Ski Club 2.0 Home
Snow Reports
FAQFAQ

Mail for help.Help!!

Log in to snowHeads to make it MUCH better! Registration's totally free, of course, and makes snowHeads easier to use and to understand, gives better searching, filtering etc. as well as access to 'members only' forums, discounts and deals that U don't even know exist as a 'guest' user. (btw. 50,000+ snowHeads already know all this, making snowHeads the biggest, most active community of snow-heads in the UK, so you'll be in good company)..... When you register, you get our free weekly(-ish) snow report by email. It's rather good and not made up by tourist offices (or people that love the tourist office and want to marry it either)... We don't share your email address with anyone and we never send out any of those cheesy 'message from our partners' emails either. Anyway, snowHeads really is MUCH better when you're logged in - not least because you get to post your own messages complaining about things that annoy you like perhaps this banner which, incidentally, disappears when you log in :-)
Username:-
 Password:
Remember me:
durr, I forgot...
Or: Register
(to be a proper snow-head, all official-like!)

Snowboarders Facing $168,000 Fines For Triggering Avalanche

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
okay okay I know they are snowboarders so we're gonna give them the stick - but makes you think a bit about where you ski/board

https://denver.cbslocal.com/2020/10/14/snowboarders-face-jail-time-fine-avalanche-near-eisenhower-tunnel/
snow report
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@extremerob, a rather expensive day out in the backcountry!
ski holidays
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
My initial reaction was to feel bad for them. I then thought about it a bit more, remembered that the article said snowboarders, and decided that they really should have considered what would happen if it all went tits up.
snow report
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
The fact that they were experienced may well count against them, ie arguably they should have foreseen where the avalanche would go, if they did set it off.
snow conditions
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Smoke screen springs to my mind! The chute was primed and "should" have been detonated long before the guys got near the area.
Sniffs of the authorities feeling embarrassed by the failure of the highway protection system!
snow report
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Prefering 2 planks, I'm not that up to date with snowboarding techniques, but is it standard practice to "ski cut just above the cornice to test the slope for reactivity."?

Also, "Neither party believed any vehicle or people were below them when the avalanche was triggered."

Bulls**t!! How could they possible tell from that angle and distance?

To me, just a couple of idiots out to have fun and not giving a toss about the safety of others.

If they were complete beginers, some allowance could be made for inexperience, but the fact that they claim to be "experienced backcountry riders" makes this worse in my view.

The more experience you claim to be, the more a charge of negligence could apply if it all goes t*ts up.


Just for the record, I'm not biased, I would make the same comments if they had been skiers. Toofy Grin Toofy Grin
latest report
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Rogerdodger wrote:
Smoke screen springs to my mind! The chute was primed and "should" have been detonated long before the guys got near the area.
Sniffs of the authorities feeling embarrassed by the failure of the highway protection system!


My first reaction - if it was a chute under state"control" then manifestly thos controls had failed and perhaps the boarders did everyone a favour by "safely" triggering a smaller avalanche than mght have occurred later. Clearly they thought they were doing a precautionary "failsafe" cut to ensure the controls had operated effectively, not recklessly jumping in careless as to effect. Think they probably have a decent case if they have decent enough lawyers versed in backcountry risk factors. Obviously it would be important if the state or highways authority had posted prohibition notices on the area but it sounds like they hadn't.
latest report
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
From pugski

Apparently CDOT don't control for any human triggers nor post closure on terrain (or have Forest Service do so).

I'm a bit sceptical that natural triggers aren't really a matter of time before they go big enough at the right/wrong time to defeat a control programme but maybe there's a point that a chute which has to have a manual cut on it to "go" wouldn't have gone naturally. Think they were probably idiots for going into a zone where worst run out would be into a very high profile bit of infrstructure.
latest report
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
brianatab wrote:
Prefering 2 planks, I'm not that up to date with snowboarding techniques, but is it standard practice to "ski cut just above the cornice to test the slope for reactivity."? ...
Rather like the mountain not knowing you're an expert, it obviously doesn't know what you have strapped to your feet either.

