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Poster: A snowHead
Sun 7-03-21 12:24
Replies: 4
Canada has already banned cruise ships until Feb 2022. Vaccine roll-out has been slow, they are not even expecting to start vaccinating healthy under 60 year olds until July. There is also the political issues of opening international travel before opening the land border. It's possible, but I wouldn't be confident on it. Europe seems like a better bet.
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Fri 5-03-21 5:49
Replies: 32
I am interested in how all the ancillary methods of making money (food & beverage etc.) which were heavily invested in, and now sit empty, will affect the business case of ski area operation. On the flip side they will probably make a lot more in lift tickets. The duct tape set that many of us were once members of is not the one that pays the bills. We all need Mom, Dad and the kids to come and have a cheeseburger on the weekends. Was once standing in a lift line behind two woman upset about how the new fancy hotel at the resort base was bringing in rich people and it was the wrong type of clientele for that resort. Was funny for two reasons. Firstly they were both wearing £500+ arcteryx jackets with heliski logos on, so not exactly poor. Secondly it's those rich people paying through the roof that subsidise all the ski bums cheap season passes. Besides the rich tourists that can't ski are not exactly a competition for the good lines.
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Thu 4-03-21 22:10
Replies: 32
@stuarth i guess I don't have a problem with Vail targeting the super rich - seems like sensible business! Like I say I can do 3 months in BC for less than £3k. Have plenty of ski bum friends managing to scrape by and ski 100+ days per season. So I just don't buy skiing being some crazy luxury only the super rich can afford. Most of the 1 week skiers I know are limited more by time than money and I wouldn't describe them as wealthy.
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Thu 4-03-21 19:21
Replies: 32
Sorry, I'm missing the connection between the Guardian article and Vail/skiing Vail are the bad guys and responsible for everything wrong with the ski industry. Get with the program :P Like you I don't really see the link, and generally think Vail get a pretty bad rep when I think they've actually made things better for skiers as a whole. it changes the way people go skiing, less of the pick a week at one place and that's that, and more of the pick and choose where and when to go. I'm not sure how you are saying this is a bad thing? People that want to ski more get a much lower cost per day and have much more flexibility and choice. Most people would still go for a week at a time, they would maybe consider doing more weeks and maybe some extra weekends. I'm not going to criticise anything that gets skiers more time on snow!
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Thu 4-03-21 19:11
Replies: 32
Whistler accomodation has always been crazy though, too much demand and not enough beds. Even before epic it was a problem with stories in pique of people paying to rent a bathtub to sleep in! I did notice el furnies had put up their prices, used to be $5 a main course and now $8 which on the face of it seems like a huge increase, but £4.50 for pub food is probably better value than I'm getting anywhere in UK so for a ski resort still seems reasonable. I don't think anybody is going to Whistler for affordability though - if you want that plenty of better options in BC. It's kind of like me saying everything in Zermatt is too expensive - yeah of course it's Switzerland should have went somewhere else.
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Thu 4-03-21 18:24
Replies: 32
I read that when published, and thought more about the "real estate" development angle, which is key to recent ski developments at least. I think that's just the way it works in North America. Ski resorts are built primarily to sell real estate (rather than naturally developing from real villages as more common in Europe). Then you have a relationship between the two where real estate is sold to make money to upgrade ski area, which in turn creates more demand for new real estate.
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Thu 4-03-21 18:11
Replies: 32
semi-affordable (to the moderately well off at least) skiing which is now disappearing with the likes of Vail? An epic season pass that gets you unlimited skiing at Vail (and a bunch more resorts) is £717. Much cheaper than some of the big European resorts and you get access to many more places. If anything Vail has made skiing cheaper to those serious skiers looking to do plenty of days (not hard as Breck and Whistler are open over 5 months most seasons). For those just looking for a few cheap days skiing of course Vail doesn't make sense - there are much cheaper options to be had close by though. Loveland full price day ticket is about £65 but there are deals available, which can bring down the cost. I am amazed by how much some people on here spend on ski trips. While it's certainly not a cheap sport, it doesn't have to be as expensive as some make out. I can do a 3 month trip to British Columbia from UK including everything (flights, accomodation, lift, pass, food, insurance, transfers etc.) for under £3k (extra months would be about£400 each). Not cheap, but not out the reach of normal people either. If you really want to ski you an make it happen, if you are more interested in nice restaurants and luxury accommodation it will cost a lot more.
