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All mountain skis - around 90mm wide

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Raceplate wrote:
@Awdbugga, it's called tough love Toofy Grin

Touche' wink
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@Awdbugga, id say that @Raceplate has been fairly harsh, but generally fair. Have a look at how many people on this thread have suggested skis and how many have suggested to ski more first. Put the money in an ISA and worry about what you’ll buy after a few more trips, it’s just not worth thinking about all mtn yet, especially as you’ve already got your own skis.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@slopemad, the women's variant will have the binding mounted further forward, usually 1-2cm. Which makes it easier to get the tip in the snow which will make it feel grippier. So at the risk of upsetting the OP's sensibilities it basically means that you have the standard inexperienced skier's issue of a rearward balanced stance that standing further forward on the ski helped to compensate for.

Will feel good on a short term basis but do nothing for your long term development. You could just as easily buy a men's ski with a rail binding and move it forward one or two notches. As you get better and faster you will naturally feel that you need a longer shovel so you're not "going over the handlebars". At which point you can just move the binding back to the factory position. It's not conventional advice and I'm sure someone will moan at me but it'll work for your confidence.
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SnoodlesMcFlude wrote:
@Awdbugga, id say that @Raceplate has been fairly harsh, but generally fair. Have a look at how many people on this thread have suggested skis and how many have suggested to ski more first. Put the money in an ISA and worry about what you’ll buy after a few more trips, it’s just not worth thinking about all mtn yet, especially as you’ve already got your own skis.


Bugga, you're probably right. (quickly thinks of another reason Toofy Grin ) But at my age, I could be leaving things for a future that may never happen. Grasp the moment Awdbugga. wink wink

Seriously. You may all be right. (quickly thinks of another reason) The thing is, I've persuade my Mrs I need them. I'm not sure if I could manage that again. Confused Especially if @audfart lets slip that everyone advised me against buying them; as he is likely to do. What if I was to buy them and then leave them for when I am good enough to use them? That's a fair compromise, isn't it? Bugga, that would mean not selling my others, then she would become suspicious. Oh heck. Time for bed.
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Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@Awdbugga, I’m on the phone so brief.

I have skied around ? 1,300 days and I still find flat light crap. There is no solution. Kit is rarely the solution.

To be frank hehe and I am totally delighted that you are so in to skiing (very well done you) however, I think you have better problems to work on.

That said, I am known to be condescending around these parts...
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@Raceplate, thanks for the pointer.

I typically take the 160cm rental skis at CFe, out of habit mainly. I have taken the 170cm rentals on occasion though. (I am ~175cm, and as for weight - well, when I say I'm in shape, that's because round is a shape).

The Slight that I tested was 168cm and I'd be tempted to buy that one. Most of the other skis I tested were around the same size, the Legend X84s I tested were 177cm though and they felt very "meh!" to me when I ski'd them. The Speedzone 10s were 175cm though I did get a giggle out of them.

I definitely have a tendency to go back seat when the run stops being optimal and I find it difficult to get, for example when losing my rhythm after coming across human obstacles, or indeed skiing in and out of the ice in the middle and the crud at the sides. But then, I also occasionally get that 'over the handlebars' sensation.
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Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Penry wrote:
...
Better balance and a more relaxed posture will do far more to help you master different conditions than an extra few mm ...


That's what I've always said, but they never believe me Sad
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
under a new name wrote:
@Awdbugga, I’m on the phone so brief.

I have skied around ? 1,300 days and I still find flat light crap. There is no solution. Kit is rarely the solution.

To be frank hehe and I am totally delighted that you are so in to skiing (very well done you) however, I think you have better problems to work on.

That said, I am known to be condescending around these parts...


No, that's fine. I prefer condescending to tough love. Confused Feel free to blow as much smoke up as you want. I was kinda clutching at straws with the skis that handle chopped up snow better. I didn't expect for one moment it would cure the problem. I simply thought it may, just may, make it a little easier when going into a pile of crud you can't see. But obviously not from what everyone is saying. Oh well, back to botty puckering flying blind; or back to fishing. Confused
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@Awdbugga, I feel obliged to share that I bought 12 different pairs of skis in my first 11 years of skiing (approx. 60 weeks). I've only used 3 pairs in the last 9 years (approx. 40 weeks) and I didn't even like one of them - I just couldn't be bothered to find something better. It's not the skis.
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Awdbugga wrote:
Oh well, back to botty puckering flying blind; or back to fishing. Confused
I don't think those are your only two options. You seem pretty dedicated, which is great to see, so focus on keeping on improving your skills, and gaining experience of different terrain and snow. That's much better than trying to buy a skills upgrade with the latest shiny pair of planks.
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Raceplate wrote:
@Awdbugga, I feel obliged to share that I bought 12 different pairs of skis in my first 11 years of skiing (approx. 60 weeks). I've only used 3 pairs in the last 9 years (approx. 40 weeks) and I didn't even like one of them - I just couldn't be bothered to find something better. It's not the skis.

