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Self-sealing all season tyres?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Is it just me or all season self-sealing tyres are pretty rare beasts?
Neither Michelin Crosslimate nor Conti AllSeasonContact seem to have this option, at least not for my size 225/50/R17

The only ones I could find are Pirelli Cinturato All Season Plus Seal Inside

Is there something fundamental that makes it hard/impossible? May be seal deteriorates in negative temperatures? Couldn't find absolutely anything on the topic.

Does anyone have anything good or bad to say about the Pirelli? Winter/Summer performance in general and self sealing in particular.

PS
My car doesn't have a space for a spare, so not an option.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Do you mean run flat tyres? If so these are not self sealing, they just have reinforced sidewalls which means even low or no pressure means they hold their profile.
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Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
I thought the self seal was generally just globbing Tyreweld in them when they flat, pumping up and driving on. Then apologising to the guy who has to remove them to do a proper repair.
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@ansta1, no, not run flat. The tyre contains a compound that automatically seals most punctures.

A bit like the goo @Dave of the Marmottes suggests, but it's already inside, so the tyre never deflates in the first place. Unless the damage is very serious

Continental's version is called ContiSeal. Michelin has its own and so does Pirelli.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
The inside of the casing is coated with a soft sticky (tar like) layer that self seals when punctured. It's not liquid/runney like tyreweld.
However the reason I've come across it is a couple of customers have brought tyres for slow puncture repairs and they've turned out to be these... QED
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@Oleski, @adithorp, okay, not something if I'm honest I knew about. would worry me personally as if the tyre doesn't deflate then you don't necessarily know you have an issue that could present itself in another manner. I'd rather know of an issue and make a choice as to my response. eg Runflat low pressure, nurse it to somewhere I could replace. Genuine flat, repair and nurse it to somewhere I could replace. Unless these are rated to run at full speed rated for vehicle and tyre until the tyre is worn out then it would worry me personally. I like to know if something is broken/fixed/fudged.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@ansta1, that's why all new cars are required to have a TPMS tyre pressure warning system.
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After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Alastair Pink wrote:
@ansta1, that's why all new cars are required to have a TPMS tyre pressure warning system.


Sure but if it seals it before the TPMS goes off, buy bad fortune, then you have a bit of gloop holding that gap or hole together, probably okay if it's part of a run flat system as you've got a backup. So puncture, gloop stops the leak, if the gloop fails, then you've got runflats and tpms as a backup. If that's the case then in most cases it'll be fine and dandy.
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@oleski What car do you have and what's your tyre spec'? Some of the feedback can be a bit more focused and less general if we know the specifics.

The aim of runflats and any self-sealing technology is to keep you going only long enough to get to safety/ get home/ get a replacement. Once the integrity of a tyre is compromised, you really want to replace it. Quality premium tyres are made up of as many as 600 different individual bits, so while the final vulcanisation makes it look homogeneous, there are lots of interfaces and changes in compound internally. The advantage of the self-sealing tech seems mainly to be that it obviates the need for the extra sidewall stiffening in run-flats that some performance car owners complain degrades handling. If you don't have a performance car, then run-flats have very little impact on handling, and do a good job of keeping you going, plus the TPMS should tell you that you've had a failure.
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@LaForet, Seat Alhambra.

I thought the point of self-seal is that you don't bother with minor punctures. How would I notice one anyway if it's sealed and doesn't let the air out. It's not like I am going to check my tyres all over every day
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Quote:

I thought the self seal was generally just globbing Tyreweld in them when they flat, pumping up and driving on. Then apologising to the guy who has to remove them to do a proper repair.

This - but only if you're lucky and have a teeny weeny simple puncture. My last three experiences of punctures (one on a snowy alpine road - hit the jagged edge of a typical winter pot hole, pulling over to the right to let the ski bus pass) and one in a hired car driving to Geneva airport in the dark and rain, late at night, and one when driver (not me!) hit a kerb too hard) all resulted in damage WAY beyond what any gloop or self-seal system would cope with. The only on easily dealt with was the last - in our own car. Fitted spare wheel, back on the road in no time. That car had come equipped with a stupid Space saver tyre but it saved no space - its housing, under the floor in the boot compartment, easily housed a full size spare, so we'd replaced the Space Saver immediately after buying the car.

