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Blood pressure vs body temperature

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
I did a search on the internet a few years ago for data on how blood pressure varies by temperature. I found one or two studies which suggested that some people are more sensitive than others. Overall though, it suggested a relationship of systolic blood pressure would decrease by 0.3mmHg times the increase in room temperature indoors in centigrade.

This was not really helpful to me, and it also suggested diastolic was less related to room temperature. In my understanding of how blood vessels close up, I would have thought it would have had a similar effect. However, perhaps their studies were on a bigger sample and normalised for other factors which I have not removed. (my graph is a one way analysis, theirs may have stripped out interaction effects)



Anyway, over that time I decided to measure my blood pressure in different room temperatures with my body temperature and some other data. I am still gathering data particularly at the extrema of body temperature and room temperature.

So far I have found that my body temperature increases with room temperature more or less linearly. Both diastolic and systolic blood pressure decrease with increases in room temperature and body temperature. (as you might expect)

However, I found that the rate of change is much greater for me than the study on the internet. More than 3x-5x greater effect on my diastolic and systolic than the average in the study.

What was also worrying was that my body temperature (using my method of measurement) could almost be hypothermic without me even feel like shivering.

My method of body temperature measurement resulted in an average temperature of 36.4 C which could be on the lowish side. I measured it orally, and so other methods may give a more accurate measurement of inner body temperature. If you add 0.5C to my temperature measurements it should be about right.

One to think about when you are out skiing for a long time in cold weather. Particularly, for people over 50 for whom cold "is said" to have a more significant impact on body temperature (I have not seen anything which definitively proves this hypothesis, other than my own data)

My systolic is usually 40-50 above my diastolic. (probably closer to 50 on average) The systolic graph is similar, but slightly lower gradient.

Shocked

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17496471


Last edited by Poster: A snowHead on Tue 12-03-19 14:31; edited 1 time in total
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Get help!
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
I think I will wear a scarf more often in cold weather, and take more coffee breaks in warm up huts.
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@Bigtipper, very interesting. This might be useful - https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cswk3g In summary, core body temperature may be subject to more variability across the population than was previously understood. You may be a person whose average core temperature is lower than what was previously understood to be "normal". I don't know anything about blood pressure so not sure that's helpful!

Any excuse to drink more coffee sounds like a good one to me...

[edited to get hyperlink working]


Last edited by You need to Login to know who's really who. on Tue 12-03-19 16:44; edited 1 time in total
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@Sideshowbob, body fat percentage may have something to do with it (mine is very low), also I am older than the average age in the summary which also affects the body temperature. However, my blood pressure appears to be lower than average for my age, and is lower than it was when I was 20 years younger on average!

Your link is to a page which is no longer exists.

However, I think the years when I spent sleeping in the Tignes Val Claret car park at -15C had an effect on my reaction to cold. Makes me very sensitive to cold temperatures, causing my blood vessels to shut rapidly in the event of cold. Measuring my body temperature by oral temperatures may be too inaccurate, and rectal measurements may be necessary to get to core body temperature which may be higher. (I think I will use a different thermometer for that)


Last edited by Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do. on Tue 12-03-19 14:26; edited 3 times in total
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@Bigtipper, remove the full stop at the end,
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Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@Hells Bells, I get that now but I need to sign in and I am very wary of who I give one of my email addresses to. (I get too much spam as it is, and my person details are not secure enough so I have to make up fake names : -even though they know my IP address I am loathe to link it to real details which makes a mokery of their survey data)

The thought of what happens when I have a fever to my blood pressure when I look at the graph I produced suggests that I may become hypotensive and prone to fainting. I have not had a fever at any time in the last 2 years so I have no data on this scenario. Perhaps it is not a linear relationship and may be a flatter relationship above 37C?
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So I can download the mp3 file without registering, and I listened to the podcast. It is something I was aware of, that the method of measurement of body temperature and the calibration of the thermometer is important in accuracy.

