Ski Club 2.0 Home
Snow Reports
FAQFAQ

Mail for help.Help!!

Log in to snowHeads to make it MUCH better! Registration's totally free, of course, and makes snowHeads easier to use and to understand, gives better searching, filtering etc. as well as access to 'members only' forums, discounts and deals that U don't even know exist as a 'guest' user. (btw. 50,000+ snowHeads already know all this, making snowHeads the biggest, most active community of snow-heads in the UK, so you'll be in good company)..... When you register, you get our free weekly(-ish) snow report by email. It's rather good and not made up by tourist offices (or people that love the tourist office and want to marry it either)... We don't share your email address with anyone and we never send out any of those cheesy 'message from our partners' emails either. Anyway, snowHeads really is MUCH better when you're logged in - not least because you get to post your own messages complaining about things that annoy you like perhaps this banner which, incidentally, disappears when you log in :-)
Username:-
 Password:
Remember me:
durr, I forgot...
Or: Register
(to be a proper snow-head, all official-like!)

New snowboard boots - much pain is normal?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Hey there,

I‘m wondering how much pain is still normal when breaking-in new snowboard boots? Do they have to hurt if they fit properly? In discussions with friends there were mixed opinions.

I‘m currently having an issue with my new boots and I‘m worried that I‘ve wasted a lot of money on them.

This season I replaced my snowboard boots. I got the Nitro Crown TLS, which have the same size and similar features as my previous pair of Nitro Monarch TLS. They are just a tiny bit stiffer.

The old ones were my first boots and they were comfy from day one. They still fit, i.e. I didn’t have any heel lift etc. I can’t recall having any pain at all!
I was still a beginner though, so maybe falling on my knees and bum was distracting me from any other pain 😉. Or maybe I wasn’t riding “hard” yet and covering less distance, making it easier for my feet to get used to the boots?

The new ones are a different story unfortunately! It‘s my third trip now and the pain doesn‘t stop:

Trip/week 1: On day 1 my toes on both feet really hurt, it felt like they would fall off. This pain got less on day 2 and 3 and was gone on day 4-6. I also had slight abrasions on both ankles.

Trip/week 2: My left foot was fine, my toes too, but the outside ankle of my right foot really hurt badly. No abrasions but my ankle was very swollen for quite a while afterwards.

Trip/ week 3, starting today: After day one today my right ankle hurts badly again, even though I bandaged it to provide some cushioning. It’s especially painful when I stop or when I‘m on the lift with the full weight of my snowboard on my right foot and then having to skate away.

I’m riding goofy so it’s my front foot. So maybe this is why it’s only this foot? There is a harder L-shaped padding to keep the heel in place and I think this is pressing against my ankle on the wrong place.

My questions

- Do you think this is still normal pain when having new boots? And thus likely to go away? I’ve given up hope.
- Did your new snowboard boots hurt, if so how long and how bad?
- Any idea what I can do about it? I bought some silicone pads today and will try them tomorrow. I recently changed my right binding angle from 21 to 18, not sure if going further down to 15 could help?
- Do you think there could be an issue with the boot, i.e. the heel padding in the wrong place? Or the liner too small? It’s hard to tell, maybe I need to compare to a new pair in my shop back home. Did you ever experience a wrongly shaped boot?

Sorry for the long post, but I’m worried about my ankle, my money and this holiday, so it would be interesting to hear your experiences. Many thanks!
latest report     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@Simony, Sorry to hear you are having boot pain. I would say that it is not normal for snowboard boots to give this much pain.

My boots never gave me problems nor did Mrs cad's or son #1 or #2.

To save your current trip: If your ankle is swollen then ice it and take ibuprofen or similar to get the swelling down. Then I would suggest hiring a different pair to see if it improves the situation.

You need to be on the mountain, worry about your current boots when you get home.

The only time I can get boot pain is if I lace them up too tightly especially over the top of the foot.

Best wishes for getting it sorted.
latest report     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Snowboard boots are not supposed to hurt, so you're right to question it! Very Happy

If you are stuck with boots that are painful, have a look at replacing them with something better fitting, or if you're feeling creative, do some modding Toofy Grin

My current boots really hurt the toe on one foot, until the toenail went black and fell off. I've fixed it by cutting a small hole in the boot liner at the pressure point, and a bit of tape as an air seal. Problem solved and my toe has survived 6 more weeks without pain.

