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DIN Settings

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
IanTr wrote:
....If conditions are right and I’m in the mood then I probably adopt “type III” behaviour for the odd run. That gives a chart setting of 8....

Does it? I would have thought it would only be equivalent to Jon ignoring the age adjustment, so still come out at 6.5.

To get to 8 you probably need to both ignore the age adjsutment and adopt "Type III" skiing. The one row age adjustment broadly recognises that average age say 65 skiers are not as fit, and their joints are not as flexible, as average age say 35 skiers. Only you know if you are still as fit as at 35, but with a failing knee I would be erring on the side of caution.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
.


Last edited by Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person on Thu 7-03-19 15:18; edited 1 time in total
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Thank you all for your thoughts. The age adjustment is (I think) a bit of a given! I’m not sure where caution lies though - too low a setting is probably as dangerous as too high. I wouldn’t like to lose a ski at speed.

Using http://www.mechanicsofsport.com/skiing/equipment/bindings/din-calculator.html I get:

______50+ 50-
Type II 6.0 6.5
Type III 6.5 8.0

I think I’m going to stick with 7 for now. I haven’t problems with that in the past, and it’s in the middle of the range that I occupy if >50/Type II comes out as a 6 and <50/Type III comes out as 8.

Edited to try to fix formatting problems caused by the conventional symbols for “less than” and “greater than”..!
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
Scooter in Seattle wrote:
Steilhang wrote:
@Scarpa, I really don't understand this. I have my bindings set at 6.5 and never have any unwarranted releases. I ski fast in all types of terrain*. Why do others need to have their bindings set so high?

*but don't have any air time!

Here's my answer to your question about why others set bindings high: I'm 62, 1.9m and 86kg. I used to race and I ski with a bunch of ex-DHers. I'm still at 8.5 DIN. If I crash I'll still release, but otherwise I need to stay in when its getting choppy and I'm flying. Eventually I know I'll start slowing down a bit and will dial 'em back in proportion. I've asked a bunch of shop guys and nobody really ever has an answer about age-related DIN-dialback. Lawyers may have something to do with that. Not saying everybody should do it my way. Safety first, and I think its safer for me to stay in.



Also, it's not all about speed but more about your style of skiing and your method of engaging edges. I ski with ex racers (they are amazingly fast) and still consider myself pretty much a punter compared with their levels but spending all my seasons in the Alps I sometimes get over 80 days skiing per year. I sometimes (when I f*ck it up) get rebound on FIS SL skis that bounces me into the air... landing into an opposite turn does need a fairly high DIN seting otherwise the ski can just pop off. Get onto race GS skis and you also get really high forces transmitted to the bindings. My off piste skis are set lower, in fact as low as I can go without them popping off on landings. For me this means 9 to 9.5 for off piste even though I'm now 51. It' not often I crash on piste skis... off piste is a very different matter as I like to play around.


Last edited by You need to Login to know who's really who. on Thu 7-03-19 21:03; edited 3 times in total
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
If in doubt drop the setting by 0.5 and see how you go on. If you haven't popped out in a month drop it again. I'd prefer to be as low as I can manage with for general skiing.
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Boot sole length also has an effect on predicted releases, a shorter length can increase the DIN setting quite a bit. I have a 304mm BSL and have had SL skis pop off at slow speed off piste at DIN 10 with no perceptable force applied to my legs.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
I think I'm about 6.5 or 7... I'm 172ish cm and 69 kg so not heavy... coming up on 48 soon and I try to not keep them too tight since I blew out my right knee last year and I don't want my binding to not release. That said, just spent the week skiing and bindings never released but also only fell once... maybe didn't ski hard enough or whatever. My knee is fine so the setting must have been good.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
ilovegreece wrote:
Hi

Just out of interest, what difference does it make if you are over 50 when they work out your DIN settings?

Thanks.


The Germans (creators of DIN/ASTM) base this on averaged bone density, ligament, tendon strength and musculature as per age. 50 (+)/ 9 (-) is a nice round number which obviously does not apply to all, but es ist das, was es mein Freund ist.................


Last edited by After all it is free Go on u know u want to! on Sun 24-03-19 1:32; edited 1 time in total
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
I really shouldn't read this type of thread at this time of night after a long day. I want to shout "yer all fullashoite" . . . but you're not. It's almost impossible for us average plebs to empirically measure each individual binding release force vectors (both nose and heel) and create an algorithm to use our multitudinous physical variations with those measurements. . .

Yup, bullshoite rolling eyes and whilst I have enormous respect for @spyderjon, not everyone and very few of us at 50 have bones crumbling to dust. Exercise, diet and activity can have bone strength retained into our 80s . . . but that does require an element of dedication and selfishness.

The better you ski, the better you can read the hill, the terrain you choose, the quality and certification of your bindings defines how you set you release values. I ski very hard on DIN5 . . . 'on piste' . . . doesn't work so well in off-piste crud. When I get better in the frozen crap I may well be able to slide on shoite with a DIN5 . . . so . . .

Should I practice on a low setting and enjoy the experience of free-fall . . . or wind them up and get the 'chopper' ride I've always wanted as my knee dissolves to jelly?
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Totally confused as to how all you very strong male skiiers can ski on DINS of 5, whereas the charts give 6.5 for a type 2, small, light female!
Can only think it’s because I have stupidly small feet, but why does that make such a difference? Intuitively I would have thought a short boot capable of exerting less leverage than a long one Puzzled
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
@swoafs, the 'force' the binding needs to hold you in the binding is 'amplified' by the longer lever of a longer boot sole.

So long boot sole means a lower DIN will hold you in the binding more, shorter boot sole means you need more DIN to hold you in (for a given skier weight).

The ' **** 's are because I suspect 'force' and 'amplified' are the wrong words really, but you get the drift.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@midgetbiker, so why is that conflicting in my head with my GCSE physics that the longer a “lever” (boot), the greater the force applied at one end when an equivalent force (eg upward projectile of skier body in a-over-t manoeuvre) is applied at the other end?

That would mean a longer boot would apply more force and need a higher DIN to hold it in than a short one???

Clearly I’m missing a fundamental point here because I do know you’re right, just can’t work out how!!
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
@swoafs, You're thinking about it backwards, it is the 'force' that the binding DIN is sending down the longer lever to keep you in the ski.

Imagine a see saw with a child sat on one end. The child's weight is trying to lift the other end of the see saw (pop you out of the binding) if you push down on the see saw on the other side to prevent this (DIN setting) then the further from the fulcrum you are (the longer the BSL) then the less force you need to prevent the see saw rising (lower DIN to stop you popping out).

I think.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
Here's the current DIN chart (2012/2013 was the last time it was updated)



Let's look at an under 50 yrs old 175cm tall type II skier skier weighing 76kg with a bsl of 305mm. The din setting would be 6.5 (ie the intersection of the horizontal line L and the 291-310mm bsl column). If you continue along the L line to the right hand end two columns you'll see the figures 58 and 229. These are the actual Nm of force required to twist laterally out of the toe binding (58 ) and pull vertically out the heel binding (229).

Note that all of the din settings detailed along line L (ie 7.5 / 7 / 6.5 / 6 / 5.5/ 5) all release the binding at 58/229Nm, the only difference between them is the boot sole lengths.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Brain is slowly processing (sure I used to think quicker in my yoof).... thank you @midgetbiker, and @spyderjon, for the explanations!
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