mind being a little out of control; whereas the fairer sex (my good lady very much included), don't want to let the skis go at all, until they have full confidence that they will have full control. As skiing very slowly is much harder (at any level), learning can thus take a little longer.

What I also see, is that Ladies often ski more technically correctly - as they listen better (just not to their partners!) and do exactly as they are told....whereas blokes are inclined to just go faster than they are technically able to control, to chase the adrenaline rush.


Excellent points. My OH was just like this, and was actually technically a lot better skier after a week than she thought she was.

Her sons just charged, and were technically not that great back then.

Loss of confidence can make you sit back, in which case you have very little control which gives you even less confidence. It's a vicious circle, but the instructor should get you through that taking you on appropriate slopes and giving you the correct exercises
latest report
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
buchanan101 wrote:
Old Fartbag wrote:
buchanan101 wrote:

If you weren't learning as fast as your other half, that happens - sounds like he was very quick on the uptake...

IME. As skiing is easier with a bit of speed - What often happens, is blokes are often happier to let this happen and don't mind being a little out of control; whereas the fairer sex (my good lady very much included), don't want to let the skis go at all, until they have full confidence that they will have full control. As skiing very slowly is much harder (at any level), learning can thus take a little longer.

What I also see, is that Ladies often ski more technically correctly - as they listen better (just not to their partners!) and do exactly as they are told....whereas blokes are inclined to just go faster than they are technically able to control, to chase the adrenaline rush.


Excellent points. My OH was just like this, and was actually technically a lot better skier after a week than she thought she was.

Her sons just charged, and were technically not that great back then.

Loss of confidence can make you sit back, in which case you have very little control which gives you even less confidence. It's a vicious circle, but the instructor should get you through that taking you on appropriate slopes and giving you the correct exercises


Or as one French instructor barked over and over when teaching us carving “accept the speed!” Laughing

He was right to be fair, but not everyone was willing to accept the speed.
ski holidays
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
I just want to thank you all one more time. Before posting on this forum I honestly thought I'd never try again.

Your advice meant a lot since I didn't even know that my gear wasn't right, for example. It's just a stupid way not to learn skiing. I was blinded by the fear. I kept saying that my foot is sliding in the boot but the instructor just unpleasantly ignored me saying that it's my fault because I'm not getting the technique right (?!). Is that even possible?

I'm eager to try again, and I'll definitely closely watch the videos you guys linked!
latest report
 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
niki250 wrote:
I just want to thank you all one more time. Before posting on this forum I honestly thought I'd never try again.

Your advice meant a lot since I didn't even know that my gear wasn't right, for example. It's just a stupid way not to learn skiing. I was blinded by the fear. I kept saying that my foot is sliding in the boot but the instructor just unpleasantly ignored me saying that it's my fault because I'm not getting the technique right (?!). Is it that even possible?

I'm eager to try again, and I'll definitely closely watch the videos you guys linked!


I missed that bit about the boot sliding. You have to have your heel fixed in the right place. The most important buckle on a standard 4 buckle boot is the lower one on your leg - it has to hold your heel back and not let it move. The boot should be snug all over and it should not slide, but that lower buckle is the most important - do it up first. The instructor was talking b0ll0cks.
snow report
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
niki250 wrote:
I just want to thank you all one more time. Before posting on this forum I honestly thought I'd never try again.

Your advice meant a lot since I didn't even know that my gear wasn't right, for example. It's just a stupid way not to learn skiing. I was blinded by the fear. I kept saying that my foot is sliding in the boot but the instructor just unpleasantly ignored me saying that it's my fault because I'm not getting the technique right (?!). Is that even possible?

I'm eager to try again, and I'll definitely closely watch the videos you guys linked!


Your foot should DEFINITELY NOT be sliding in the boot. Next time you go, it's worth spending a while at the hire shop to make sure it fits correctly.

There will be lots of variations around foot width and instep, but in general, when your boot is on and the buckles done up, if you stand up straight, your toes should be touching the end of the boot. Your toes should only come away when you bend your knees and lean forward into the boot.

Also don't try to make the boot fit by over tightening the buckles. The buckles on the foot part aren't there to make the boot grip your foot, they are just there to provide a seal so no water gets in.
latest report
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
admin wrote:
Just as important as length, is stiffness.