Another option is to remove some of the padding from the liner at the pressure point, which I've done on the top of the other foot to ease a sore spot.

For the ankles, a circle of padding can help take the pressure off a sore spot.

Good luck Very Happy
snow report     
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
@Simony, just a quick check, have you changed your binding angles and or stance width when setting up your board? Plus try your old liners in your new boots and visa versa and see how that feels.
snow report     
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Have you had them heat moulded? I would think after 3 weeks of use it's probably not necessary, but maybe worth getting them into a shop for a fitting, and possibly have a look at custom insoles as well.

When I've had foot pain, I've found reducting binding angles, stance width, and not strapping them down too tight can help as well.
ski holidays     
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
@cad99uk,
Hire boots might be an option, thanks. Although I’m in the Dolomites so not exaxtly in snowboarders heaven, so not sure what they have to offer. I’ll go with Ibuprofen and padding for now and see how it goes. Thanks for your wishes too.

@Robin Agogo,
I heard of toe nails falling off from a friend of mine too, and never understood how this can happen. Well, now I can.
I’ll first take them back to the shop to see what they say and if they can’t do anything I might as well become creative as you say. Thanks for the idea.

@auntie masque,
I changed the angles (not because of the foot but to protect my knee) and kept the stance. I might just change it further and try it out.
Good idea trying the old liners/boot shell separately. Thanks.

@hang11,
They are not heat moulded. I asked the shop and they said nobody really does it. Also, I would be too afraid to stand in a wrong position as I’m not on my board and it would be moulded in a wrong shape. I’m quite happy I didn’t do it as then I would blame the moulding for my pain and think I have destroyed them. Wink Are yours heat moulded?
I will try with an angle change, hope this will help. Thanks for your thoughts.
snow report     
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
You should be able to remove the L shape pads. They are there to help with heel lift.
Would have thought they would have have 'given' by now if your into your 3rd week.
Liners generally pack out one whole size.

Unfortunate, just because they are the same make boot, does not mean they will be a like for like fit.
Having a quick look at the specs, the liners are different. So they could have different density.
You could try heat molding the liner or better yet, changing the footbeds for thiner ones to see if it gives that little bit more room
snow conditions     
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@Simony, Wouldn't worry about messing them up with heat moulding, the shop heats them up, you put them on, and stand still for half an hour, and it's done.

If it's any help, I had a pair of salomon synapse boots for 7 years, that were super comfortable. Replaced them with the same model from a few years on in the same size, and they were really uncomfortable. Got them heat moulded and custom insoles done, and they have been fine ever since. A lot of boots can be heat moulded a few times as well I think.

If you haven't had it done, take them along to a boot fitter, and get them sorted. Costs a bit more, but may well make a huge difference. As will decent insoles, the ones that come with boots are usually cheap rubbish.
snow report     
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
How did you size your boots ...by buying your shoesize online ?

Do you ever do any lower leg exercise and flexibility exercise in the legs and ankles?

Footpain issues can fall into common catagorys with riders doing a week or two a season.
Its not 100% the boots that are always at fault .
Generally they are oversized in volume and lenght and the rider does nothing more than, drink ,smoke and has randon sex to increase fitness and ankle flexion ???
Zero flexion training has a obvious outcome and the footpain from that is blamed 100% on the tools or boots not the rider

Leg training or specific snowboard lower leg training and flexion is NEVER considered ....yet boarding is done at speed under force of load and not at ones daily levels of exertion or flexion ...other sports do not always correlate to the training needs of flexibilty required for snowboarding .


Last edited by You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net. on Thu 5-04-18 16:37; edited 5 times in total
snow conditions     
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Which although nice the booze an sex... isnt a very good training program at all but its about the exact same level of thought and effort put into snowboard physical preparation of the legs !

Which is zero in reality
As snowboarding is done at speed under force of speed and falline therefore the bootfit needs and physical flexion training needs..... must follow those forces put through the boots.
snow report     
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
@Mr.Egg, I also thought that after a week of breaking them in it should be fine. I‘ll investigate the L-shaped padding when back home.

The new boots are indeed a bit stiffer than the old model, but on Nitro’s scale of 10 the difference is only one point, so I wouldn‘t have thought it makes a big difference. The comfort of the liners is even given with 9/10, not for me apparently Wink

I‘ll look into footbeds too. Do you have any recommendation?

