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Ramp Angles / Binding Delta etc

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
@Dabber, it's the other way around in that most people are fine with the higher deltas but for those that suffer it's a major issue. But changing the delta won't compromise safety/performance apart from reducing the relative height of the climbing bars.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
My understanding of why alpine bindings have high delta angles is that they were designed back in the time of straight skis that were hard to turn. High delta allowed (and still promotes) those at lower skill levels to stem (heel push) the skis to get them to turn easier. Pure alpine binding designs have changed very little over the years as the costs of certification are high and shimming is always possible for those people who understand the benefits and is a big reason race skis come flat.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@Dabber, Sometimes it depends on the circumstances too. E.g. a frame binding like the Marker Tour has a high delta when you adjust it to fit a touring boot like the Zero-G. Change it to fit an alpine boot and it is back to zero delta.
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
skimottaret wrote:
My understanding of why alpine bindings have high delta angles is that they were designed back in the time of straight skis that were hard to turn. High delta allowed (and still promotes) those at lower skill levels to stem (heel push) the skis to get them to turn easier. Pure alpine binding designs have changed very little over the years as the costs of certification are high and shimming is always possible for those people who understand the benefits and is a big reason race skis come flat.


don't a lot of race skis pair with dedicated race plates and binding combos or is that old had now?
The secondhand FIS SLs I picked up (Salomon) seem to work as a package but may be I'm wrong
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@jedster, sorry I should have said they don't have integrated rail bindings and the bindings/plates can be disassembled and shimmed typically...
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