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Wrist supports following break

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Not sure if this is the right place to post this or not as it’s part equipment part technique.

We went skiing to the Tamworth snow dome at weekend with a friend who was having his first snowboard lesson.
An hour or so in he managed to fall badly resulting in us taking him to casualty Crying or Very sad
(3 and a bit hours later we got home at around 2.30 am…If you can avoid a casualty department late on a Friday night, the staff are great but the patients aren’t always sober!! ) He now has his arm in plaster with a broken wrist. (Ouch)

Anyhow this hasn’t put him off and he still wants to learn (after the cast comes off) but is now asking about wrist braces or supports.
Has anyone got any experience of what’s good or not ?
Got / bad manufactures ?
Prices ?

Cheers
Rob
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Here's a link to www.ski-injury.com. An excellent site written by a ski patrol doctor based in Aviemore. Scroll down to find recommendations and prices. Seems wrist guards are very effective protection against breaks. I'm sure some snowHeads Darksiders will also chip in ideas.

The rest of the site is a gold mine of info about snowsports injuries, prevention, and treatment. It's own search facility didn't seem to work but the site is so good you'll probably not need it. (Google strikes again.)
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
rob and sharon, i broke my wrist at Christmas, and skiied the rest of the season wearing one of teh snowboarder wrist gurads, and they worked perfectly. Unfortunatly that same wrist has broken multiple times in the last few years and i will always wear this support to ski now. Just make sure your gloves will fit over it, and, if skiing, you can still grip your poles. Hope that helps.
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Wrist Guards are a definite must. My first weekend learning, my wrists were in bits. On my second full holiday I bought a pair of Level gloves which incorporate the wrist guards, http://www.levelgloves.com/ Thewrist gurads are removeable if required. My last two holidays with these gloves I have had absolutely no problems with my wrists. They also give you a bit more confidence when going to catch yourself.

I think as with any protection spending a bit more money will always give you a bit more protection. I can't remember exactly how much mine were but the gloves were in the region of about £80. Can't say that they would always save you, but they will protect you more than if you didn't.

I can't recommend them enuff...
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Used wrist supports when learning and only do now when it's icey. as Oisin Osh Kelly, says get the gloves with the wrist gaurds incorporated. If you buy seperate wrist gaurds you find that it is an absolute pain to get your gloves over them, you may end up also buying a new pair of gloves. You'll also probably find that the gloves themselves will get worn out very quickly where the gloves are streched over the wrist gaurds - at least what i've found with several friends who used seperate gloves - but this was using skateboarding/inline skating wrist gaurds, specifically snowboard/sk=ng may be better. Also with getting them incorporated in the glove - you have to wear them & can't forget them!

I think Dakine (http://www.dakine.com) do a pair of seperate wrist gaurds for about £14. They seem to be the most popular makers of protective wear.
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Around here, Seirus is the budget provider of gauntlet -style gloves with wrist guards. I find the warmth and comfort adequate, if quite difficult to dry out at the end of the day. Dan, these things are fairly snowboard or miniski-specific; it is very difficult to hold your poles with a full wrist guard!

It is probably very risky logic to extrapolate injury statistics to snowsports from inline skating. I will, however, say that a wrist-protected skater is still at some risk for a rotator cuff injury.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
comprex, there's a excellent French-made one I bought over the counter at a pharmacy in Les Arcs for a friend, then used it myself when I sprained my wrist later. No problem at all with poles, ample support provided. 'Sober' or some such name. Cost a bit though, around 50 euros.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
The Dakine set are pretty good. Make sure you don't get stung though. As Dan says above, they should be about £14-£15. I'm sure though I saw them for £40 in Slush and Rubble after I'd bought a pair for around £15.

I didn't have a problem fitting them under my gloves (don't wear them now as I don't fall with my hands outstretched). Remove the liners and they'll fit well.
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Does your buddy want to wear wrist supports as protection, while boarding before the fracture has completely recovered, or does he plan to wear it ever after, as a precaution?

I broke my wrist many years ago, playing hockey, and in my view the the best form of post-injury protection you can get is proper rehab.

If you rely on wrist supports you can kid yourself that your wrist is protected, without having to put the effort in that's involved in rehabilitation. Once the plaster comes off, start right in on the appropriate exercise regime. Don't stop until the wrist is stronger than it was before. You shouldn't need any artificial aids after that.
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Lager wrote:
The Dakine set are pretty good.


I agree - dakine wrist-guards are good. And by having wrist guards rather than specially adapted gloves means you don't have to buy expensive gloves with guards every time you want a new pair of gloves.

My dakine wrist-guards cost £12 a couple of years ago. I got them from a snow shop in the snowzone at Milton Keynes. I know you can buy them at the likes of Ellis Brigham and Snow and Rock too. snowHead
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
Thanks fort he Comments Snowy and Acacia
He's out of the cast now and I think he wants them as a bit of support, more just incase I think.Rob
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