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My current worst skiing flaw

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
I have no telepathic skills, so will only make my mind up on what was the intention after the passing event. The scale goes from "polite intentions but unnecessary" at one end, to "impatient idiot that wants to force me to give up my right of way on a narrow piste because he can't control speed to match the flow, and is probably so fat he'll probably have a coronary if he has to start poling afterwards" at the other end of the scale.

My hearing is substandard on one side, so feel free to click away, but if your intention of clicking is to indicate which side you intend to pass, then please do it on my best side.


Now if someone can invent a pole clicking / bicycle bell ringing equivalent that causes iPod music to be overridden, then I'd be happy Smile
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
I tend, in the language of the country I'm in, to say on which side I'm about to pass. I kinda feel that if people don't even know the words for left and right of the country they're skiing in, that's tough. At least that should be relatively clear, a pole click is open to too many interpretations.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Pedantica, I hope you do not ski in Meribel, as 90% of people would only understand left/right for left and right.
Saying it in French would be of no use to them.
Better off using fluent south London. Smile

Smiley denotes Meribel users not you.
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Filthyphil30k, good point, well argued. Laughing
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
I often whistle tunelessly when passing.
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You'll need to Register first of course.
Sofia, to answer the original question, what I do is slow down, wait until the individual executes a turn and then dive directly at them so when I arrive at where they were, they have moved on. If they very suddenly change direction and I have room then I reverse direction to pass them on the side they have just turned away form. Usually works. The other trick is to bomb in a straight line down the side of the piste. Although I adopt that tactic sometimes, to my mind this has a flaw in that if you are on the side of a drop off it does not leave you many options if someone decides to ski on to the same line without looking up slope.

I find the above to be better than giving loads of room becasue experience tells me if I do, some other nerk will then try to claim the space meaning there will be less room than if I just ski as described. It's a damage limitation exercise. I skiied through a gate in front of a lift without stopping recently - only one couple was waiting - and the woman in the couple jumped a mile and started to glare at me. Now, I grant you I may have scared her, but if she's going to get scared in a lift queue, what hope do I have on a slope? Better to ensure one of you is knowingly safe and clear rather than to give a wide berth to someone who might react if they know you are there and possibly cause other problems.

foxtrotzulu, having only just found out about the clicking thing I would say that it lacks a little clarity as a signal. There's a bunch of kit contacts that occurs when learners are on the slope, any amount of which could lead to clicking so, on reflection, I think it's a signal that has a high percentage of possible confusion. Also it seems to me that it's the gloved equivalent to snapping ones fingers to get attention which never goes down well. I shall not be adopting the practice.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Well, glad to have learned something from a thread. In future, instead of politely clicking my poles to let people know I'm there, I will use them to push the skier in front out of the way jousting style. I'll probably change to a more metallic, full-face helmet and more interesting body armour at the same time. Anyone got a cod piece I could borrow?
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
wow, nicker-twisting pole-clicking discussion! i do it very occasionally on 'transport tracks' and that's the only place i've ever encountered it. probably due to the nature of them - they're long and boring and if you've spent 100s of metres building up relative speed on a gradient of 1/100, you'd rather not lose it. strangely enough, i've never seen a catastrophic crash as a result. i use it as a courtesy, not to announce that i'm about to blast past because nobody blasts anywhere on transport tracks. if someone did it to me on a proper piste, i'd have a word but a transport track is a very different situation.
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
tiffin wrote:
I often whistle tunelessly when passing.