@hang11, Interesting to hear that you had similar troubles. I thought it‘s the safest option to go for the same (or similar) boots of the same manufacturer. Apparently it‘s still a bit of a gamble if they fit. Sad
I‘ll think about heat moulding, just need to find a shop which has some experience with it.

What can a boot fitter do for tweaking snowboard boots? Is it the heat moulding and the insoles you mention or anything else on top of it?

Regarding the custom insoles, how does it work?

@Tirol 164, I bought them in a snowboard shop in the same size as my old boots (similar model, same brand) which I tried on in the shop and used without any problems. It‘s my shoe size plus 1/3.

I had a chat regarding the size and the guy said that it is a common misconceptions to think that snowboard boots have to be bigger than your normal shoe size. Do you disagree?

I agree with you that a good fitness and flexibility helps to avoid injuries and pain. I do some sports at home, but I don’t do any specific exercises for my ankles and knees, maybe I should in the future.
Anyway, in my case here I don‘t think my pain is related to fitness issues but to something in the boot pressing against my ankle in the wrong place.

Besides, I‘m not sure if you are trying to say my foot pain is resulting from me drinking, smoking and having random sex...?
latest report     
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@Simony, I recently gave up smoking, feet are still fine Very Happy

Custom footbeds involve standing on a machine that takes an impression of your foot, then moulding a footbed using that impression, and fitting that footbed properly into the boot.

Loads of ski shops do it. I think your first port of call would be to get your boots properly fitted and see what that does. It can make a huge difference to comfort.
ski holidays     
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
I have custom footbeds - they are only a few mm thick - a lot thinner than the liners that come with my boots.
As they are custom fit, they are moulded to the base of your foot & support where you need support - so cushioning is not really required.
As they are thinner, this gives a few extra mm.

I have both Sidas & Superfeet custom liners (need to be done in a shop with the right equipement).
I prefer the Sidas - but I use both & I use them in other footwear during the rest of the year!

You could take the footbeds out of your boots & just try them around the house & see if they feel better. At least it will give you an idea if more room in the boot will help.
snow conditions     
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
@Simony, Sounds more like a liner padding problem than a footbed issue. Assume you've hauled out the liners and given them a proper going over - make sure nothing is getting folded in and putting excess pressure on that area. It could be the J-bar (or whatever) padding piece, the positioning could be that it just doesn't line up with your ankle configuration. Make sure you're not over-tightening the boot as well.

I had a similar issue with my new Burton Rulers for the first couple of outings. If I do them up in a particular way, then it feels like I've got something pressing down on my ankle bone. I have to release them, have a bit of a shift about, and re-tighten them and I'm good for the day.
snow conditions     
 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
If its not a over sizing or a physical ankle flexion issue which are common

Try checking the following

I once found that the ankle J bar which is internal on a pair of nitro Anthem liners had gone very hard for some odd reason.
This was easy to feel by hand with both liners out of the shells as 3 Jbars areas were normal and one was solid

I kneaded the hardened Jbar area very hard while it was still sewn inside the liner for like ten minutes with my knuckles until it went soft .
I am fairly sure this particular ankle J bar had deterioted as you could feel and hear it crushing as I went at it ..
Completely soft afterwards but fixed the hot spot .
ski holidays     
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
@Simony, Go to a shop in the resort and get some ski boots.
Wear those around for half a day, and then decide if your snowboard boots are really that bad after all ?
Smile

No don't do that I am being flippant.


Just out of curiosity is this with the same board?
Or a board of a different stiffness / vibration damping qualities?
Are the bindings the same bindings and the same high back angle?
Do you use top caps or over-toe straps?
Do you ratchet them up to the same point every time?
Do you remove snow build up under the binding periodically through the day?
The 18 deg angle does not sound excessive, but then if combined with an ultra-gangsta stance it could give you pain.

Whilst the boots are probably to blame, its worth contemplating some of the other set up parameters which could have an inout into this.
snow report     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@hang11, thanks for the explanation. Will look further into this when back home.

@Mr.Egg, good to know it doesn‘t have to be a winter sports specific insole. If I can use them e.g. in my hiking boots too, I‘d be more inclined to spend the money without knowing if it helps.