I do not get temperatures or fevers in recent years, the only time I felt like I had a minor headache my temperature was 36.7C. This either confirms the podcast in that some people can have a fever at temperatures which appear normal, or that my thermometer is not accurate at oral temperature reading compared to rectal or aural. Armpit measurements are known to be much lower, and I have not even bothered with that as it is old medicine.
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Error bars would be helpful on that chart.
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I believe the R2 figure on the graph is an indication of goodness of fit of the data to the straight line. It is lower for the systolic graphs, and for graphs with room temperature. However, choosing the best graph based on goodness of fit data is data trawling. There is not yet enough data for me to fit any estimation of standard deviation. I could put the actual standard deviation, but that may be misleading as this does not take into account the measurement errors. In other words I need separate study, and more data to derive likely error data.

The best way to do it currently, would be to draw some lines so that most of the data points fit in the area between the lines. However, not sure there would be much more benefit of that than just including all the data points and the fitted line.

Join the dots?
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@Bigtipper,
I really think you should check what colour clothes you are wearing as well.
http://www.all-science-fair-projects.com/print_project_1078_134
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What is the measurement accuracy of the thermometer? 0.1C?
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Bigtipper wrote:
I believe the R2 figure on the graph is an indication of goodness of fit of the data to the straight line. ...
The best way to do it currently, would be to draw some lines so that most of the data points fit in the area between the lines. However, not sure there would be much more benefit of that than just including all the data points and the fitted line.

Join the dots?
Well, those data look very noisy to me, and you're making some assumptions which may not be correct.
I'm just saying that it may be unwise to reason from this.

You have a lot of data points clustered around some particular temperatures, but no explanation of the variation there.
Is it experimental error (I'm using "error" technically), or something else? What's the precision of these measurements?
Can you repeatedly measure the same value? Does the measuring tool have an accuracy written on it?
How long are you waiting for things to stabilize before recording the values?

The measurement at the left is a single point. Where you've repeated measurements there has been a significant spread, +- about half the axis range.
Having just the one point there means you really don't know where that ought to be on the axis, which is why I was asking about error bars.
If you ignore that single point, what's left doesn't look much like a straight line.

You can plot a curve between any two points (!), but it may not be a good idea to do so wink
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You know it makes sense.
@Bigtipper, With all your spreadsheets of alcohol consumption, blood pressure and temperature don't you think you are focusing rather too much on your vitals and on your health in general?
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Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Quote:

So far I have found that my body temperature increases with room temperature more or less linearly. Both diastolic and systolic blood pressure decrease with increases in room temperature and body temperature. (as you might expect)


What you've actually found is that your blood pressure fluctuates which is normal and at no stage is it a problem
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
As I said in the OP, I am still collecting data. Indeed there are many data points with only one entry. The clusters around my average body temperature of 36.4 suggests that this is where most of the readings will come on average. The outliers where the room temperature is low only occur when it gets cold. As I do not get a fever regularly, it is difficult to find any figures on that.

Over time I will collect more data, and the slope will change, as will the R2. However, at the moment it indicates that there is a possible relationship which has been proven with more substantial data. Obviously I need more data to prove the specific gradient in my case compared to the average. This will take more time to collect, it cannot be done overnight. (although that is when my body temperature tends to go down)

The problem with using systolic is that it tends to fluctuate for other reasons than temperature. It can be more volatile than diastolic in my experience. In measuring diastolic, it gives a better indication of the effect of temperature without any other influencing factors.


Last edited by Poster: A snowHead on Tue 12-03-19 17:47; edited 1 time in total
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@Bigtipper, why are you doing this?
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Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@holidayloverxx, sometimes there is no answer other than it is there. Knowledge about my body helps me look after it better. Knowledge about the population average, allows me to compare how "normal" or "supra-normal" I am.

I think the true answer is because "I can".
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@Bigtipper, Ah well, at least there's a reason Laughing
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