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Maintenance

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Just some advice, really. Now we have a pair of skis in the family (well blades really - the wife's), what sort of equipment should I be looking to buy to provide required maintenance?

I appreciate that a quick trip into S&R or the local hire shop on resort would be an easy enough route, but I'd quite like to do the job myself. Good practice for the main event, when I finally take the plunge and buy some planks for myself.

Thanks.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Mark go to www.tokowax.com, you'll find details there but my list of tools would be:
Base file
Edge file
Diamond stone
Metal / plastic scraper
Cork pad for buffing
copper wire brush/ nylon brush
electric iron
dewaxer
wax

Next time you're in La Ros I'll show you how to service skis, it doesn't take long and not only saves you mney but you know it's been done correctly.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
David@traxvax, think you need to edit your url...
www.tokowax.com
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
David@traxvax, cheers David. But surely, that's Masque's job isn't it Wink
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Google spat this out. Seems very useful to me.
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
masopa took this up recently - he seemed very pleased - not sure if there is a thread around describing his experiences...
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
For cleaning skis I prefer not to use a dewaxer - solvents can dry out the base. All you need is a soft 'yellow' paraffin-type wax - wax adheres to itself so when you remove it while still liquid after applying with an iron this has the same effect as a dewaxer, removing all the old wax and impurities. Wipe off with a paper towel, then scrape brush off the remainder (as quickly as possible before it solidifies) then apply the wax 'proper' you are using for the conditions. This isn't something you have to do each time you wax the skis though, unless you're racing...

Tip for the attempt at the flèche d'argent Wink.. Even if you prepare your skis 'perfectly' in the warm, outside in the cold the base will contract a little and squeeze wax back onto the surface, and will need a quick rescrape/brush before the race. Getting the right wax for the conditions makes a big difference as well of course.... we've got a dozen or so varieties we use individually or in combination!

The edges are at 90° when new, but these can catch at every little bump in the snow. So for tuning edges this depends on your level - adding 1° or 2° means they won't bite until pressure is applied. At World Cup level some racers go as far as 80° I've heard! 88° or thereabouts is pretty usual. So get the file guide at the angle for your ability.

Don't forget a paintbrush! This is to brush off all the little filings from the base before waxing, otherwise they embed themselves in the base.

You can get special brake-restraining devices or use simple strong elastic restrainers to hold the brake down so you can wax/tune the edges in one movement.

The diamond stone is important because if you don't remove any burs first it's hard to work the file properly to sharpen the edge.

A wire brush is needed to clean your files. Skiers usually have at least a couple of different file grades (coarse/fine), to use according to the state of the edges...

There's a load more stuff I could add, but that's some of the basics off the top of my head..

(Oh, and buy your 'all-purpose' wax bulk, it works out considerably cheaper).
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Another great source of info is http://www.tognar.com/ specifically,

http://www.tognar.com/volkl.html and

http://www.tognar.com/start_tuning_waxing_skis_snowboards.html .


Tom / PM
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
What can I say? Many thanks guys Smile Thought Kurt's pictorial link to the Tetron site was very useful for one so "blind" to the art of ski maintenance - nice one!
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Snowblade-specific issues that weren't addressed above:

- There is a rather significant degree of edge 'burn' sometimes perceptible as a ~1.5 cm strip of discoloration next to the edge. A reasonable guideline is to use wax about 1 or 2 grades colder than recommended for your conditions. (e.g. Swix blue/green for red conditions). Dendex skiers see this, too.

- Related to the above, they're actually quite often not remotely base-flat from the shop. Of our four pairs from reputed French manufacturers, it was the one pair from Line/Karhu (from Cowansville, PQ) that wasn't base-high. If you have a metal rule or some other nice straight edge, do check.
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
comprex, thanks - will do. Oh, and welcome to snowHeads Smile
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Mark, Snow and Rock do demonstration evenings (call in November for dates, according to the Chertsey store). Good if you actually want to see some one damaging then repairing skis.
Did it ages ago, and now will probably go back for a refresher, as I intend to start doing my own skis again.
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
Mark, I would highly recommend doing your skis yourself. It doesn't take that long and is actually quite fun. I did it for the first time before my Courchevel trip this year. Sorted out the edges and gave the base a nice new wax coat. Didn't even make too much of a mess, either.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
Excellent advice here on how to service our skis, but also important is how to store our kit in summer and autumn. I used to store skis and boots in the loft, jacket and trousers in bedroom wardrobe (useful to grab on way to Narnia).
However a recent SCGB publication advised not to leave boots in the loft: lofts can get very warm on hot sunny days and this heat is not good for ski boots.
My boots are now in the cupboard-under-the-stairs. My old skis are still in the loft.
So, questions:
1. tips please on where to store ski equipment: loft? cupboard? garage?
2. what position for skis: standing up? lying down? on their side? on their bases?
3. maintenance tips for jacket and trousers? Mark Hunter posted this site on SCGB Chat.

Finally, is it possible to de-pong boot liners. At the end of a day's skiing my socks are lethal weapons. Is it possible to wash the liners? Would a gentle washing machine cycle ruin them?
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
On the liners, I reckon detergents & soap powder might not be too kind to them. Hot washes would obviously be out for any hotform liners! Bashing around in a machine might not be great either. Perhaps a soak in a nice warm (40 degrees) bath, followed by drying naturally and a squirt of Fabreze?

I heard skis lying down on a rack is best (not clipped together, either). Couldn't really imagine lying on their bases or edges would make much difference really!

Would also hazard a guess that, like wine, humidity, temperature variation and extremes are not kind to skis. Downside of garages is that it gets cold at night/warm in the day, but on the upside, humidity is generally pretty low. Humidity can be higher in a loft, so maybe in a cupboard inside - not the kitchen?
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