So it's you in that cubicle at work!!
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
I agree with foxtrtotzulu on the pole clicking, it is good to know someone is there before they pass you. I give a few taps to my poles as I approach a slower skier, I give them a wide space but sometimes with beginners they don't turn when you expect them, so just so they know you are there and won't turn in your path. It isn't needed on wider steep runs where you can just avoid them .
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
@biddpyat, you do know this thread is over 4 years old?
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@Rabbie, I suspect it's as relevant now as it was then Madeye-Smiley
Personally I prefer to have any sort of indication that someone is behind and considering passing or is about to. I don't really care about whether they are correct or incorrect, as long as I can take into account that I am no longer the sole occupant of this ski corridor.
On the BB last year, the blue track returning to the hotel was quite crowded and as someone nudged me I took very slight evasive action which was sufficient to allow him to pass on the outside of the track. I couldn't work out what he was up to as he skied on - arms outstretched forwards, he then went into another skier ahead in such a way that I thought it was someone he knew - but no, he was simply out of control, in a very weird way!
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
This is an interesting thread. As a relative beginner who is going on his first skiing holiday on the Birthday Bash, I’ve never heard of clicking poles as a form of warning. With poor hearing in one ear and tinitus in both, the chances of me hearing clicking poles whilst wearing a helmet would be practically zero. As for me clicking my poles to warn others; I’d more than likely loose my balance and end up on my aris.

I thought the rule was; it is the responsibility of the person approaching from behind to avoid the person lower down the slope with their back to them. But it sounds as if this is not always possible or that simple

Hopefully my first skiing holiday will be incident free. Very Happy
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
I recommend skiing off piste. Less people.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
a.j. wrote:
clicking on cattracks is very common and has been for as long as I've been skiing - i appreciate it as a warning myself, and do it from time to time, where the closing speeds are so slow you are going to be alongside each other for a while. I would never do it on a normal run, but on cattracks I don't think it's practical for us all to wait for the normal amount of space to open up, instead you have to assume everyone will continue to straightline and knowing who is where is handy.

I am aware it always causes a snowheads civil war though *fetches popcorn* maybe someone should make a poll snowHead


It is not only practical, but a requirement that you wait for the "normal" amount of space to open up before you overtake another slope user. I really dislike this attitude that maintaining a higher speed than others is more important than anything else, including the safety of other slope users. Please read and understand the FIS code - you are required to allow for any voluntary or in-volantary movement by a downhill skier (i.e. you must make allowance for them to do the unexpected), and should never, under any circumstances, assume everyone will continue to "straightline". Kids in particular can be unpredictable and I can't count the number of times I have seen one suffer a fall due to this sort of irresponsible and inconsiderate attitude. In my experience, the skier who caused the issue simply carries on skiing, often not aware that they have caused a fall. Reading your post, it is very likely you fall into that category.
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Quote:

I thought the rule was; it is the responsibility of the person approaching from behind to avoid the person lower down the slope with their back to them. But it sounds as if this is not always possible or that simple


No it is that simple.
If they lack the space or skill to safely pass then they have to wait.
Pole clicking etc is superfluous as the skier in front should have to take no account of the skier behind.
Personally, if I am skiing slowly on a narrow piste I will stay in a narrow corridor towards one side of the piste but I am under no obligation to do that.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
The advice to pass as the skier is turning away from you is correct IMO. If they are straight lining it's clearly not an issue. In certain situations, quite narrow, steep dropoff one side, snowplough behind until safe.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
There are also the times when on a narrow trail, that tends to flatten out or worse go uphill and you have got your schuss in control, but there are two buddies having a chat side by side in their snow plough and if you slow down then you have to pole up behind them, when a little please leave a piece of piste for those who don't want to have to pole because you two want to natter..... Twisted Evil . A pole click is far more polite that yelling at them to cop the f on. ( sorry but I met a few like this last week. )
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what is wrong with "excuse me" or "excuse moi" etc?
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
When you pass boarders, try to pass them on their front side not their blind side - they way they might see you.

As boarders have no poles to click, the normal way of alerting people in front of your presence is to make loud scraping sounds with the edges of your board as close as possible to the skiers back. If you can do this with an increasing cadence and volume it lets them know you're serious.
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WindOfChange wrote:
When you pass boarders, try to pass them on their front side not their blind side - they way they might see you.

As boarders have no poles to click, the normal way of alerting people in front of your presence is to make loud scraping sounds with the edges of your board as close as possible to the skiers back. If you can do this with an increasing cadence and volume it lets them know you're serious.


How do they manage that when they're sitting in the middle of piste?? Puzzled

Toofy Grin
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