Can I interest you in a fishing rod?
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Awdbugga wrote:
Can I interest you in a fishing rod?

About as much as I can interest you in a pair of narrow waisted skis that would be the best thing ever for your long term skills development wink
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So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
@slopemad, reading between the lines, your weight is an issue so a ski that would normally be considered too stiff/long for a novice is not relevant for you. I'd stick with the Speedzone 10's.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
@Awdbugga,
Didn't realise you were in the early stages of learning to ski (something we all go through to become good skiers).
As others have said building skills and experience will pay more dividends in the long run.
Probably makes as much sense as learning to drive in a truck, better to start smaller (thinner, piste orientated) and build your way up.
In the long run you will most likely be a better skier if you concentrate on skills and not equipment, the choice is yours.

Until the snow gets signifcantly deep, wider skis will will cause more problems (esp on piste) than give an advantage for offpiste.

These are 83mm wide skis I was skiing in Feb 18
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
My GF has Experience 80s and is a nutter on hers. I've got some Salomon X8 (very similar to your Exp80) which I love and some Volkl Kendos (90mm wide) which I am simply not good enough to get the most out of and consequently I don't like them much. The X8s are super fast on piste, soak up everything and are very easy to carve. The Kendos are not!

Be careful what you wish for.
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
If you struggle with flat light, make sure you ski somewhere with plenty of trees. Outside of working on technique, nothing helps more. They work a bit like a sight screen and you can judge the lay of the land much better against the dark contrast.

P. S. Cody Townsend and Elyse Saugstad seem to spend their whole summer fishing on Instagram, so maybe that's the secret.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@Awdbugga, What you need are narrow piste skis and lessons on the slopes. But since you are spending a lot of time in a fridge, get your own skis rather than trying to learn on rentals.

Get used to railing them. Then practise the different stances on these to compensate for the different terrain. Eg piste slightly wider. More off to the side or in bumps, then bring the legs together. IE practise the technique for the terrain not get the kit to compensate for lack of technique. That has been my mistake in the past.

Once you master that with a set of piste skis you will be fine and ready to think about something wider.

Have a look at the instructors pottering around in Arabba etc. Most are on skinny short skis.

Me: I have Kaesle FX95HP for my all round ski and I'm getting a short SL style ski EG Nordica Doberman Spitfire, Redster SL or similar for pure piste fun.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
GlasgowCyclops wrote:
... I'm getting a short SL style ski EG Nordica Doberman Spitfire, Redster SL or similar for pure piste fun.


Nice Little Angel
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Awdbugga wrote:
. I simply thought it may, just may, make it a little easier when going into a pile of crud you can't see. But obviously not from what everyone is saying.


I’m not sure that’s what people are saying? A wider ski probably would be easier in crud, but most of the commentators are suggesting you should probably be focusing on developing a solid carving technique , which will be easier on a shorter radius (usually narrower waist) ski than worrying about mixed conditions.

You’re also unlikely to see a huge difference between an 80mm and 88mm waisted Ski.

On the other hand if you don’t like your skis, by all means buy something new. In my experience skis do make a big difference to your skiing enjoyment and there are some skis people click with immediately while others remain a struggle. There’s no substitute for testing yourself so take your time and choose something that puts a smile on your face.
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Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
AL9000 wrote:
Penry wrote:
...
Better balance and a more relaxed posture will do far more to help you master different conditions than an extra few mm ...


That's what I've always said, but they never believe me Sad



A more solid pole plant perhaps...?
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I think there is a bit of terminology alignment needed too. What you are saying is "crud" is just loose snow that gets piled up in places on a piste in the course of the day it sounds like - proper "British"* crud is very variable snow which can be real mashed potatoes or baby heads or even approach coral reef - you don't so much float over it as barge through it. Now piste conditions can approach proper crud but only on very wet or spring days. The idea of needing a crud buster ski for a skier who will be overwhelmingly be on groomed pistes is just an alien concept which is part of why you are getting so much pushback. For the piste loose snow the answer is technique to get the skis you are using to cut through it or pivot on top of it as appropriate. That is one of the things you can practice really effectively in a snowdome if you target the berms of sugary snow that build up to the side.