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Thu 4-03-21 16:34
Replies: 67
It depends what type of sightseeing you want. In general I think a lot of the hubs (Denver, SLC etc.), while completely pleasant, are also not particularly interesting for tourists - even Vancouver is a bit meh especially in winter when it can be very wet and grey. If you are looking for nice cities (museums, history, culture, food etc.) and cruisy skiing EU has NA beat. If by sightseeing you mean more outdoor landscape and national park kind of things then n America. My first suggestion would be to fly via NYC which is a fantastic city and worth a few days stopover for sightseeing. From there fly out west (skiing is just not reliable enough east). With 3 or 4 weeks rental car and a road trip style holiday probably makes sense. Some kind of Tahoe - California - las Vegas trip is the thing that springs to mind most. You probably need to provide a lot more info though to get some good suggestions. It really depends what kind of sightseeing you want.
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Wed 3-03-21 14:40
Replies: 67
Suggests you were getting very lucky to have that many 12 inch days each season. I'd agree. I've done 2 seasons at kicking horse and had less than 30 powder days total. I'd say around 10 per season is normal ime, which correlates pretty well with the bestsnow numbers. I mean you can find boot deep areas days after a storm, particularly if openings of areas are staggered and you know where to look - but I wouldn't call that a powder day.
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Wed 3-03-21 13:31
Replies: 23
We enjoy a bit of touring If you end up flying in and out of Calgary you will most likely drive through Kootenay pass on the way to or from red which is definitely worth a day. https://www.backcountryskiingcanada.com/KOOTENAY_PASS
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Wed 3-03-21 8:52
Replies: 23
Yes perhaps I was being a little harsh, they didn't hate those places, it was more just an "Ok for a day or two if you're passing through but not worth travelling to". Still they'd be near the bottom of my list of places in BC to snowboard, more because there are other places that are really excellent as opposed to ok/good.
And they're a friendly bunch.
Wed 3-03-21 1:31
Replies: 23
Yeah I flew into castlegar eventually, took a few days. It's a nice adventure if you have time, but with only 2 weeks it's too risky. The Kelowna - revy - whitewater - red - Kelowna is a pretty good option. I definitely think less is more when it comes to resorts, but know a lot of people like to fit in as many as possible. I kind of forget about Kelowna as I just think of it for silver star and big white neither of which people I know visited had much good to say about. didn't really rate kicking horse It's actually my favourite, but I can understand why it's not for everyone. This is why OP could really do with providing a bit more info what they are looking for. What works for one person doesn't work as well for another.
You know it makes sense.
Wed 3-03-21 0:30
Replies: 23
Red isn't ideal for roadtrips imo as it's a bit out the way, but I'm not a fan of long drives. If you can somehow sell the vouchers it might make things easier. Castlegar is the closest airport but don't even consider flying into there as too many flights get cancelled ("cancelgar"). Spokane is the closest reasonable airport - but again maybe not best for a road trip as you would have to come back on yourself. From Calgary you have the powder highway, which you can make some nice loops from. Vancouver is just way too far with nothing worthwhile to ski on the way to red. I'm of the opinion that trying to ski lots of different places and doing 1 or 2 days in each is not optimal for good skiing. The first day at any new place is kind of wasted working out the lay of the land. So I would favour 3, or at a push 4 resorts over 2 weeks. In your position I'd probably do Calgary - fernie - red - revelstoke and/or kicking horse - Calgary. But my interests may be very different to yours. Banff resorts (sunshine and lake Louise), Kimberley, panorama, whitewater are all other options. If you tour you should definitely do a day at Rogers pass (between kicking horse and revelstoke) which is arguably the top touring area in BC. If you don't tour but fancy it you can get a guide and rent gear at either golden or revelstoke. You can't go too far wrong nowhere is terrible. Depending on what you are looking for some places are definitely better than others though.
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Tue 2-03-21 18:21
Replies: 67
I honestly can't tell the difference between 18cm and 20cm's. I don't think anyone is saying 20cm is significantly better (or even noticeably different) to 18cm. There are a big number of variables in play, I'm sure we've all had days where the actual snow depth does not directly correlate with how it feels ("this 10cm is skiing like 25 with all the wind transfer". There just has to be some simple arbitrary cut off number to simplify things. But the usual safe options for touring get tracked out really, really quick these days. Guess it depends where you are. My friends in Canada are reporting Rogers pass, kicking horse slack, and ice fields parkway are same as normal (I.e. plenty of fresh lines, at worst you are going to be riding through a couple of tracks but nothimg resembling tracked out or moguls). I suspect in Europe where lifts aren't spinning there is a big increase in tourers.
