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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
beny992 wrote:
@AL9000, I’ve tried that, I feel more in control, I just have to stick with that every time because sometimes I feel that my weight isn’t forward and my quads are sore, especially when high speed/steep slopes, how can I improve that when I’m in a high speed/steeper slopes?

Sounds to me you’re subconsciously leaning back when the slope get steeper.

If so, you’re “over terrained”. Do your drills in easier terrain. Then, pick a short section of steep that has a clear easy runout, let you speed build! You won’t die. Smile But concentrate at keeping the same forward posture.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Old Fartbag wrote:
..those turns did look better, as you were allowing the skis time to turn - which is more effortless, due to letting the skis do their thing, without forcing them sideways.


+1
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
beny992 wrote:
@Old Fartbag,
Thanks for the help. I have an frame. Just uploaded a video so you could see that, and I think that’s why my knee is so hurt.


http://youtube.com/v/NPZucHoOnj4

@AL9000, I’ve tried that, I feel more in control, I just have to stick with that every time because sometimes I feel that my weight isn’t forward and my quads are sore, especially when high speed/steep slopes, how can I improve that when I’m in a high speed/steeper slopes?

BTW, today was my last day of skiing, only in March I’ll be skiing again and I’ll have a new instructor. Still doesn’t know where, but I’ll ask for a recommendation on a good instructor.
Thanks!



Looking much better Beny992, but freeze it at 0.07- 0.08 - what do you see? You're still backseat.
Just say, "knees ahead of toes" or "thigh high" or "heels back" at every turn as a mental trigger to help you get forward.
It's the toughest thing for intermediates to get right, but keep at it coz it's a game-changer!

Can you get lessons at an indoor snow dome near you? Work on this all February indoors, then you'll be skiing really well in March.
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AL9000 wrote:


Looking much better Beny992, but freeze it at 0.07- 0.08 - what do you see? You're still backseat.
Just say, "knees ahead of toes" or "thigh high" or "heels back" at every turn as a mental trigger to help you get forward.
It's the toughest thing for intermediates to get right, but keep at it coz it's a game-changer!

Can you get lessons at an indoor snow dome near you? Work on this all February indoors, then you'll be skiing really well in March.

That backseat position will become more and more of a problem, the steeper and icier it gets.....and will end up with leg burn and potentially extra strain on the knees.

Of your suggestions, I find pulling the heels back works best.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@Old Fartbag, Me too. "Heels back" totally fixed my posture. I still have an issue at speed, but I've been working on fore-aft drills during turns which has helped.
The G-forces at speed/steeps will cane his quads if he doesn't fix that backseat.
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Carve.

Stop skidding.

Tip up your edges more.

Lean forward more.

It takes 10-20 weeks to get good.

Do a 2-week vacation.

Ski every day, all day, for 14-16 days.

The "time on snow" is what counts.

Most casual skiers (90%) stay cr*p because of a lack of *continuous* snowtime.

The more you ski, the better you get.

Looking at the 3 videoclips, you are 5-10 weeks away from being a good skier.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Whitegold wrote:


It takes 10-20 weeks to get good.
...
Looking at the 3 videoclips, you are 5-10 weeks away from being a good skier.


Bollox!
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
AL9000 wrote:
Whitegold wrote:


It takes 10-20 weeks to get good.
...
Looking at the 3 videoclips, you are 5-10 weeks away from being a good skier.


Bollox!

It probably does if you have lots of millage and few lessons - as all that does, is further ingrain bad habits. Quality Instruction + effective practice gets you there quicker.
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@beny992, I think you did that 'superman' drill really well.
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Ski the Net with snowHeads
red 27 wrote:
@beny992, I think you did that 'superman' drill really well.

......then my apologies to the OP for doubting him.
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snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
Old Fartbag wrote:

5. One knee collapsing inside sounds like an A Frame problem (if it happens on both sides). This could be down to the "way you are built" and needs corrected with alignment. Mrs. F had this problem for 25 years until an Instructor sent her to have her alignment checked. After correction, she can now change both edges at the same time and by the same amount.


What is this alignment-correction procedure of which you speak?
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Pyremaniac wrote:
Old Fartbag wrote:

5. One knee collapsing inside sounds like an A Frame problem (if it happens on both sides). This could be down to the "way you are built" and needs corrected with alignment. Mrs. F had this problem for 25 years until an Instructor sent her to have her alignment checked. After correction, she can now change both edges at the same time and by the same amount.


What is this alignment (and correction) concept of which you speak?

If you don't stand with the skis flat on the snow - ie. On your inside edges (knees coming together, like in the case of Mrs F); or on your outside edges (bow legged), then your edges will be at different angles when trying to turn.

When my Wife went to turn, she simply could not get the inside ski angle to match the turning one, so either lifted it up, or skied with a pronounced A-Frame. Once this was corrected, both skis came around so fast (as both were at the same angle and at the same time), she spent a morning being left behind. Once she got used to the different sensation, she hasn't looked back.