* Merikins seem to regard a perfect powder field with a couple of tracks through it as crud so they aren't totally reliable.
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@Awdbugga,

In flat light it's best to closely follow a friend down the piste, turning as they turn - particularly on runs that are unfamiliar to you. That way you can focus on the back of his/her jacket, you can preview the terrain (by seeing whether s/he) hits any bumps or drops; and it will stop you from feeling disorientated (which you do when you have nothing to focus on and your brain can't handle it).

Alternatively, if you are on piste on your own in flat light, you should focus on a piste marker (or lift pylon) and keep it in focus until you are nearer enough to the next marker down hill. Then change your focus to the second marker and repeat.

Good luck with whatever you decide with your skis. I would endorse the views of others - and suggest you go narrow.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Raceplate wrote:
@slopemad, reading between the lines, your weight is an issue so a ski that would normally be considered too stiff/long for a novice is not relevant for you. I'd stick with the Speedzone 10's.

During the Oktobertest, I asked Jon if there was something more fun than the Scotts and he did suggest something thinner and stiffer and pointed me at the Dynastar dudes. The Speedzone 10 was a good ski, easy to get on the edges and turn, rapid and stable, probably the fastest I've ever done the 180m top to bottom at CFe. I guess I worried they're a one trick pony - great on a nice groomed piste but I'm not sure how they'll handle on anything else.

But in this Brexit era, we're supposed to be ignoring the experts...

Ha, no, you may well have shifted me from the Scott skis and towards the Dynastars. I'm 15st and 5'10", most of my skiing is in the fridge, I assume the Dynastars will be fine if I end up somewhere outside, snowy and British (e.g. Scotland, Cumbria, etc). I didn't want £££ to be a factor, but with bindings the Scotts will end up being around £600. The Dynastars are £515 and I get a 15% discount off that in S&R. I tested the 175cm, but there is also a 167cm variant. Which would you suggest for my build? The Dynastar ski guide suggests my height less 5cm which would put me closer to the 167s, but does my weight put it back towards the 175s?

(Actually, the chat at the bottom of their website suggests 175cm for someone over 190lbs, which is me.).
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@Awdbugga,
You know what - F**k-it. You only live once. Get the skis you fancy or as near as (I get the feeling you're going to anyway!) I would still say go second hand or previous seasons (mine were three seasons out of date and cost a quarter of the new price) then you won't feel like you've parted with a big dollop of cash if you later come to feel you've made a terrible mistake!
I agree with the piste ski recommendations but start playing around at the edges and cross pistes when you're on the mountain.
Technique is important, it's what you need to work on, but so is fun. Buying stuff is fun. Skiing is fun. Have fun. Buy some skis!
snowHead Very Happy snowHead
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
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Flat light skiing sucks, no matter how good you are, and no matter what skis you are on.

There are two ways to make it fun:

1. Ski the trees
2. Ski to the bar
(Edit: 3. a couloir with nice dark rock walls works well too)

Given the right mindset you can temporarily trick yourself that you're having type 2 fun while really concentrating on perfect technique and treating it as jedi mind training, but the reality is that you have to either ski way slower with less flow than usual or increase your chances of a knee-destroying crash.

I will disagree with some of the posters here re. fat skis in flat light though. Personally they're my favourite (especially when old and beaten with no edges to speak of) for flat light on icy pistes, as then I have a legitimate excuse to sideslip striaght to the bar rather than having to try to ski properly or aggressively and risk blowing a knee up on a bump/dip/cat track I didn't see.


Last edited by Ski the Net with snowHeads on Fri 12-10-18 13:34; edited 1 time in total
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HotDogger wrote:
... You only live once. Get the skis you fancy or as near as ...
Aye, sometimes it's easier to just pay the money so you can worry about something else.
Trees are good for marginal light, but in a true white-out there'll be no one else out there because they all know it's pointless.

It might be a bit embarrassing having a ton of fancy gear if you're actually not experienced enough to use it, mind.
I'd spend the cash on acquiring 100 days slope time, after which you can spend down days giving advice to others on the internet.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Quote:

I'd spend the cash on acquiring 100 days slope time, after which you can spend down days giving advice to others on the internet.

