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New EU law changes chalet host lifestyle forever

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
After two pages, this situation as I see it is falling into one of two camps

1. It's wrong / unethical for chalet staff to work for well below minimum wage. That's changing. Hoorah!

The increase in wages will improve the product offered by the TO and the service offered by the chalet staff.


2. If you took the time to work out the hourly rate for a chalet staff worker you'd see that it's well below minimum wage.

But for former /current chalet staff workers the work and its remuneration isn't as simplistic a proposition as money in, money out.

The TO organises the job, training, uniform, transport to and from the job (and for some companies in-resort transport), accommodation, food & drink, ski pass, ski equipment, excursions to other resorts, plus cash money for delivering the chalet experience to the TO's customers

Additional benefits may include tips from customers, reduced/free food & drink in-resort from local establishments for recommending their establishment to the T0's guests and/or accompanying them

When all the factors which constitute the TO remuneration package are weighed up the chalet staff worker can decide if it's an equitable relationship for both parties.

In addition, after working for a period of time if the chalet staff worker feels that they are being unfairly treated they can leave the job with the only penalty the cost to return to their home address.

For a large percentage of chalet staff workers the hourly wage is not a factor as they have parental support and are taking the job as a stop gap between university and a career. Much like unpaid internships and poorly paid but lucrative positions in media.

Then there are pretty much the rest who may or may not have skied before taking the chalet staff job who recognise that they have neither the expertise nor cash flow to secure a similar work package independently.

What remains to be seen is whether the TO can offer the chalet product, and if so can they offer it at a price which is realistic for the existing British customer, their expectations, and their wallet?

----------

As an aside, the argument that it's not fair to local businesses doesn't take into consideration that many local businesses own the property, sleep above the 'shop', and employ family members.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
So family members shouldn't be paid?
Sleeping in provided accommodation is wrong?
All the properties are mortgage free?

Uniform - has to be legally provided at no cost.
Skipass is a bonus.
Ski equipment is a bonus.
Excursions to other resorts is a bonus.

These things are dangling carrots.
Take them away and what are you left with?
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Maybe the British Chalet model should look to how the Dutch operate in their Chalets.

All the staff are on 35-40 hour week, days off, taxes insurance etc according to EU law. i.e Normal Working Conditions i.e No Sweatshops

They still offer a great deal.

https://www.skichalets.nl/
https://www.wenschalets.nl/ (wish chalets)

British Chalets to get around the Freedom of Movement could employ English Speaking European Staff from Scandinavia, Holland etc
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flangesax wrote:
So family members shouldn't be paid?


Of course they should. And are. And that payment for many takes into consideration accommodation, bills, food etc


Quote:
Sleeping in provided accommodation is wrong?


No


Quote:
All the properties are mortgage free?


No, but some are. Have been in the family for generations and the younger family members are working to maintain a business that the hope one day will be theirs.


Quote:
Uniform - has to be legally provided at no cost.


Fair enough

Quote:
Skipass is a bonus.
Ski equipment is a bonus.
Excursions to other resorts is a bonus.

These things are dangling carrots.
Take them away and what are you left with?


These may have zero cost to the TO but they certainly don't have zero cost & value to the worker. And once again cash flow for seasonal workers is critical.
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Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
What some refuse to see is that the market sets its own rates and the only people being exploited, are those that are forced to work as seasonaires... which is no one.

The other factor is that a sudden increase in cost from this will not increase the quality of the service provided, one bit. The people doing the jobs will be the same demographic, with the same skills (or lack of) and they will be there for the same reason... to ski and party as much as they can, all winter.

The only change from this will be that less customers buy ski holidays and less people have the chance of working a season.
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flangesax wrote:

A 35hr week is an impossibility.



where do you get this "35 hour week" idea from?
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bar shaker wrote:
What some refuse to see is that the market sets its own rates and the only people being exploited, are those that are forced to work as seasonaires... which is no one.

The other factor is that a sudden increase in cost from this will not increase the quality of the service provided, one bit. The people doing the jobs will be the same demographic, with the same skills (or lack of) and they will be there for the same reason... to ski and party as much as they can, all winter.

The only change from this will be that less customers buy ski holidays and less people have the chance of working a season.


Hear hear
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Having been a seasonal ski worker - in many guises - for over 15 years, the more exploitative (is it even a word?) scenario would be for a seasonal worker to have to get enough money together to pay for the minimums prior to leaving for resort:

Travel to resort
Accommodation - 1 month bond, 1 month in advance
Ski Pass
Food

on a minimum wage, zero hours contract before they have received their first weekly / monthly pay cheque and in a situation where they could be let go at any stage during the season by the TO if the demand for holidays is low.
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What happens at the moment if a seasonaire say breaks a leg? Do they receive any money when they are not working? Are they sent back to the U.K.?
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The main points of the new (current) rules;