The other two punctures were hired cars equipped with gloop and caused huge delays and inconvenience. The last puncture in my own car was driving over a nail entering the covered garage at my apartment in France. I changed the wheel (on a concrete floor - it would have been a different matter on a snowy roadside) and drove gingerly (because I am always slightly nervous about whether I've done it right) to Albertville where garage swiftly mended gloopless damaged tire for 20 euros.

When I last changed my car I had very few "must have" requirements, beyond air conditioning and an occasional 7 seats. But a proper full size spare was one of them - it sits in a cage below the car, fitted on purchase, for not too much extra money. Makes a filthy job of changing it, though! No way would I willingly drive a car without a spare. We had to change a wheel in the garage in France once when we discovered a completely flat tyre. That was a Sunday and I discovered that NOWHERE was open to buy a new tyre on a Sunday. We asked at the French/Swiss border and the response to the idea that anything so wickedly sinful could be done on a Sunday was sharp!! I was nervous driving home without a spare - we stopped at Macon and bought one there, before driving on.

Punctures don't happen very often but when they do they can cause major delays if the simple expedient of changing the wheel isn't possible. And this is supposed to be progress!

End of rant. Laughing
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
<shrug> I've no problem with people buying and carrying around spare wheels. On the other hand I would rant if I was forced to do the same.
For my car you'd need two, and I'm pretty sure you could not get a pair in even using all available luggage space.
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So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
philwig wrote:
<shrug> I've no problem with people buying and carrying around spare wheels. On the other hand I would rant if I was forced to do the same.
For my car you'd need two, and I'm pretty sure you could not get a pair in even using all available luggage space.


Hence run-flats or just a single space-saver wink

I think the point f the tyreweld is to get you home/garage and then replace not repair.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
@oleski From the Pirelli website:

'Seal Inside™ is an innovative technology developed by Pirelli ... The technology allows the tyre to avoid pressure loss and to maintain its integrity after a puncture, enabling the driver to carry on driving without having to immediately replace the tyre.'

I think that the key word here is 'immediately' - like run-flats, it's not intended as a permanent fix. Just good enough to avoid a catastrophic shredding of the tyre while in motion, and giving you enough mobility to get home then get the tyre replaced. Having checked, I read it doesn't need TPMS (á là runflats) so as you say, how are you going to know you have a problem? With runflats, the tyre deflates enough to trigger the TPMS warning.

When I go to the Alps on my winter runflats, I carry a spare tyre but not a wheel. I can use the empty space inside the tyre for storage and it ends up not taking up that much extra room. This is on the principle that winter tyres are mainly manufactured in the autumn, as stock for the winter. It's much less of an issue to barrel-up to a tyre place asking them to fit my spare tyre vs sourcing one (which might take time for the exact size, let alone an exact match of brand). In the summer, I don't carry a spare on the principle that getting a replacement isn't going to be too tricky. Also, my winter setup is 'square' (eadch wheel the same size) whereas my summer setup is 'staggered' (rears are bigger then fronts).
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Quote:

which might take time for the exact size, let alone an exact match of brand

I find French tyre places often find some techy reason to make you buy two tyres if one needs to be replaced, because of regulations about identical tyres on each axle. The useful technical French word to describe a tyre which cannot be repaired is foutu. wink One I discovered long ago, shortly before being told I would have to buy two. After running off a ferry at Le Havre and finding a flat - must have been damaged as we drove onto, or off, the ferry. So that meant pulling out of the queue, getting all the baggage out, changing that wheel and then, as it was "foutu" and the remaining tyre didn't match anything the guy had in store, buying two..... rolling eyes If we'd not had a spare it would have been an expensivet ballache having to wait around in Le Havre ferry port for hours whilst somebody sourced and delivered a new tyre (or two.....).
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
I completely shredded a Michelin Cross Climate last year, I'd only had 2 fitted a short while before. Had to fit my run flat by the side of the road, not fun. Fortunately they're very common and I only had to wait a few days, good for France where things usually take longer. Bizarrely I had to pay a delivery charge, if it had been 2 it would have been free.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
LaForet wrote:

When I go to the Alps on my winter runflats, I carry a spare tyre but not a wheel. I can use the empty space inside the tyre for storage and it ends up not taking up that much extra room. This is on the principle that winter tyres are mainly manufactured in the autumn, as stock for the winter. It's much less of an issue to barrel-up to a tyre place asking them to fit my spare tyre vs sourcing one (which might take time for the exact size, let alone an exact match of brand).


That seems like a very sensible idea (if as you say you are using runflats so that you can carry on driving to a tyre place). Smile
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