Poster: A snowHead
Tue 2-03-21 15:39
Replies: 67
experience of skiing Colorado and Utah (25 - 30 days in January of various years) has been virtually no fresh snow at all. I always had the impression Colorado didn't get many big dumps, it was the combination of lots of small accumulations and cold temps that kept the snow good. In the last 5 januarys Alta has only recorded 4 20cm+ days, and 3 of them were in 2019. I was surprised at that, I guess the Utah ski board is doing a good job with their advertising. Just goes to show that powder days are pretty rare. Perhaps our expectations are too high.
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Tue 2-03-21 15:26
Replies: 67
@bergmeister I suspect their threshold for what was a powder day was fairly low. There's just not as many powder days as people think. Whistler probably gets more snow than anywhere else in Canada and number of 20cm+ days per season: 20/21 - 7 (so far) 19/20 - 11 18/19 -15 17/18 - 9 Most years the resort is open about 150 days, so somewhere between 5-10% of days are powder days, which sounds about right to me. So sweaman is doing pretty well getting 3 powder days per season while working full time. This is all resort skiing though. Once you get touring, even just in resort slack country it's pretty much unlimited powder.
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Tue 2-03-21 13:07
Replies: 8
$1300 for six days in Vail; or 500E for the season in the Grand Massif? Mmm, let me think... Nobody is really paying that for Vail. Epic local pass was 630 euros and would have got you unlimited skiing at a bunch of resorts in Colorado and 10 days at Vail. You've picked the worst possible rate for Vail and the best one for grand massif (the full price season pass is actually 1000euros). The epic local pass - and even the full pass which gets you unlimited skiing at Vail and access to even more resorts is cheaper than many of the bigger European resorts season pass (in some cases around 40% cheaper!). For those skiing lots of days n American passes generally work out pretty good value. It's the people skiing a few days a year that get ripped off with high day rates. It's just a different model though - personally I'd rather have the N American model which rewards people for doing more days. Anyway its apples to oranges because the ski experience is different in both places. For some paying a bit more for one or the other is justifiable as it provides a better experience.
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Mon 1-03-21 0:59
Replies: 67
The pro-skier argument isn't really valid. If you live in Whistler for the winter (and once upon a time I did), you are not that bothered about skiing with the weekend crowds, as it is usually _much_ quieter in the week. Im coming from the point of view this forum I predominantly British so people will be going for 1-2 weeks as opposed to a weekend. If you are just going for weekend it could be awful - but that's true anywhere. With a week or 2 it usually averages out a bit. If it was 100% gong show pro skiers would not be moving there though.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Mon 1-03-21 0:45
Replies: 3
Plenty of people predicted it. Large numbers of new tourers entering the country with questionable knowledge and experience was likely to cause some excess deaths. It looks like 19 skiers/snowboarders have died this year, which actually is lower than what I might have expected. The issue is not a healthy young skier catching covid. The issue is them spreading it to more vulnerable people. when for most people, especially those involved in mountain sports, there are an infinite number of hazards that have a much higher chance of causing death than corona. Yes and then the injured people put search and rescue and medical professionals at risk and take up hospital beds that may be in short supply. age...ironically, U.K. style lockdown increases the susceptibility to covid illness Not really. While gyms and pools have been closed there's been nothing to stop you exercising either at home or running/cycling outdoors. I know plenty of people that are working less (furlough, or just saving commuting time as working at home) and spending more time exercising than normal. I don't see why UK lockdown has any effect on diet - in fact not being in an office and having to grab fast food for lunch and less eating out is probably improved diets if anything. Of course it's a convenient excuse for some that lockdown is the cause of their problems.
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Sun 28-02-21 17:29
Replies: 133
I’ve always wanted to go to Canada. What’s the skiing like at Easter? Banff is probably your best option. I've not personally been there that late, but I'm sure you can find some info. To go back to Canada discussion talking with my friend's in BC today and they are not at all convinced BC will meet their proposal of getting everyone vaccinated by September. Of course a long way away so we will see what happens. Regarding herd immunity don't we also need to take into account the millions that have already have covid and most likely already have some kind of immunity? Also I'm not sure herd immunity matters, if those unvaccinated are young healthy people do we need to be overly concerned?
