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Skis- How wide is too wide.

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
https://realskiers.com/revelations/why-wide-skis-arent-good-for-your-knees/

This rings true for me. I’ve skied a few wider skis and my sweet spot is around 98. I absolutely loved my 115 skis but they made my knees hurt!
snow conditions     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
I'm not keen on anything above 75mm. I like something in the de-tuned GS category and can happily ski most conditions on them. Head Supershape i.Speed, Rossignol Hero Long Turns, Atomic x9's etc. I used some wide powder skis in Chamonix a few years ago and liked them in the deep stuff - but that was because my Kniessl White Stars (ca. 1999) didn't work at all! I had Rossi Long Turns in Austria for Snowmageddon last season and they worked fine off piste. Each to their own.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
I once skied 112mm underfoot all week, mainly off piste, no problem with the knees.

I finished with half a day on piste and 77mm underfoot and all that carving hurt my knees.

Depends what snow you're skiing on.
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Been saying this for years ...
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Just read the article. While I agree with the conclusion, the argument is rubbish.


Last edited by Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do. on Wed 11-09-19 8:22; edited 1 time in total
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I thought this sounded very familiar, there was a long thread on the same “Research” in 2015, this looks like a rehash of the same.

This article is the same as that one, ie. stating the bleeding obvious, in that if you try and ski a 120mm ski in the same way as an 80mm, the leverage with be higher, it’s basic physics.

https://snowheads.com/ski-forum/viewtopic.php?p=2679447&highlight=research#2679447
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
And while it’s logical that skiing a wide ski on a hard piste requires more effort and strain on the knees to carve, skiing a narrow ski in heavy or wind blown snow is more likely to leave you with a knee injury. Right ski for the. conditions and good technique is the obvious answer
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
BobinCH wrote:
Right ski for the. conditions
Absolutely correct.
BobinCH wrote:
...and good technique is the obvious answer
That too.

Choose a ski which best matches the conditions you actually ski, rather than the conditions you would like to ski.
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Knee pain using wide skis (when narrow skis are pain free) is often a sign of an alignment issue. The alignment issue is magnified as the ski width increases. I have a number of customers whose knee pain was sorted after they were assessed for and had lateral canting work done.
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Ski the Net with snowHeads
@spyderjon, that makes sense.
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@spyderjon, that is interesting indeed. I've been nervous of wide skis ever since I tested some Whitedots at MK, and couldn't get out of the car when I got home, because my knees had stiffened up so badly.

Not an issue for me now, though, as I don't go off-piste any more. But I must be one of many intermediate skiers who don't want to lug a quiver of skis around, so the all-mountain skis you recommended are - of course! - perfect, manoeuvrable on a hard piste and great in slush.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
spyderjon wrote:
Knee pain using wide skis (when narrow skis are pain free) is often a sign of an alignment issue. The alignment issue is magnified as the ski width increases. I have a number of customers whose knee pain was sorted after they were assessed for and had lateral canting work done.


Was the canting generally inside or outside of the boot?

https://www.solutions4feet.com/skier-balance---alignment
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
under a new name wrote:
Just read the article. While I agree with the conclusion, the argument is rubbish.


because...?



I guess the advice is not really for the wise and experienced skiers above but for people like me with dodgy knees (I sometimes have to wear a knee brace when cycling). I could very easily read a review for a so called all-mountain ski like the following in the Telegraph...

Quote:
Dominating the advanced category for long turns, high speed, liveliness and groomed piste, the Rustler 10s love to charge as hard as a herd of stampeding cattle. Their dynamic flex is ideal for laying down high-speed trenches on piste, and they also blast happily through powder or crud, and are well suited to stronger skiers.

+ Long turns, high speed, low speed, smoothness, liveliness/responsiveness, groomed piste
- None


...and think, "Well that sounds pretty nigh on ideal for zooming around the piste for my couple of weeks a year, while having the opportunity to learn how to be one of the cool kids when deep powder offers itself."

The article is telling me that at 102 wide, I should probably ignore this ski's on-piste attributes because skiing to its max potential increases the risk of damage to my knees, if only slightly.

He seems to be implying there's no difference between 66mm and 99mm (assuming a tibia head width of 100mm) and then I'd guess that the lateral forces increase exponentially as width increases?
snow conditions     
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
I wonder if exercises for knock kneed people would help


http://youtube.com/v/Mp6XPzqz6xQ


http://youtube.com/v/6XTsnSp5nYU
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
spyderjon wrote:
Knee pain using wide skis (when narrow skis are pain free) is often a sign of an alignment issue. The alignment issue is magnified as the ski width increases. I have a number of customers whose knee pain was sorted after they were assessed for and had lateral canting work done.

Physics dictate wider skis require wider range of motion in the lower body.

Improper alignment effectively reduce the knee's range of motion. So something has to give. Knee pain is the common complain. Fix the alignment, the knees will be happier in general.

But the few week a year skiers, muscle strength and flexibility are probably not at their optimal either. The extra stress of wider skis will do "something" to the body. Typically knees are the first to take the blunt of it.

I've been going from narrow to wide and now back down to something in the 80-85mm range, even for off-piste. I'm only 5'4 and 110lb. Unlike the 6' tall former ruby player with wide shoulder, I don't need a big platform to float or balance on.
snow conditions     
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
My 'go to' skis are a pair of 67mm SLs and a pair of 120mm Bents. Although I can feel an increase in the force transmitted using the wider skis on piste my knees feel the same for both pairs. Now running... that is a different story.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@Scarpa, I can't imagine running is very comfortable with either pair of skis? Puzzled Laughing
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
I don't know if its just me .. but I find Jackson Hogan's prose is just so difficult to read.
I just get bored by the end of the sentence, I can't imagine having a pint with him.

I'm a piste person so anything wider than 80mm is a bit of a waste of time.

I remember many years ago 1994 renting Volkl Explosive, they were interesting as that particular week we had pile of powda in Verbier,
I dont know how wide they were, but we called them Fat Boys .... they were probably 110mm wide but not parabolic, so pretty hard work.
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@DrLawn, explosivs were 95mm under foot believe it or not
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