It depends what they mean, precisely, but broadly yes, "ski cuts", even on a snowboard, are
absolutely standard practice. In this case the technique appears to have saved both their lives.

All other things being equal, that suggests that they were competent. You can never tell from one journalist's article,
but it sounds like the issue is more if it was legal to ride there or not. If it's legal to ride, then one must accept that there's
a slide risk, end of story. If on the other hand the proximity of the highway means that they don't want the risk of skier (or boarder)
triggered slides, then riding there will be illegal, and they should not have been there, competent to deal with the conditions or otherwise.
latest report
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
It's an interesting situation and I have mixed feelings.

They should have been aware that a potential slide could affect those below. It's no different to dropping in on top of someone in that regard. The fact they said they believed no vehicle was below them suggests they did know their was potential for a slide to go onto the road (although I'm skeptical they could know that).

On the other hand it seems unlikely that a slide that big could have been predicted. It would be interesting to see the full report for that day as simply stating the risk was level 2 does not say much. For example in Canada the avalanche forecast gives a risk of avalanche and also expected size. If the forecast was saying risk level 2 but expected size 4-5 and the snowpack was known to have a deep weak layer I'd maybe be more critical.

While I question if it would have slid naturally, I think the state/transport board have to accept some fault. Either they need to control it better to prevent a situation where it can slide into the road, or completely close the area off for skiers.

(For those that want to see a harmonious - for the most part - relationship of backcountry skiing and avy controlling a major highway look at Rogers pass in Canada.)

Fortunately no one was hurt. The idea of prison and huge fines seems overkill. A slap on the wrist and a new policy to prevent the situation happening again seems like a sensible outcome.
ski holidays
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
boarder2020 wrote:
It's an interesting situation and I have mixed feelings.

They should have been aware that a potential slide could affect those below. It's no different to dropping in on top of someone in that regard. The fact they said they believed no vehicle was below them suggests they did know their was potential for a slide to go onto the road (although I'm skeptical they could know that).


"They said they believed no vehicle was below them" prompts a couple of points. From their viewpoint could they actually see all the area of the road which the avalanche eventually reached? Secondly, even if the road was clear when they triggered the avalanche as it's a high speed Interstate it only takes a couple of seconds for a vehicle they couldn't see to enter the danger zone.
latest report
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
boarder2020 wrote:
A slap on the wrist and a new policy to prevent the situation happening again seems like a sensible outcome.


Agreed. But this is America.
snow report
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
@Alastair Pink, agreed.

There is also the factor that it would be impossible to see any pedestrian traffic from that distance, or to predict any traffic exiting the tunnel.
snow report
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
This is the CAIC report before anyone gets into any fantasies about it taking out I 70 traffic which is constant. It went to a service road above the tunnel entrance and the damage the state are claiming is predominantly to avy protection structures.

https://avalanche.state.co.us/caic/acc/acc_report.php?acc_id=754&accfm=inv

Seems that locally the pair have been known for close calls in the past however.
ski holidays
 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
That's a handy report. From that they were actually descending: it wasn't a ski cut which released it. If you look at the images, the "step down" is quite dramatic.

I don't know what laws are in play, but the canon placement assumes that the upper slope doesn't slide... which is clearly incorrect.
The upper slope isn't protected at all (image 3).
I guess the boarders will then claim any damage to the cannon is a feature of lack of protection to the upper slopes..
latest report
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
That second step-down in the slide is pretty impressive!

It also looks like where the second major step-down takes place that there is an avi-control cannon slightly above (blue oval between B and C), which you would think would have been effective in preventing an unstable pack forming there.

Quote:

mitigation to protect infrastructure like highways is focused on reducing the potential of large natural avalanches. This differs from mitigation within ski areas, where the focus is reducing the potential for even small human-triggered avalanches.


The first and small slide is skier triggered, the second harder to see how you would classify it as small.

latest report



Terms and conditions  Privacy Policy