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Knee pain after skiing

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Total longshot here. Maybe someone can help.

I'm a snowboarder and after a 12 year hiatus, have spent the last 2-3 short breaks skiing but now my right knee starts to hurt after a days piste skiing (blue/red cruising). It gets quite hot and enflamed i n the evening. I don't get anything like this when I snowboard and am concerned I'm doing damage to it.

I'm assuming it's my technique, or there lack of. Leaning too far back? Any other possible causes? Lack of strength? Is this something I just have to live with?
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Quote:

It gets quite hot and enflamed..


Doesn't sound good. Get it checked by a Physio who knows about skiing.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@LittleBullet, it could be a number of things based on your age, how you're skiing and so on. Inflammation is a sign of damage or 'insult' but I assume by "damage" you mean long-term damage.

I would go and see a physio and maybe ask if they have someone who specialises in sports injuries as well. Given that your snowboard doesn't cause pain it could be lateral movement of the knee that is the problem when skiing but that's just my best guess. It might also be wise to see a boot-fitter as your knee might be being pushed into an awkward direction perhaps? I wouldn't bother with a walk-in centre as their job is to get you through the next few days until you can see a GP/physio. It's best for fractures and short-term management of the pain and if necessary referral to the nearest A&E.

Personally, I always stretch off after a day's skiing: it sounds obvious but last year I went touring for ~10 days and I found that my performance in terms of fatigue was much worse after not stretching. I also do yoga (not 'practise'!).

I would also caution reading into too much on the internet. The answer whenever I see patients who have is almost invariably a) heart attack or b) cancer. It can be helpful to have an idea of what it could be along with a dose of common sense so the internet can be helpful. Nhs.uk is a very good site and they've put a decent whack of money into it. WebMD also has a good reputation. The rest I would either avoid or approach warily.
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You need to Login to know who's really who.
LittleBullet, going back to a previously enjoyed vigorous activity after a long break is always risky.
You are no longer the athlete you were: muscles have weakened, ligaments have tightened, but your brain still remembers what you used to do.
Result is you break things.
I did the same recently with running, and got terrible achilles tendonitis.
Now, you need to see a medic or physio for some proper professional advice
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Physio is def the way to go imo. My physio diagnosed that my knee pains were actually caused by tight leg muscles. Sports massage and stretching sorts me out.
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You'll need to Register first of course.
not really much to go on saying your knee burns & feels inflamed.

Is it the whole knee or a localised area?
How long does the pain last for afterwards?
Do you do/take anything to help with the pain?
Is it Ok the next day until you start to go again, how long does it take before the pain comes back?
Is this your leading leg? can you ride switch & see if the other leg is the same?

Have you tried anything like adjusting binding angles & gap between your feet?
Have you tried knee support/compression support?
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@Mr.Egg, the OP has the problem when skiing not when boarding.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
I've got a friend with knackered knees. He got a ski mojo and says it really helps. It basically gives you spring loaded knees. Quite expensive but they do work. If you can't fix the knee it's worth looking at.
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
LittleBullet wrote:
I'm assuming it's my technique, or there lack of. Leaning too far back? Any other possible causes? Lack of strength? Is this something I just have to live with?

Definitely NOT something you have to "live with"!

First, get the "hot and inflamed" under control. (It's not clear does it go away when you're not skiing. If not, you need to go see some "professional")

Once that done, go see a GOOD boot fitter!

There maybe some biomechanical issue with your skeletal that could be addressed with proper boot fitting. With luck, that may be enough to stop the issue from reoccurring.

In any case, properly fitted boots are necessary for control of the skis. Without that, your "technique" are at best compromised, worse distorted. So it's only after you got boots fitted that you can start down the road of skiing with "good" proper technique in earnest. Take some lessons, words on screen are confusing at best when it comes to learning to "do" physical things.
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Ski the Net with snowHeads
@everyone, thank you for your inputs. Really appreciate it. Too much to answer to so please take my word for it. You've all been very helpful. I'll try to answer some of your main points sat at the bar on my phone...

1. Pain does go away the next morning. I 'poked' it in the evening and it was on the inside of my leg just behind the top of my kneecap.

2. Last two days skiing no inflammation or hot feeling in the evening. A little achy but nothing serious. Lots of stretching in the evening and focus on skiing technique.

3. Boots are brand new rossi's from rental shop. Never worn. Super comfortable.

4. I'm early 30s and trying to ski like I think I used to as a teenager. Not cool. I'm also overconfident 'reading' terrain due to my snowboarding. I purposely dialled it down. Less aggressive skiing, more breaks, shorter pitches.

5. Our instructor who told me to "twist" at the hip, face down the mountain, stop bending forward and use less pressure on outside ski. I feel like twisting at the hip takes loads of pressure off the knee. Not sure if this is true, but I don't care that's how it feels!

6. Yesterday first time off-piste skiing ever. Large powder covered moguls were fun and ok on the knee. Today's long flat 'bouncing' turns very hard work and knee started heating up, I usually fall or lose rhythm after turn 6-8.

7. Carving on blue and greens is fun. Short radius turns on hard packed or icy steep reds and blacks knee starts to heat up.

8. I'm going to the physio for a check-up when I get home.
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@LittleBullet, I'm not an Instructor - but given your knee problem, where the terrain allows, I'd be doing more "Crossover", GS type turns, remaining "Stacked" by allowing your upper body to follow your skis round. Angulate more from the hips and less from the knees....which should take pressure off the knees.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
My left knee has got hot and swollen after a few days skiing (not fast, aggressive stuff, either, and my technique is generally OK-ish) for the last 40 years. You can feel it through a thick pair of denim jeans and occasionally through salopettes. I take ibuprofen (though that is now not allowed with one of the other medications I am taking) and ice it. And wear a donjoy brace.
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
@Old Fartbag, yeah I think that's pretty much what I'll have to do. Shame, I would have considered investing more time into skiing but snowboarding is just easier on my knee.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
Remember that ibruprofen can inflame the stomach if taken regularly, especially if you don't combine it with food. And that those over 50 become increasingly likely to need to take a stomach anti-inflammatory with ibruprofen to avoid persistent long term damage to their stomach. Be aware that other over-the-counter medications like Neurophen+ also contain Ibruprofen. Caveat: I'm not a medic so anything you doctor tells you obviously supercedes this advice.

As mentioned, go to a qualified physio first: this will identify if you have any inherent physical issues as the root cause, and if so, hopefully a remediation regime. I did this last year after back issues, got the issue identified in detail by the physio, a set of exercises specific to the muscle group involved, and haven't had an episode since.


Last edited by You know it makes sense. on Fri 13-12-19 12:28; edited 1 time in total
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Forget the talk of painkillers, change of skiing style, technique, etc and get yourself to a physiotherapist so they can work out what the problem is.

Once you know what the problem is, then you can start figuring out what you need to do to fix / manage / minimise it. Until then it's just guesswork and speculation.
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