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Sun 28-02-21 17:22
Replies: 67
What's your definition of "proper powder day"? The million dollar question! There's a huge range of what people consider to be a powder day. For me proper powder has to be bottomless, I usually find 20cm+ is enough but can vary depending on other things (wind, time since last snowfall etc.). Japan is about the most reliable place for powder days, but even there it is not guaranteed. In a season in British Columbia I usually get about 5-10 per season - they are much rather than people think. Of course if you are willing to tour you can have pretty much unlimited powder days, but assume we are just talking about resorts.
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Sun 28-02-21 14:30
Replies: 14
you get a lot less time actually skiing downhill no poo sherlock Yes it's obvious but a big factor for the masses of people who are time limited.
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Sun 28-02-21 3:28
Replies: 133
Conflicting info coming from Alberta https://www.alberta.ca/covid19-vaccine.aspx I am also hopeful, we will just have to wait and see. Besides who skis in Alberta (this a joke) Some people even ski out east :sH:
And post your own questions...
Sun 28-02-21 2:55
Replies: 67
Several different Vancouverites staying in our hotel (it's a sociable place, the Mallard Bar) told us that the conditions we experienced are common, and that the Epic Pass has seriously worsened overcrowding. I have a couple of friends that live in Whistler and they said the epic pass has increased overall numbers in the village, but most of them are "tourists" rather than "skiers", so all the good stuff gets far less tracked out and most of them are just skiing half days. I have not been since they moved to epic pass so I can't gives personal opinion on it. So Whistler can be incredible - but you have to be honest about its downsides Biggest downside is price of accomodation, which is the main reason I haven't been back! My opinion is you got really unlucky. I've done over 100 days there and only had one really bad day like you describe. Also the fact I've spent a lot of days there probably helps, I know what times to hit certain lifts and can take more educated gambles on when/if a chair will open and plan accordingly. If it was that bad you wouldn't see so many pro skiers choosing to live there! Fwiw I've had nightmare days at a few other resorts, weather is a fickle thing. Also been in resorts on big holidays where queues were awful. I just don't believe the risk is really any higher at Whistler than most other places.
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Sun 28-02-21 2:33
Replies: 14
Ime the drop out rate for new tourers was pretty high before covid. I suspect we can see an even higher drop out rate once lifts reopen. I think touring is always going to be pretty niche. Physically it's more demanding, there's a lot more faff, and you get a lot less time actually skiing downhill.
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Sun 28-02-21 2:19
Replies: 133
Canada is committed to vaccinating everyone who wants it by September. After that they're going to want as many tourists as they can get! I don't think that is true for the whole of Canada. BC seems to be aiming for everyone by September, Alberta doesn't plan to even start vaccinating those under 50 till the end of September. Also there are political reasons Canada might not open for international tourism before they can open the us border - which of course is dependent on the situation in USA. Canada has already banned cruise ships for the whole of 2021. I'd say it's still to early to say for sure what will happen. I'm more confident in Europe ski season happening than Canada though.
You know it makes sense.
Thu 25-02-21 6:18
Replies: 67
I've had 1-2 days of no skiing each time I've been there and seen queues of well over an hour for lifts I've done over 100 days at Whistler and never had a day where skiing was not possible! I've only ever seen waits getting up to 45mins once - huge dump, bluebird, and they didn't get many lifts open because avy danger was too high. You are either exaggerating a lot or incredibly unlucky. The best ski trip I've ever had in North America was to Fernie Another good choice for a first timer. While I don't rate is as high as some other places it has a nice mix of terrain and gets plenty of snow. Know a lot of Brits that love it. Perhaps you just got lucky at fernie but ime they struggle way more than Whistler in getting terrain open - Currie headwall and all the good stuff off polar peak are predominantly closed and after storms it takes a really long time to get avy control done (not their fault, just the way it is with the terrain there).
