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Feedback much appreciated

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Hi all, I am a beginner/intermediate boarder and would really appreciate some feedback on my riding. I know I am doing lots of things wrong but I am not quite sure what.


http://youtube.com/v/__1WTCLV6Ag

http://youtube.com/v/7M6-uzbyHW0
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
1. Get off the board, and strap on some skiis
2. Look at number 1!

Could’t help myself Toofy Grin Laughing
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Shoulders on the heel edge is the one that really pops out. When you do your heel edge turns, you collapse at the waist and your shoulders come over the toe edge of your board - this is stopping you from getting all your weight on the heel edge. Tense your core and let those shoulders descend towards the snow.

Your movement patterns would be the second thing - it looks like you're using up-unweighted, but it's a very quick pop-up before edge change and on the down there's not much movement.

Finally, your flex. You look quite locked in the knees and ankles, and it looks like you're absorbing exclusively through the waist.

It looks like you're steering nicely with your feet, although you could get your upper body more in-line for really flowing turns. Can you take video a bit closer so we can see what your feet are doing a bit better?

If you've not yet been taught any of that and want more explanation then just shout Smile
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
I think the main thing is, as he said, bend your knees more.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
AdamNotts wrote:
Shoulders on the heel edge is the one that really pops out. When you do your heel edge turns, you collapse at the waist and your shoulders come over the toe edge of your board - this is stopping you from getting all your weight on the heel edge. Tense your core and let those shoulders descend towards the snow.

Your movement patterns would be the second thing - it looks like you're using up-unweighted, but it's a very quick pop-up before edge change and on the down there's not much movement.

Finally, your flex. You look quite locked in the knees and ankles, and it looks like you're absorbing exclusively through the waist.

It looks like you're steering nicely with your feet, although you could get your upper body more in-line for really flowing turns. Can you take video a bit closer so we can see what your feet are doing a bit better?

If you've not yet been taught any of that and want more explanation then just shout Smile


Hey, thank you for your reply!
- So on my heel edge, my back should be straight?
- Would you be able to explain your points regarding movement and flex a bit further for me, please?
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.

http://youtube.com/v/qsd8uaex-Is

Check out that video - especially the section at 2:30 - you do that. At 4:15 he explains what it should be - really emphasise the lifting of the toes and clenching of the shin muscles.

When you move into more advanced snowboarding you'll (often) want to introduce a movement pattern. The movement pattern will be appropriate to the terrain you're on - the snowdome is pretty much the most mellow terrain there is, so you can get away without a movement pattern here, or if you do use one, it can be very subtle.

The two patterns are up-unweighted (you rise before changing edge to take weight off the board, and sink through the turn to absorb forces) and down-unweighted (you suck your board into your body to unweight it, and push out against the snow throughout the turn).

Well worth having an instructor teach you those in person - you need to know when in the turn to use those movements.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Shins are the key. On your toe side you look like you are standing on tip toes. This is a common mistake and means you will have no flex left in your legs.

Create the pressure with your shins rather than your toes. This is much more relaxing too.
snow conditions     
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
AdamNotts wrote:
http://youtube.com/v/qsd8uaex-Is

Check out that video - especially the section at 2:30 - you do that. At 4:15 he explains what it should be - really emphasise the lifting of the toes and clenching of the shin muscles.

When you move into more advanced snowboarding you'll (often) want to introduce a movement pattern. The movement pattern will be appropriate to the terrain you're on - the snowdome is pretty much the most mellow terrain there is, so you can get away without a movement pattern here, or if you do use one, it can be very subtle.

The two patterns are up-unweighted (you rise before changing edge to take weight off the board, and sink through the turn to absorb forces) and down-unweighted (you suck your board into your body to unweight it, and push out against the snow throughout the turn).

Well worth having an instructor teach you those in person - you need to know when in the turn to use those movements.


Hey! I tried out your advice and the videos on the slope today. The whole time I have been snowboarding previously I have never felt stable on my heel edge. So today I really focused on pressing my shins to lift the board up and keeping my back straight. It felt a lot better and more stable, however it also felt like I was learning to snowboard again. I also tried to be more flex on toes keeping my shins forward and hips forward, the only problem I found was that I would turn sharply as I push my shins in.
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
lyamhutch wrote:
AdamNotts wrote:
http://youtube.com/v/qsd8uaex-Is

Check out that video - especially the section at 2:30 - you do that. At 4:15 he explains what it should be - really emphasise the lifting of the toes and clenching of the shin muscles.

When you move into more advanced snowboarding you'll (often) want to introduce a movement pattern. The movement pattern will be appropriate to the terrain you're on - the snowdome is pretty much the most mellow terrain there is, so you can get away without a movement pattern here, or if you do use one, it can be very subtle.

The two patterns are up-unweighted (you rise before changing edge to take weight off the board, and sink through the turn to absorb forces) and down-unweighted (you suck your board into your body to unweight it, and push out against the snow throughout the turn).

Well worth having an instructor teach you those in person - you need to know when in the turn to use those movements.


Hey! I tried out your advice and the videos on the slope today. The whole time I have been snowboarding previously I have never felt stable on my heel edge. So today I really focused on pressing my shins to lift the board up and keeping my back straight. It felt a lot better and more stable, however it also felt like I was learning to snowboard again. I also tried to be more flex on toes keeping my shins forward and hips forward, the only problem I found was that I would turn sharply as I push my shins in.


Hi, I have tried to follow yourself and the advice of the video, and have uploaded a few more recent clips. Would you be able to give me some feedback on these?


http://youtube.com/v/xo_iUEhrPnw&feature=youtu.be

http://youtube.com/v/ikeUofEEPyk&feature=youtu.be

http://youtube.com/v/JYp65KNdn-w&feature=youtu.be
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
lyamhutch wrote:
... I have never felt stable on my heel edge. So today I really focused on pressing my shins to lift the board up and keeping my back straight. It felt a lot better and more stable, however it also felt like I was learning to snowboard again. ...

it's called the "expert beginner". You spend time perfecting the wrong thing, but because it's "the wrong thing", you can't get any better until you go back to do the right thing... which you have not yet perfected.

Your heel side still looks particularly ropey - you're not bending your knees still. But I would not worry about it, take some lessons, get an idea of how it should feel, then put a hundred days in and it'll be good.
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
For snowdome you're golden. Better go on real slopes and get a few hours of lessons for carving. For now - spend time on kickers, rails and boxes instead.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Get a private lesson from Tom Nicholson at Chill Factore. He's a GB boardercross coach and a great instructor. I had him for a day developer lesson and it was the best lesson I've ever had. He's hard to get hold of for those full-day developer lessons if you specifically want him (and CF can't guarantee anyone even if you specifically request them) so book a private lesson with him. In 2 hours, your movement/technique will be completely different, and you can then work on the corrected technique. He's all about performance carving. Think I will be booking some private lessons with him before I head out to the slopes in January.

Good idea about posting videos for critique. I might do the same, though I need someone to film me... Very Happy
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
philwig wrote:
But I would not worry about it, take some lessons, get an idea of how it should feel, then put a hundred days in and it'll be good.


This, especially the last sentence .......
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
What @DanishRider said
More fun, more future.
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