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So what happens if skiers contract CV19 on holiday?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
LaForet wrote:
@caravanSkier Yes, one to add to the list. But, wouldn't you need proof of such an assertion? Something like an official 'Covid Safe' Certificate? I don't think the present UK authorities are anywhere close to this sort of arrangement, but I suppose they may be by 2021 (...on reflection and past record, it seems unlikely). Is this the same as the Covid Passport idea that seems to have been forgotten?
.


I think the idea has been thrown away because we can not really hope to have proof of any long term immunity for quite some time yet, or even concrete proof of complete immunity whilst antibodies are present. Covid19 has simply not been around long enough. I obviously want to believe we (having had it) will never be able to catch it again! However the best I can come up with is that it seems likely we will not be re-infected whilst we still have the antibodies, but the evidence is not yet robust as far as I can determine.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Given the worrying high proportion of new age nutters who say they won't have a vaccination perhaps there is mileage in a vaccination certificate (like I used to carry around the world - yellow fever, etc.) It would at least prove that the holder has done what they can to contribute to herd immunity.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
I think corona viruses are more like "the common cold", though, in that being immune to one variant doesn't really count for much.
If it did, then anyone who had had the thing could just get on with life, certificate or not.

I'm thinking it's more of a long term issue, like the cold.
Perhaps we need to work out what the transmission vectors are much more precisely to reduce incidence.
Then it's probably more a case of reducing the risks after the inevitable infection. Which is why my NHS mates have all lost weight wink
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
pam w wrote:
Given the worrying high proportion of new age nutters who say they won't have a vaccination perhaps there is mileage in a vaccination certificate (like I used to carry around the world - yellow fever, etc.) It would at least prove that the holder has done what they can to contribute to herd immunity.


Yes, people of a certain age can remember carrying that small yellow innoculation booklet along with passport. Even for a trip to Greece, parts of Spain and Austria (yes, even Austria), I used to nip down to British Airways travel clinic in Buckingham Palace Road to get my jabs - typhoid, yellow fever and others and malaria tablets for the tropical places. Some countries wouldn't let you in without such proof, some airlines wouldn't let you board without it. No vaccine can be 100% - I suspect, just like the 'flu, the Covid vaccine will be 50% effective - if true, that 50% would have a dramatic downward effect on the R number so it won't be foolproof but it will be worth doing.

Quote:
new age nutters who say they won't have a vaccination
- that's why Bill Gates is personally delivering it via 5G masts. Didn't you know?
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Quote:
So what happens if skiers contract CV19 on holiday?


They go downhill fast?
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
philwig wrote:
I think corona viruses are more like "the common cold", though, in that being immune to one variant doesn't really count for much.
If it did, then anyone who had had the thing could just get on with life, certificate or not.

I'm thinking it's more of a long term issue, like the cold.
Perhaps we need to work out what the transmission vectors are much more precisely to reduce incidence.
Then it's probably more a case of reducing the risks after the inevitable infection. Which is why my NHS mates have all lost weight wink


The common cold is a set of symptoms, caused by a variety (hundreds) of viruses. It's a bit like vaccinating against an "upset stomach" - you might address one cause, but there's dozens of others.

COVID is caused by a single virus which, so far, has shown minimal mutation. As such, at least theoretically, it should be possible to vaccinate against it.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wrote:
Common human coronaviruses, including types 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1, usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold.
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/general-information.html

We we're agreed at least that the common cold is a type of coronavirus.


snowdave wrote:
... COVID is caused by a single virus which, so far, has shown minimal mutation. As such, at least theoretically, it should be possible to vaccinate against it.

I'm not sure what you mean by "theoretically".

Either it's stable enough for a vaccine to be effective, or it's not. My example was to point out that it may well not be.
That it doesn't mutate whilst wildly successful isn't suprising.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
philwig wrote:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wrote:
Common human coronaviruses, including types 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1, usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold.
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/general-information.html

We we're agreed at least that the common cold is a type of coronavirus.


Nope, we're not agreed on that.

The common cold is a set of symptoms (possibly an illness, but colds differ quite a lot) not a virus.

It MAY be caused by a coronavirus, but may be caused by many other viruses. The rhinovirus group is more common that coronaviruses.
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
I think the key point is that all the current research is pointing to T-cell based immunity, including cross protection from exposure to previous common cold coronaviruses, playing a major role in resisting serious illness with Covid-19, and explaining why the young (who typically have lots of colds and show a very strong T cell response) do so much better than the elderly (who have weaker T cell responses and rely more on antibodies built up over the years).
The T-cells response is very long lasting eg those exposed to the 2003 SARS have shown immunity to the SARS-CoV-2, not antibody based but T cell based.
As T cells effectively take out the infected host cells, not the virus itself, they don’t need to be so precisely adapted to each individual virus mutation, ie common cold and 2003 SARS T-cells are effective against the Covid-19 virus. But antibodies are much more precisely matched, so take longer to develop and lose effectiveness as the virus mutates.
The Oxford vaccine is reported to be showing both strong antibody and T-cell responses during its development.
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
My gut feeling in all this, is that in reality my wife and I are probably going to have to write off next season. The writing is on the wall. Johnson has effectively closed down Austria and Croatia today, I feel that Germany and Switzerland will be next. We're approaching the end of August and December the traditional start of the season is effectively just round the corner. This pandemic is going to be around for a while yet. Overland travel by car is going to be Impossible and I don't fancy taking our chances by flying out. I think skiing in many of the resort's will be for a few locals on a hand full of operational lift's. Insurance implications are a factor particularly with factoring in the possibility of a no deal situation with Brexit which will invalid our EHIC cards. Skiing trips will not be considered as essential travel effectively making travel insurance policies all but useless. In reality my best hope of making tracks this coming season will be in our
local Cumbrian/Yorkshire hills with our touring ski's and skin's. In effect we'll be watching this space and praying for a miracle. Very uncertain times for us all for quite a while yet me thinks.
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
@Snowbandit56, I'm pretty confident the ski areas will be reasonably busy here this forthcoming season. Certainly plenty of German guests, probably Dutch, Danish and Czech too. Brits? Who knows, they are a small portion anyway. It might not be as busy as a normal season, but I'm confident it will be enough to keep the industry afloat.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Scotland should be safe too, as long as there are no more travel restrictions. It’s just when/if the conditions are any good ?
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