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Tue 23-02-21 11:25
Replies: 47
@jonathon_bell thanks,but I'm well aware what confirmation bias is. How about some actual criticism of the studies or perhaps showing some research that contradicts? Assuming any scientific study used as evidence is just confirmation bias is quite a slippery slope! Especially when the research I'm quoting is from particularly well respected journals. what about ice and NSAID after exercise Some studies show that reducing inflammation following exercise decreases adaptations to exercise. This one found that ibuprofen completely removed the effects of exercise on muscle protein synthesis! https://journals.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/ajpendo.00352.2001 Others found no significant differences. An animal study concluded ibuprofen administration during endurance training cancels running-distance-dependent adaptations in skeletal muscle. This suggests that even if ibuprofen administration facilitates longer-distance running, no further effects of training on skeletal muscle can be expected. So there seems to be zero positive support for ibuprofen, at best it makes no difference. fast bowlers & tennis players think so! Different goals. They are not looking for training effect or long term recovery. They want to minimise inflammation as much as possible so they can perform at highest level the next day. You see it a lot in pro level sport - performance is more important than health. The British journal of sports medicine sum it up best: "The various phases of inflammation help repair damaged soft tissues. Thus, inhibiting inflammation using medications may negatively affect long-term tissue healing, especially when higher dosages are used. Standard of care for soft-tissue injuries should not include anti-inflammatory medications. We also question the use of cryotherapy. Despite widespread use among clinicians and the population, there is no high-quality evidence on the efficacy of ice for treating soft-tissue injuries. Even if mostly analgesic, ice could potentially disrupt inflammation, angiogenesis and revascularisation, delay neutrophil and macrophage infiltration as well as increase immature myofibres. This may lead to impaired tissue repair and redundant collagen synthesis."
Poster: A snowHead
Mon 22-02-21 19:36
Replies: 12
We live together (just friends!), I'll take the blame as was using her laptop and forgot to sign out of my account earlier!
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Mon 22-02-21 18:58
Replies: 12
Can I suggest: « Hard core female physio looking for partners to ski rad Chamonix off piste routes. Accommodation and massages on me if you supply the 6 pack, cuisine and fine Champagne » :lol: I wouldn't consider myself hardcore and the whole point is a break from work so hopefully won't be doing too many massages!
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Mon 22-02-21 18:52
Replies: 47
Most, if not all, of the "medical professional" I've had contact with for the various injuries in the past few years advised icing. Are you suggesting all of them are out of date? The RICE concept is very outdated. The use of NSAIDs has been questioned for a long time - here is an example from the BMJ published in 1998 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1113091/. Even the creator of RICE has said ice and rest are not beneficial to recovery. This is the most up to date advice https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/54/2/72 - which you will see suggests avoiding anti-inflammatory procedures. If that is not enough to convince you icing it's outdated, I don't know what more I can do! Of course I am speaking from a general point of view. There are nuances. For example when there is huge amounts of inflammation, reducing inflammation can be beneficial - perhaps the case with your surgeries. I've personally only had one case where I felt 100% confident NSAIDs and ice was the best option (car accident, shoulder dislocation, too much inflammation to put the shoulder back in - was clear the sooner we could reduce inflammation get the shoulder back in and start rehab was the best option).
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Sat 20-02-21 18:05
Replies: 47
https://www1.racgp.org.au/newsgp/clinical/is-it-time-to-rethink-rice-for-soft-tissue-injurie#:~:text= The guy arguing for ice here actually makes a good point. Let's say you sprain your ankle and doing some kind of anti-inflammatory procedure (ice, drugs) means you can stay walking as opposed to someone that is unable to walk for numerous days due to inflammation. There is an argument to be made that it will result in a better overall outcome. Anti-inflammatory procedures definitely have their place, but I think it is more nuanced than simply icing everything all the time which can be detrimental. There are quite a lot of examples like this where something was purposed and we've just almost blindly stuck with it. Static stretching before sport is a great example where it was just accepted for years. Now research suggests it probably doesn't decrease risk of injury and likely decreases performance.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Sat 20-02-21 13:41
Replies: 47
@abc it's always going to be difficult to definitively measure. Huge issues with quantifying injury and measuring outcomes. I did my PhD in a musculoskeletal area where normal practice for quantifying rehabilitation outcome was a questionnaire, which have a whole host of problems too. Even if you don't think there is enough evidence to be convinced reducing inflammation can lead to slower healing, there seems to be even less evidence that reducing inflammation leads to quicker recovery. So the question becomes why try to reduce inflammation, where is the upside? If it's just about relieving pain there are other options that don't reduce inflammation. There should be a paper coming out of Karolinska institute soon proposing the mechanism for why nsaids decrease training effect.