@Richard_Sideways, Yeah, I had the liners out, checked and back in a couple of times.
I‘m pretty sure now that it‘s the L-shaped padding pressing exactly on my ankle bone. I‘m just not sure yet how exactly the position of the padding (or my foot) is wrong.
Maybe custom insoles would slightly change my foot position and help. Or maybe my ankle and the padding are just not compatible.
I‘ll try to follow your Burton boots procedure tomorrow.

@Tirol 164, Thank you, I just followed your idea and checked if any padding is harder than the other. Unfortunately it‘s not (that would be cool because then I would return them to the shop), but I‘ll check them again when the liners are outside the boots.
I‘ll keep the destruction of the padding in mind as a last resort, I might just use a hammer Very Happy

@WindOfChange, Haha, every time I see skiers stomping around with their boots I pity them...not because they could just switch to the dark side Wink Very Happy

I use the same board, same bindings, bindings as toe caps (always have, tried as toe strap once and it felt weird), not sure if I ratched them up to the same point all the time, I guess so. I do it until it feels tight enough but not so much that I feel the straps.
I remove the snow on my left (back) foot everytime before I go on a chairlift, but I only check my right (front) foot when I take the board off completely. On this trip on the Dolomites I ride quite a few gondolas per day, so I do it regularly, but I‘ll keep this in mind for the future.

Regarding the settings, my stance is the same. It’s not overly wide and I don’t want to narrow it, because it was too narrow in the past. I could only widen it more?
High backs settings should be the same, but I’ve never really played around with it. Any idea which change could help?
I‘ve switched the angles to from -15, 18 to -15, 15 on Monday and I think it helped a bit.
snow conditions     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@All,

https://whitelines.com/snowboard-gear/before-you-buy/snowboard-boot-fitting-essential-guide.html

I found this article about how to find out if a snowboard boot fits. I did everything mentioned there and even walked around in the shop for about 20 minutes while trying on helmets. So I don‘t know what to do differently next time?!
The only thing I did not do, is measure my feet or have them measured. Is it something you did?

By the way, my ankle still hurts but it hasn‘t become as worse as on my last trip. I think the change of my binding angle from 18 to 15 helped a bit.
Or it‘s the additional padding I applied (silicone pads, neopren bandage and cotton rounds).
ski holidays     
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
Bootfit oversizing realization and lack of physical flexion is often a very hard set of pills to swallow so give yourself some time .
Spyderjon termed it the bootfit Perfect storm .

Ps.How did you get half the chemist shop in your boots with your feet ?
ski holidays     
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
@Tirol 164,
Quote:

Ps.How did you get half the chemist shop in your boots with your feet ?


I was wondering that too, but somehow it (just) works Very Happy
snow report     
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Heh! A friend of mine had ketchup packets in hers bound together with micropore tape to cushion a bony ankle.
snow conditions     
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@Richard_Sideways, haha, that’s very creative! Very Happy So if there is no pharmarcy, just go to the next burger place
snow report     
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Another recommendation for aftermarket insoles/custom footbeds. I recently bought a new pair of boots whilst away and had discussions with the guy who was fitting my boots about sizing, arch support and toes touching/squashed against the inside of the liner. He measured my feet, recommended boots the same size as my normal trainers and suggested an aftermarket insole (superfeet carbon). The boots were a little sore for a few days but now are great and I rode 10 days in a row with them. I got them in resort in Canada. I also had this approach in two other shops in Canada where I didn't buy so I assume its the standard boot fitting method over there. They also mentioned the number of days riding per season was a factor, if for example someone was to planning to do a season they may recommend a slightly smaller boot, expect to be in some discomfort for a week or so and then to boot will "pad out" and it'll be good for the remainder of the season (usually considered 100 days in North America). I ride about 18-24 days so he went with the approach above.

I will say this was a difference experience to buying boots before in the UK where a reputable snowboard shop has twice recommended going up a size from my street shoe and not mentioned nor suggested an aftermarket insole. Two out of three shops in Canada mentioned aftermarket insoles that both provide the right amount of arch support for your foot type but also stops your foot slipping forward and crushing your toes against inside of the liner. They said many boot manufacturers put the minimum standard insole/footbed in the boot and assume most people will replace it with their own. I looked at a side by side comparison of my new boot insole with the aftermarket insole and could easily understand how it would end up hurting.
ski holidays     
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@0xley, That‘s interesting to know. At least my shop said the same regarding the boot size to be the same as the normal shoe size. Just need to look into insoles now.

