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plantar fachiitus

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
i"ve had severe plantar faciitus for the last year, and no amount of stretching, rolling massage balls and money spent on custom insoles is making any difference, as i am a postman and keen hillwalker this is having a big impact on my life, last years skiing holiday was nearly ruined by my painful feet, i had to frequently stop, take off my boots and put my foot in the snow. i am a bit reluctant to book up anything for this season as its a lot of money to pay for a week of pain when it should be a holiday, it looks like plantar faciitus is going to end my skiing career, and i"m devastated.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
I understand your pain. Through torn ACLs, Achilles tendinitis and tennis elbow (they say sport’s good for you!), plantar fasciitis was by far the most painful. The good news, I’m now painfree. I also did all the things you’ve mentioned and finally managed to get a steroid injection-life saver! Immediate relief (thanks to the local anaesthetic) and 2+ years on, not a bit of pain (I still wear the insoles) Good luck!
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Yes. Get a steroid injection. RELIEF!
Mine did return briefly- probably my fault- but instantly stopping running and return to stretching stopped it in its tracks (took 3 months or so but less painful and lengthy than first experience- which sounds horribly like your current one). It hasn’t returned since {circa 15 yrs)
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@compostcorner, I'm sure you are already following the advice never to walk around in bare feet, wear supportive footwear from the moment you step out of bed in the morning? Even going to the loo in the middle of the night. Hubby had it for a while, but not while skiing luckily. Occasionally returns, but only for a short while. You can get night splints to wear in bed too.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Insoles fortunately cleared mine up, but I'm surprised you have pain in the boots. For me, because the soles weren't moving about it was actually the only time I didn't have any pain. As above, have you looked at the night splints?

Hope you get it sorted, it's definitely no fun.
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compostcorner,

Sorry to hear that. I suffered from PF a number of years ago. I'd never heard of it & woke up one day to put my foot on the floor & thought I'd broken a bone in my foot overnight. One of the most painful injuries I've ever had.

I was booked on a hiking trip to Austria 4 days later and, in desperation, booked into a sports injury clinic that day. I'd resigned myself to missing the trip, then had 3 consecutive days of treatment (30 minutes each sesh), including ultrasound and (painful) aggressive massage. It was the best £75 I could have spent (2008 prices) and I managed to make the hiking trip. It remained uncomfortable and slightly painful for a while, though the physio gave me my own massage to carry out daily, which also helped. After a couple of weeks it cleared up completely - never to return.

I hope all goes well for you.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
thanks for all your thoughts, i have done everything that has been suggested above, but i seem to be getting nowhere, the injection worked for a couple of weeks then the pain returned, night splints didnt really do anything, i"ve just had a 6 week course of acupuncture, and that didnt work, so now i"m considering reflexology.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@compostcorner, this may be of interest.

https://physio-network-pn.com/plantar-fasciopathy-aka-plantar-fasciitis-important-research-by-michael-rathleff-2/
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@compostcorner, I had it for about a year (from running I think), and had a combination of PRP (platelet rich plasma) injections and exercises under the direction of a sports physio, like the above link. It’s gone. Completely.

Don’t know what did the trick but very relieved. I could hardly walk some mornings.
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Ski the Net with snowHeads
@compostcorner, acupuncture didn’t work?

I am amazed as all the research shows that it is complete bollox.

As is reflexology.

You have my sympathy but it seems that it usually self resolves over time, so fingers crossed.

But, please, don’t go wasting your money on crap “treatments”.
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snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
I had exactly the same problem/pain when I took up skiing about 5 years ago but I've found a cheap miracle cure which might help you.

I’d put the boots on first thing and within the first 400 metres would have to stop because the whole bottom and sides of my feet would cramp and burn. I’d have to lie in the snow or keep lifting a foot off the floor to get rid of the pain, but another 400 metres and it was back. It would ease early in the afternoon but I would dread the mornings. I tried painkillers, stretches, footbeds, different boots but no joy.

In the end I spent a long time reading articles and forums, did a bit of thinking and cured it this year. I came to the conclusion I was gripping too much with my toes, so I nipped down to Boots and bought two small rolled up bandages, about foot width wide, and put them into my socks so they would fit under my toes. About 75p each and bingo - pain gone! I couldn’t believe it!

I have them sitting just under the toe joints and they keep my toes slightly higher than the front of my foot, so when I ski it kind of levels the foot in a normal position and I can feel it slightly in my calf’s.

Hope this helps.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@compostcorner, Another (past) sufferer - serious pain, especially those first few steps in the morning, but now pain free - my 'solutions'

1) Ski boot custom footbeds transferred to slippers which were left in a convenient place by the bed to ensure first steps in the morning had full arch support

2) Regular massage of the 'plantar' using a wall paper joint roller - the handle enables you to get better pressure than using thumbs

3) Good Foot (USA company) plastic arch supports - for what they are, arch shaped flexible plastic. The flexible insole has the affect of massaging the arch on every step.

They are a complete rip-off price-wise - but they work for me

'Cheaper' E-bay alternative

f:0" target="_blank">https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/RB-ULTIMATE-Anatomic-arch-support-work-great-like-good-feet-Made-in-Germany/113027164459?hash=item1a50f1a92b:m:mHtk097P_R5zKOlza20uxmA:rk:6Neh Nehf:0
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
From the opposite perspective (causation vs cure), my PF was caused by buying shoes online (a month ago), that seemed to be the right size but did something peculiar to my left foot. I assumed they just needed to be worn in, but instead they caused PF.

Having giving up on the shoes after a week of pain, self-diagnosing PF, and thereafter striving to maintain arch support, the PF is now considerably reduced, but still noticeable.

So, I wonder if perhaps the cause needs to be considered too, as that may be a key part of prognosis and remedy.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
I think these are triggers rather than cause. The cause is probably simply BMI and the body physiology at a certain age. Most commonly in 40s and 50s.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
@crosbie,
Similar thoughts that the PF was caused by a change of footwear.
I had always worn decent 'walking' shoes for dog walking but bought some of the 'more comfortable' canvas-type shoes for the summer but they didn't have the arch support I was used to.
Back to the proper shoes and arch support now and it has taken 6 months to 'cure'.
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
ringingmaster wrote:
I think these are triggers rather than cause. The cause is probably simply BMI and the body physiology at a certain age. Most commonly in 40s and 50s.


Well, being 55 and overweight (17st @ 6'3") I guess I'm prone to it, and so I guess I can no longer treat my feet like slaves who'll put up with what I tell them to. Sad
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@codyaitch, yup, proper shoes from now on! Confused
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