Toofy Grin Toofy Grin Toofy Grin
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
@slopemad, I'd be pleased to quote you for the Scotts/Dynastars.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
spyderjon wrote:
@slopemad, I'd be pleased to quote you for the Scotts/Dynastars.

And I'd be pleased to receive it wink

I'm also potentially in the market for some super el cheapo kids skis for a 5 1/2 year old little madam, the sort of "this old pair have been gathering dust in the store room for the past 3 years, take them off my hands" thing that crops up from time to time. The rentals she uses at the moment are 107cm. Whilst the boy is getting into racing (he was zooming round on Sunday), she seems more drawn to freestyle and I'm trying to steer her away from snowboards Toofy Grin
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
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slopemad wrote:
The Speedzone 10 was a good ski, easy to get on the edges and turn, rapid and stable, probably the fastest I've ever done the 180m top to bottom at CFe. I guess I worried they're a one trick pony - great on a nice groomed piste but I'm not sure how they'll handle on anything else.

But in this Brexit era, we're supposed to be ignoring the experts...

Ha, no, you may well have shifted me from the Scott skis and towards the Dynastars. I'm 15st and 5'10", most of my skiing is in the fridge, I assume the Dynastars will be fine if I end up somewhere outside, snowy and British (e.g. Scotland, Cumbria, etc). I didn't want £££ to be a factor, but with bindings the Scotts will end up being around £600. The Dynastars are £515 and I get a 15% discount off that in S&R. I tested the 175cm, but there is also a 167cm variant. Which would you suggest for my build? The Dynastar ski guide suggests my height less 5cm which would put me closer to the 167s, but does my weight put it back towards the 175s?

(Actually, the chat at the bottom of their website suggests 175cm for someone over 190lbs, which is me.).

To some extent they are a one trick pony but it's a very good trick and they're a perfect development tool. You could get away with the 167cm in the dome but it'll do you no favours when you take them onto a mountain. At your weight, I would definitely recommend the 175cm for stability.

Also, at some point in the future you're likely to want an all mountain ski in an 80-100mm width and that will need to be c185cm for your weight. Assuming you pick something with some rocker it will ski much shorter so it won't feel like too much of a step up from a 175cm. If you go from 167cm to 185cm it could be a little intimidating.

If it helps, I'm 179cm and fluctuate between 14-15st depending on whether I'm skiing or sat behind a desk for six months. The skis that I own but don't like are the well respected Head Magnums. I bought them in an end of season sale in a 170cm (only length left) and have forever wished that I had bought a 177cm. Obviously I'm way more experienced than you but my favourite skis when I very much considered myself a developing skier were all 176/177cm even though I was lighter then. My daily driver these days is a full cambered, no rocker 83mm ski in a 183cm and I am eternally grateful to the French ski tech who categorically told me I should take them in a 183cm rather than a 173cm - he was bang on.
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
@slopemad, may be able to help you out with kids skis as ours are 6 and 8 and the little one is sizing up this year. Where are you skiing?
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@Raceplate, haha - I think I took the Bonafides out 3 times in a 180 before I accepted my friend's advice that 173 was quite adequate.

Be careful about the epithet "ski tech" however! Their background is not always so obvious. A ski tech I knew, was a former Olympian ...
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Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@under a new name, IIRC, you are a bit shorter and about 30kg lighter than myself and @slopemad, so that sounds perfectly reasonable for the Bonafides.

My skis are Kastle MX83's that are only available from one shop in Courchevel and I have no doubt at all that all the boys in there can ski. I didn't even realise that the ski tech was French until he told me because he'd done so many back-to-back seasons he spoke English like an Aussie!
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slopemad wrote:
The Scott Slights, oddly, felt less 'slidey' when skating around than the Vantage, suggesting they weren't as waxed. Not sure about the edge. It was the 'W' ski which I tested though, and I'm not sure if the woman's variant has any difference other than the colour?

The Titans were fun and although I only had three runs on them, I had felt I'd been having a bad night on the rentals and the Titans immediately made me feel better about how I was skiing tonight. I think I'd rate them up there with the RTM 79 I tried on Sunday, but I felt better with the Scott. They were the only ski I didn't want to give back.


Titans are a very good ski, they helped me improve my skiing no end.
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