What I don‘t understand is why you would buy a smaller size when you do a full season, but not when you do a few weeks per season only? If it „pads out“ after a week, it will also do so when that‘s my only week?

Although I indeed had the feeling that my old boots got
a bit looser after I once wore them for a month in a row. But I don’t think that’s because of the number of days in a row as such, but because they got soaked in rain really badly and we didn‘t have a boot dryer, so they were constantly wet from sweat too Confused

I wonder how many days boots are supposed to last?
snow report     
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
@Simony On the sizing issue I think he was suggesting that as most people doing a season in Canada are young and usually skint, either making a stash of money last the whole season or working low pay jobs and tips to fund their stay. They don't want to get 2/3rds of the way through a season and their boots fall apart or become too slack. Also seasonnairs often wear the boots all day even when not riding for example stood working on a lift. Hence they buy/get recommended a half size or more too small, suffer discomfort for a week to ten days and then enjoy the boots for the rest of the season. If you've only got a short stay you don't want your holiday ruined by discomfort for over a week.

I once read an article in a snowboard mag (might have been online) that boots are supposed to last 100 days. Obviously that will vary if someone is doing a season vs someone riding 12 days a year split between two holidays. Then you factor in storage, drying conditions, how they've been looked after and perhaps been used? Have they been used just for riding or have they been worn whilst working on a lift, riding a snow mobile, working on a dry slope? Have they been stood around the bottom of a slope with grit/salt on the paths, have they danced in all night at Apres and got covered in beer?

My old boots have still got a few weeks left in them when I bought my new pair, hence I can now give the new pair a rest every few days so they last longer. It also means I get to wear a loser more flexible pair and have an easy day.
snow report     
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
Just my 2 cents^^

Definitely not ok to have pain, unless maybe after a whole day of boarding and very mild pain.... Like, because you are not used to it, not because they really are too small in some place.

I struggled a lot with finding boots for me. The first boots I bought i had to shelf after 1 week because they turned out to be bad.. I tried ALL of burton models and none of them fit. I finally found northwave brand and those were good. They aren't ideal but they are medium flex, so they hold the foot well, even though inside they are rather soft.

I'd say keep trying one different brands, one of them is bound to have a fitting model.
snow report     
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@0xley,
Ok, I see where he’s coming from. The concept implies that the one-week-per-season rider is quite tame with regards to the usage of his boots, then it makes sense.

My old boots fall in the range of the expected days, they had around 100 days/three years. But they are really done. As you say, it wasn’t mainly the riding as such that wore them out, but a lot of walking in town (I preferred walking to ski busses), après, and the fact they were drenched for so long.

I now take better care of my new boots, I got some boot dryers and they really help. I also try to avoid walking on concrete too much, but let‘s see how long I‘ll keep this up. Little Angel Very Happy Currently it’s not much fun to walk or dance anyway because of the pain they still cause.
ski holidays     
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
@Atissa, Yes, I’ll first try to fix the current boots, but if it doesn’t help, I’l look out for other brands.

The thing I like about Nitro is their lacing system. They have separate lacing for lower and upper part of the boot, so I can tighten these areas separately just as I need. I also find it easy to tighten, retighten during the day or open.

When I had hire boots, I struggled with various other systems. There were boots with normal ordinary shoelaces, which I couldn’t do up tight enough.
Other boots had a kind of wheel for the lacing, which I found hard to fiddle around with, half of the time it didn’t work properly.
Is the Northwave lacing similar to Nitro? On the pictures I just saw it looks like it. If you came across any other brand that has it, just let me know.
snow report     
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
I think it's been said and you probably know, but I'd be very wary of over tightening soft boots. It may be worth thinking about what you're doing and why, or (no offence: I've not seen you ride) take a lesson and get someone to look closely at your riding

If you are a directional rider or have a directional stance then you may be able to work out what the cause is from that.

Talk of being a beginner would suggest that the issue may be how you're progressing. Snowboarding's easy to do badly.

