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New ski suggestions?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
I'm sure this topic used to be popular, but I think almost everybody upgraded their straight skis to shaped skis. My straight skis are 190cm, I'm 5'10", 185 lbs. When I got my straight skis I was way lighter (maybe 140 lbs) and quite a bit shorter (5'6" or so). I would say I am an advanced skier. I love skiing the bumps and nice groomed trails.

So I'm looking for a new skis. I want a shape ski that won't force me to change my skiing too much, and I would like a ski that can do the bumps and the groomed stuff, but a bit better in the bumps. I haven't started a ski equipment budget yet, but I'd appreciate suggestions of cheap and expensive skis.

Thanks.

-Christian
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Hi Chris, welcome to snowHeads! snowHead
When you said: "I want a shape ski that won't force me to change my skiing too much", I was a bit concerned. The newer skies have different characteristics to the older ones. While they can be skiied the same way, the benefit really comes from changing your technique. You may find that even a good half day lesson will make a big difference.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
For my 2 pennies worth here, I moved from over 2 metre skis to anything from 155 to 184 depending on the conditions & how I want ski. The only skis that really forced me to change how I skied were Dynastar Ski Cross. There is no way that you could ski them, other than with a wide (shoulder-width) stance. I was, however, taught to carve turns and it's a lot easier with parabolic skis than it ever was with straight skis, it's also a lot easier to ski off-piste with parabolic skis.
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sirchris, another welcome to snowHead snowHeads snowHead
I'm very much an intermediate. Skied for 8 years quite happily on 190 Kastle long and thins. Couldn't be bothered to hump them one year and rented Volki Carver Motions about 160. Couldn't believe the difference. I can't help with more specific advice but I think you are going to enjoy the testing and riding when you do decide what to go for. Try the site's search facility on something like 'buying and new and skis' to dredge up previous comment and advice on this topic.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
I guess I also am not sure what I would need to change in my skiing style to be happy with the new skis. I don't mind a half day lesson, or even a full day lesson to learn new techniques. I just don't want it to feel like I would have to learn how to ski all over again. I remember horror stories from the first shaped skis.

I guess size is another good question. I know the parabolic skis are shorter, but any recomendation for the size I should start looking at? Thanks again.

-Christian
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Hi sirchris, my opinion would be, that as you have not skiied any, to go to resort, take a lesson or two and demo some new ones. Once i was finally convinced to change, there was no going back. and they have come a long way since the first evolution.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
depends on the ski, but generally for an all-round ski (if such as thing exists anymore!) for you (given your old stats were 190cm, I'm 5'10", 185 lbs), you might want to try something around 170cm to start with, maybe 175ish.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
welcome to snowHeads Christian!

The fact that u say u like to ski 'bumps and groomers' makes it difficult for me to find a single ski to recommend.

On the one hand, in bumps I like a slight shorter, softer ski with a fairly tight side cut. I rather like the bumps myself and Ski Salomon Pocket Rocket 175's which I find are ideal for this. They're twin tips (so if u like to ski thebumps backwards, they're suitable for that too Laughing ).

However, apart from the 'groomer' aspect u also say u want the transition from straights to be not too drastic. So, perhaps something a little longer, stiffer, straighter would suit u better. In the Salomon range, that would mean a model like the 'Scream Hot'.
Length wise, u should be looking at losing at least 10cm from what u are currently using. So 180 Screams would prolly be good.

Something to look out for, which was not an issue with straight skis, is the sidecut (depth of contour) of the skis. Sometimes this will be published as a Radius of the circle the skis will describe in a standard carved turn; more often in the form of 3 figures eg. 109 - 95 - 104 these being the width of the ski at its front, waist and tail respectively. Obviously the greater the difference between the end figures and the middle one, the tighter the sidecut. A greater sidecut makes a ski less stable on the flat or at speed but more responsive to turn.
The numbers for twin twips tend to be more simetrical with ther often being very little difference between the front and the tail figure. Accordingly these often ski well with the skier's weight more central. Skis like the Scream will have a much bigger difference between the tip and waist than the tail and waist. Hence one stears them a little more with the fronts. This, of course, is much more typical and again, one step closer to what you're used to.
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Awesome! Thanks for the help. I have enough information now that it makes researching skis so much easier. I search around the web a little bit for the 'Scream Hot' and they sound like they would fit what I am looking for nicely. Are there other skis comparable to them? What about the "Scream X" how do they differ?
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