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changes in ski instructing techniques...

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
David

I noticed below you mentioned strict ski instruction in Austria on your first skiing trip in the 1950's. There is a bar in Val D that has a picture on the wall of a group of french ski instructors in the 1950's or early 60's. Obvious differences were the clothes, but on closer inspection, I noticed how much older and serious they looked. Most of them looked in their 30's, 40's and older. A much different demographic from now I would suggest.

You talked about staying on the nursey slopes for days before going anywhere near lift. Compare that to now where first dayers are going up lifts and a trend towards learning parallels from the off. Apart from the equipment and clothing, I wonder what else has changed?
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
There seems to be little if any instruction on piste safety, ie. where to stop, who has right of way and that sort of thing.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Skis were very difficult to turn in the 1950s, and leather boots didn't transmit leg movement very efficiently, so the process of learning was slower. The stage from snowplough to parallel was particularly tiresome.

It sounds an old-fashioned thing to say, but the sidestep is a valuable intuitive way for people to feel their ski edges, and there's something to be said for spending the first few hours making a bit of effort, stepping up the slope, doing safe little runs, getting a full grasp of braking technique.

What we don't need are out-of-control skiers. Sermon over.
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
David Goldsmith, don't they teach that anymore? The sidestepping and short straight ploughs to a stop were the first few days of my skiing life.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Sidestepping is still taught in the PSIA, as are other drills. One thing I noticed was that some of the things I was taught when I was learning to ski in Europe are considered more intermediate exercises in the US, e.g. side-slipping
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Yes, it is taught that way by any good professional A good teacher will always keep the speed of the pupil comfortably under control, on slopes which are carefully chosen.

The problems tend to start when the instructor's not looking!
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
yep, you cant beat the first day skier, taken up the top of a red run by his mates who have convinced him it will be easy.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Back in 2000 when I learnt, we spent the day trying to remain upright on the nursery slope. The instructor was excellent, and we weren't allowed near the poma until the very end of the first day. By which time we could almost stand up without falling over (although I distinctly remember the nursery slope was nearly vertical!!) I honestly thought at the time that they must have made a mistake and the nursery slope was actually a black - it seemed so steep! It felt like we were doing 100mph in our straight snowploughs. Of course, it turned out to be slower than walking pace, but it certainly didn't feel like it.

Of course, look back on it with fond memories! But I did sympathise with a learner we took to Cairngorm who said the slope was WAY too steep! It was right up at the top and barely off horizontal, but I quickly remembered how I felt back in Chamonix. It's funny how your perspective changes so much!
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
.....yes, that feeling of feet running away from you, down the mountain, while you try and catch up. It's not unique to skiing, of course. Skateboarding, ice skating, roller skating. They're all the same, except there's no mountain involved.

It's always a great feeling when you catch up with your feet!
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