Or take up no-boarding and just wear Sorrels. That's kind of a joke, but there's a serious point to it. On a no board you don't lace the boots up tight because it makes them hard to get into and you're not relying on their stiffness to turn the board. If you're looking for more from your boots, then that could be the cause of the problem. I'm a hard-booter, but sometimes I have to use soft gear, and it's important when I do that for me to remember that they're soft because they're supposed to be soft. Use it, don't fight it. And finally.. kind of another joke, but with another point to it... ride more powder.
snow report     
 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
The OP has stated that he or she hasnt had her feet measured in mm/cm for cm/mondo sized bootfit and thats just one fit aspect of bootfit... so will never ever not have issues.
Thats just for starters the physical side is next .

Unless they focus on using someone such as a real bootfitter who knows what they are doing, failure will run on for 20-30 yrs .
Its not uncommon at all .

The point possibly why your focusing so heavily on lace systems ease of use can or could be..... with oversized boots your continually trying to crush the oversized lenght and/or volume boot around the foot to stabilise the foot in the boot .
Ie stop the foot swimming in the boot.

Thats exactly where the footbed in a oversize boot is advised by salesman ...its a bandaid upsell.
Footbeds help stabilise the foot if made correctly but ...you dont buy/put them in a boot oversized in volume and lenght .
ski holidays     
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
@Simony, Yeah, it has double lacing system on the outside. I have this model: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Northwave-Womens-Opal-Snowboard-Boots/dp/B015FQFHOM?tag=amz07b-21

I don't remember exactly, but i think some newer Burton models had it too. And maybe they would fit you, they are normally considered good, I just have weird feet i guess so I had to try one 50 different ones xD
ski holidays     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@philwig, Thanks for your ideas.
I‘m thinking of taking some private lessons next season anyway.
I have a twin board and duck stance with -15 15 now, but don‘t ride switch very often.
I haven‘t heard about no-boarding before, would be interesting to try it once!

@Tirol 164, How do I identify an oversized boot? I‘ve just measured my foot length and lengthwise my boots are the correct size according to Nitro‘s sizing table. Is there a way to find out for the volume?

@Atissa, Thank you. When you tried on all the different boots, did you already realise right in the shop they are uncomfortable?
ski holidays     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
It may be worth posting over on snowboardingforum
wiredsports is a bootfitter & will give you advice if you post pics of your feet measured length & width.
snow conditions     
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
With regard to stance, how do you stand 'normally' i.e. when not on the board - an over angled stance can put a lot of pressure on the outside of the foot as you're effectively leaning on the boot wall attempting to roll your foot over while locked into position. When you put pressure on your toes, it should feel even across your toes, not concentrated in either your big or little toes.

Also make sure that your stance width isn't too wide or narrow, and when you're riding you're knees aren't coming together as that also affects how the pressure is distributed when you're riding.
ski holidays     
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
I think there's a whole lot of over-thinking going on here.

The boots may well be the wrong size, but probably not since from what the OP describes they seem to have been a little tight around the toes to start with, then broken-in enough to be comfortable.

It sounds like the OP just has a hot spot around the ankle bone (not uncommon at all). Heat-moulding (which hasn't been done) could easily sort that out.
snow report     
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
@All, A little update in case you are interested: I went to my local shop to see what they say. Unfortunately it turned out that the shop is closing down today! Shocked Crying or Very sad
So there wasn’t much they could do anymore.

They had a look at the padding of the inliners though. In my right boot it looks like the L-shaped padding on my painful ankle is positioned too low, i.e. the position of the padding on the outside ankle is in a lower position than the padding on the inside ankle. In my left boot both paddings have the same height.

They gave me some contact names and I now have to deal with Nitro directly to see if the boot is defective. Let’s see how it goes.


@Mr.Egg, Thank you! Will see what Nitro says first, but keep the forum in mind to check it out!

@Richard_Sideways, Hm, after the first week of riding I can’t recall feeling any particular pressure on my toes, so I think that’s a good sign.
Regarding the binding angles, just out of interest I once did a check sitting on a desk with my legs hanging down to see which angle my feet will automatically go. It was quite hard to do without thinking about it and changing their position Very Happy, but it confirmed my angle at that time. Since then I’ve narrowed it quite a bit.

@stevomcd, The first week riding was just acceptable pain breaking it in, I agree. But the ankle thing is something else, maybe the padding is really defective, let’s see.
snow report     



Terms and conditions  Privacy Policy