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Fri 19-02-21 20:04
Replies: 47
If RICE was not effective in dealing with minor strains or sprains we would soon know about it! From a practical point of view, if you found it had no effect you would not bother doing it. The question is does it do any harm, and in most cases the answer is unlikely. How would we know? If you get a sprain and follow RICE you have zero idea if you healed any quicker than if you had just done nothing. There is little (if any) hard evidence that anti inflammatory drugs increase recovery. What they can do is reduce pain that makes us feel better but less pain/inflammation doesn't equal better recovery. On the other hand there is evidence that NSAIDs may be detrimental to healing of bones and tendons. The jury is still out on muscle injuries a few studies found NSAIDs were detrimental to healing,others found no difference. Based on the science it seems like a no brainer to avoid anything that reduces inflammation. At best you get similar healing to not reducing inflammation, at the risk of potentially decreasing healing. For pain take something like paracetamol. The question is does it do any harm, and in most cases the answer is unlikely. The bar is set very low if something is worthwhile doing just because it doesn't cause harm! The question should be does it help? Which there seems to be little evidence for. I'd say there is compelling evidence that it does cause "harm" (slower healing) in bone and tendons. While the jury is still out on muscle injuries there seems to be zero benefit and potential risk.
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Fri 19-02-21 19:27
Replies: 193
My wife hates the idea of going somewhere cold where she has to get sweaty and do a sporty activity. That's essentially skiing - especially as a beginner. I'm not trying to be mean, you seem like a nice guy with good intentions. I just can't see how it's going to work. Imagine the shoe being on the other foot and her wanting you to do a trip to do something where you hated 3 key components of that activity. Perhaps a better idea is to look at holidays where you can do a day or two skiing on the side - either summer glacier skiing or if winter maybe a city break with access to skiing for a day or two.
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Fri 19-02-21 19:15
Replies: 47
I'm just not sure local inflammation is an issue though? It's either due to injury so necessary for optimum healing. Or its due to soreness following exercise which again is necessary for optimum adaptation. The exception being when you have to perform back to back days and performance is more important than adaptation (think tour de France rider or someone doing a multi-day ski tour). As for systematic inflammation I think you hot the nail on the head when you say it is very difficult to extract which precise effects are the strongest factors Be at a healthy weight (this is the most important point), eat a healthy diet (you don't need to be an expert in nutrition to know what's generally "good" and "bad"), try to minimise stress, exercise regularly etc. It's all the normal stuff. Inflammation will take care of itself.
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Fri 19-02-21 18:30
Replies: 47
@bigtipper that is chronic systematic inflammation. I think here we are mostly talking about acute localised (i.e. injury or doms). Even then it's not clear for example this study suggested carbs wether high GI (i.e. sugar) had little effect on inflammation https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24787494/ The one thing that seems consistent is that losing weight lowers blood markers of inflammation. I'm not aware of any research that suggests acute localised inflammation is in any way bad. In fact exercise is one of the best examples of localised acute inflammation and is overwhelmingly positive.
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Fri 19-02-21 16:51
Replies: 47
Many athletes take ice baths after long endurance exercise. Athletes are only taking ice baths when absolutely necessary. I.e. a cricket fast bowler who has to play back to back days will use them so they can perform at a top level. For general training ice baths defeat the point as they decrease adaptations, the whole goal.
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Fri 19-02-21 16:46
Replies: 193
Just to even things up a bit - it's not just women. I don't think anyone is suggesting women are worse skiers than men or struggle to learn as quickly. I've been out with couples where the guy is a fairly good skier and trying to encourage a reluctant partner to push their boundaries a bit and it's always been an absolute nightmare. I don't blame the woman for this, it's completely the guys fault trying to force them into doing something they don't want. Interestingly I've seen this play out even when the woman is technically much better than their partner but just lacks confidence or is perhaps a lot more scared/risk averse. Men tend to have the opposite problem of overestimating their abilities. Funny about the equestrian example. I've worked in a hiking area where horse riding is also popular. 9 times out of 10 the female half of the couple is really excited about horse riding and the guy is kind of forced into it. My favourite was hiking past a woman and her guide on horses with big smiles on their faces to 10mins later come across a guy on her own that turns out to be her partner who is so fed up he's got off the horse and is walking it back. However in the same place it tends to be the guys that are more into hiking and kind of forcing the females to do multi day camping trips. Of course there are exceptions, but I've seen enough to feel like these generalisations are more often true. Which is why I don't envy anyone in the situation of op!
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Fri 19-02-21 16:20
Replies: 47
It reduces inflammation. What you need to ask if that's a good thing or not. There is more research coming out that taking anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. ibuprofen) actually slows healing. Inflammation is a key signal to the body to adapt/recover. I think ibuprofen blunting the adaptations of exercise on muscles is going to be a hot topic in sports science over the next few years. My personal opinion now is to only take anti-inflammatory drugs or ice in two situations: - extreme pain - repeated efforts (i.e. if I was doing some hut to hut traverse and was sore following day 1 but needed to complete the trip).
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