Toofy Grin
snow report
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@niki250, your experience sounds very similar to my first week of skiing. We were a group of 5 friends. As 3 of us had never skied before and the other 2 had done a week when at school (many years earlier), we were advised that getting a private instructor for the 5 of us for the week would be a good idea. What a mistake! It quickly came back to the 2 who had skied before, the 2 others did ok and I struggled.
We only spent an hour or so on a nursery slope before our instructor decided to take us up the mountain. I hadn't even mastered snow plough. He then brought us down a green run, that was actually a narrow mountain road. I was terrified and ended up just skiing holding on behind him. One of our group met some new people, as the only way he could stop was skiing into them (slowly). The week didn't get any better from there. (This was Borovets, Bulgaria).
Fast forward a year, we went to Passo Tonale and were all in ski school. For me ski school was a horrible experience. I was clearly bottom of my group, and the instructor definitely didn't teach to the slowest person. I was just made to feel bad by the instructor, who shrugged his shoulders and said things like "maybe next year." I wasn't in the bottom group, but at no stage was there any suggestion of moving groups (which is often stated on here as something that ski schools always do - I'd not assume that).
Anyhow, after a lesson in a snow dome with a more sympathetic instructor, I started to enjoy skiing, and was skiing reds the next year. (It could just have easily been a private lesson on a real mountain). I was still terrified of skiing mountain roads (usually marked green or blue) several years later, even when I was skiing most other slopes. The damage of that first day took a long time to subside, but now I can enjoy mountain roads, which are often very scenic.
ski holidays
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
DanishRider wrote:
If my wife gave up after the first bad “experience”, we wouldn’t have any kids today Cool




Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
latest report
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@niki250, This is the Skiing equivalent of an AA Meeting.....Where you think your problems are unique to you, insurmountable and that somehow it's all a personal failing....until you actually find out, that you are very much not alone in what you have experienced.

This Forum is predominantly populated by Skiing enthusiasts, who simply want to share what they know, so others can enjoy this wonderful sport as much as they do...and in return are able to access a deep well of information, that is useful to them.

Please use this as a resource - and feel free to ask any question, no matter how stupid you think it is. It will have been asked before.
snow conditions
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Quote:
no matter how stupid you think it is. It will have been asked before.
...and will be asked again Smile
snow report
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@niki250, 3 rather underrated moves / techniques I think are useful, although I’ve been skiing almost 40 years and rarely use them nowadays.
Hockey stop
Side slip
Controlled fall, as an emergency stop and evasive action, eg to try to avoid an imminent collision.

Worth checking them out IMO, eg on YouTube and incorporating them into your learning, next time you ski.
ski holidays
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@niki250, it would be interesting to know if you were taught an hockey stop (emergency stop), how to side slip and how to arrest yourself in a fall?

These were all things I was taught very early on and are invaluable/essential tools to be used and help to build confidence and security on the slopes.
ski holidays
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@niki250,

The fear you felt when using the chairlift for the first time, will have also impacted on you. This happened to my partner the first time they used a chairlift, it was caused as they are afraid of heights!

Again, the instructor is at fault - NOT YOU. She should have talked to you about how to get on/off the lift - instead she was probably having a ciggy with one of her mates. Sad rolling eyes
snow report
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
I echo everything that has been said. I first skied at the age of 26 and was pretty scared for much of the time on the first, second, third and a few trips after that too! This wasn’t helped by poor quality instruction- if only someone had explained WHY you make certain movements and the mechanics of what I was trying to achieve, it would have been so much better.

Your instructor sounds like she was pretty dreadful and just couldn’t be bothered. Next time you go, try to do some research beforehand about the instructors with good reputations and who are good with beginners.I guess you were skiing in Serbia and I think it’s unlikely that any snowheads on the forum will be able to make recommendations as not many of us have skied there. If however you venture into a resort in France, Italy , Austria or Switzerland, then someone here may well be able help you out with some names of good instructors.

Skiing is never a cheap activity.Rent some beginner skis, have a few more lessons-private if you can afford it, but on your own, not with the bf. Alternatively take group beginner lessons. DO NOT let your bf try and offer you advice and DO NOT agree to any offer he makes to take you up the mountain to ski an easy blue run. It will end in tears at best, and murder at worst! There is nothing wrong with wanting to practise on slopes you have skied with your instructor.

You should probably use hire boots for a few more sessions if they are not too old, but the problem is that it is hard for you to know. After investing in lessons, your first big purchase should be getting boots professionally fitted. They really do make a huge difference.

And finally, stick with it. Was your experience just over one or two days? Like most Brits, after about 3 one hour lessons on a dry slope, I went for a week’s ski holiday (a total 24 friends and friends of friends-crazy!) to get to real snow for the first time. I was scared most of the time, ached all over but I LOVED the whole experience.
You sound really sporty and I bet you will be zooming about with far more confidence after a few days.


Last edited by Ski the Net with snowHeads on Mon 20-09-21 16:22; edited 3 times in total
snow conditions



Terms and conditions  Privacy Policy