Here is S4F discussing what can be done: https://www.solutions4feet.com/skier-balance---alignment
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
Thanks - I have clown feet whose happy position is 70 degrees (yep) apart... As you can imagine it plays merry hell with my skiing (and to some extent, snowboarding) because to get my feet parallel with knees bent I end up almost touching my knees together. Always happy to find out more about what could potentially be done!
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
@Pyremaniac, I just checked and my natural feet position standing upright is only slightly narrower than yours. I need to turn my knees in slightly for my feet to point forwards. I think we're built that way, so you're not that abnormal.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
@Pyremaniac, @AL9000, I believe having your feet diverge in a V is quite normal. The problem comes if you have a pronounced problem (ie. more than be corrected naturally with your range of motion), with knock knees or bow legs. Women often have a greater Q Angle, leading to the knees coming together: http://www.psia-rm.org/download/resources/alpine-documents/alpine-course-outlines/Womens-Program-Handout-2018-edit.pdf

Have a look at where the heel of your shoes wears down the most.
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
@Old Fartbag, Never thought much about heels til now. I suppose that's why, with some shoes, there's a different material for the outside-rear section of heel. And some soft spikes degrade faster than others on the same shoe.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Old Fartbag wrote:

Have a look at where the heel of your shoes wears down the most.

Quite. I have to change my shoes with absurd regularity because of the weardown on the "corner". It feels very unnatural to make my feet more parallel than 70 degrees; wheareas 90 degrees is perfectly comfortable. (Just to put my situation in context.)
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@Pyremaniac, I take back my words wink
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Pyremaniac wrote:
Old Fartbag wrote:

Have a look at where the heel of your shoes wears down the most.

Quite. I have to change my shoes with absurd regularity because of the weardown on the "corner". It feels very unnatural to make my feet more parallel than 70 degrees; wheareas 90 degrees is perfectly comfortable. (Just to put my situation in context.)

I think "normal", is diverging outwards by up to 15 deg from the midline of the body.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@Old Fartbag, @AL9000, "Heels to the back" sounds good! I'll try that next time i'll skiing, I really want to get out the backseat, I know that it will be a big improvement for myself. My quads are killing me when I ski some steep slopes/high speed and I'm sure I will be more in control.

@AL9000, I don't have an indoor snow dome where I live, only dry slopes. I did 5 lessons on dry slopes before this ski vacation and it felt really weird. Do you think I should do more lessons on dry slopes during February? The thing is that you can't be on the edges so much, and the technique there is quite different from the real life because there is relatively high friction there. The instructor told me there that the turn should be like that: 1. stand up 2. pressure on down hill ski 3. with the heel of the uphill ski rotate the ski so it will be parallel to the downhill ski 4. finish the turn. No edges at all. He told me that you can't be on the edges on the dry slope because how it's built.

Thank you so much for the help!
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@beny992, Good skiers can ski anything anyhow anytime.

Do the dry slope and do drills til you're out the backseat. And build up leg muscles. You'll be flying by March snowHead
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
beny992 wrote:
@Old Fartbag, @AL9000, "Heels to the back" sounds good! I'll try that next time i'll skiing, I really want to get out the backseat, I know that it will be a big improvement for myself. My quads are killing me when I ski some steep slopes/high speed and I'm sure I will be more in control.

@AL9000, I don't have an indoor snow dome where I live, only dry slopes. I did 5 lessons on dry slopes before this ski vacation and it felt really weird. Do you think I should do more lessons on dry slopes during February? The thing is that you can't be on the edges so much, and the technique there is quite different from the real life because there is relatively high friction there. The instructor told me there that the turn should be like that: 1. stand up 2. pressure on down hill ski 3. with the heel of the uphill ski rotate the ski so it will be parallel to the downhill ski 4. finish the turn. No edges at all. He told me that you can't be on the edges on the dry slope because how it's built.

Thank you so much for the help!

I have only been on a Dry Slope a couple of times, maybe 30 years ago and have never had a lesson on one......but there is a healthy Racing scene on these slopes, which I doubt would happen if you couldn't ride the edges. It's possible the instruction you are being given is to make it easier for you.

My very personal opinion, is that you should put the money towards lessons on Snow, if you can't get to a Snow Dome.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@AL9000, Yeah, I think I'll do some lessons on the dry slope. Which drills for backseat to do beside always thinking of heel to the back? And do you have some exercise/routine for building up leg muscles? I do Leg blasters, I work on my ankle flex, I have really tight calves so I can't flex my ankle enough.

@Old Fartbag, Yeah I'll do lessons on the snow as I do every time. I will to the dry slopes and will work on my backseat problem.
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@beny992, 'Heels back' for everything.
For speed, I do a double pole plant to get me forward in the second half of turn.
For steeps, I think 'thigh high'. You have to get perpendicular to the slope (as far as possible).

Running, squats, lunges. Then after I've warmed up, I stretch out lower leg both front/shin and back/calf, then upper leg quads/hamstrings. I don't do this often enough.

More time on slope doing drills correctly, the better.
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Calf Stretches: https://www.diyjointpainrelief.com/best-calf-stretches.html

Tutorial (Warren Smith): http://www.warrensmith-skiacademy.com/tutorial/ski-biomechanics-range-tests/

Lots of (Painful) work, with a decent foam Roller, like that from Trigger Point (Stretching alone will help, but won't solve the problem):


http://youtube.com/v/aAnF6q88mU4
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