- Seasonal workers must be paid at least the minimum wage for the sector (currently €9.88 an hour)
- Travel to the job, accommodation and food (including on days off) must be provided on top on the wage
- Additional benefits (eg lift pass, equipment hire, insurance, discounts on drinks) may be deducted from the minimum wage but only if clearly stated in the contract of employment.
- Any deductions made must be actual costs with supporting evidence and listed on the payslip
- Staff accommodation must meet strict minimum requirements
- UK chalet firms posting seasonal staff must carry out their substantial activities (have their registered offices, pay their taxes etc) in the UK and not France and have documentary proof
Documentation, including employment contracts, payslips, timesheets, health and safety risk assessments - translated into French - must be available on site if required by inspectors
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Sorry to repeat myself but the exploited will often not recognise themselves as being exploited so I think that argument is moot. Seasonaire's will say they chose to do it and enjoyed the opportunity and experience. This does not mean that their employer has not exploited weaknesses in employment legislation and therefore them. Nor that skiing punters have not exploited those weaknesses to garner cheaper skiing holidays. I see the argument that "everyone's a winner" but simply don't believe it. I guess it's a similar debate to zero hours contracts where many of the workers say they like the arrangement but it smacks of poor labour practice.
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And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Most of the people on here decrying the UK ski TO's chalet/chalet hotel model, seem to me to be looking in from the outside. IE they have never actually experienced a ski season as a worker. There are some ex seasonaires who have commented that it is not exploitation and I would agree. I have now done 13 winter seasons. 11 in Europe,1 in US & 1 Canada. I do it for 1 very good reason. I get to ski for 5 months 3-5 days a week at someone else's expense! I did miss 1 season 2 years ago and the 5 ski trips I took cost a great deal of my money, far better to have someone else pay me to be out there. I once worked out that if you take in to account all the parts of the remuneration package, even the lowest paid staff were in receipt of approx. 440-600 a week, depending on job role. The biggest expense is accommodation. Yes I know some of you will scream, it's lousy but it's no worse that many student accommodations, and quite frankly most of the junior staff do not treat it with respect no matter how good it is. Very few 18-25 year olds would get that at ANY job in the UK. I get paid in cash what I would have considered a pittance 20 years ago, but it's not all about the cash. I agree poor service can be a problem, but it's not due to poor overall remuneration. It is due to poor training, supervision and/or management. Also I have to say it. A lot of youngsters do lack the kind of common sense that was once prevalent. Too many have a I want it my way attitude. Again it's up to management to manage that, but it isn't easy. Some changes are coming certainly. I just hope it will not see the demise of UK ski TO's completely.
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Layne wrote:
Sorry to repeat myself but the exploited will often not recognise themselves as being exploited so I think that argument is moot. Seasonaire's will say they chose to do it and enjoyed the opportunity and experience. This does not mean that their employer has not exploited weaknesses in employment legislation and therefore them.


Surely this is the case with every job regardless of wage.

An employer is employing an employee for profit.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
marcellus wrote:
The main points of the new (current) rules;

- Seasonal workers must be paid at least the minimum wage for the sector (currently €9.88 an hour)
- Travel to the job, accommodation and food (including on days off) must be provided on top on the wage
- Additional benefits (eg lift pass, equipment hire, insurance, discounts on drinks) may be deducted from the minimum wage but only if clearly stated in the contract of employment.
- Any deductions made must be actual costs with supporting evidence and listed on the payslip
- Staff accommodation must meet strict minimum requirements
- UK chalet firms posting seasonal staff must carry out their substantial activities (have their registered offices, pay their taxes etc) in the UK and not France and have documentary proof
Documentation, including employment contracts, payslips, timesheets, health and safety risk assessments - translated into French - must be available on site if required by inspectors


If only this had been the first post, not one of the last.

With careful organisation this could have minimal to zero impact / change for the TO, the employee and the customer.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Alpinebear wrote:
What happens at the moment if a seasonaire say breaks a leg? Do they receive any money when they are not working? Are they sent back to the U.K.?


I guess it depends on the wording of the employment contract.

If the employee was injured during the course of their job then they would be covered under statutory sick pay.

If the employee was injured in their free time then who knows?
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 Poster: A snowHead
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Mike Pow wrote:
Layne wrote:
Sorry to repeat myself but the exploited will often not recognise themselves as being exploited so I think that argument is moot. Seasonaire's will say they chose to do it and enjoyed the opportunity and experience. This does not mean that their employer has not exploited weaknesses in employment legislation and therefore them.


Surely this is the case with every job regardless of wage.

An employer is employing an employee for profit.

Employers quite naturally can not always be trusted to ensure that they treat employees fairly. And neither ironically can employees be trusted to only accept fair employment. That is why we have we employment legislation. Exploitation can occur when the legislation is weak or incomplete, when new developments in employment occur or when society changes it's view on what is acceptable.

I am not saying in this case whether the employment law changes are justified. Just because those who've been employed under the current rules don't believe it's necessary doesn't mean it isn't.
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marcellus wrote:
The main points of the new (current) rules;

- Seasonal workers must be paid at least the minimum wage for the sector (currently €9.88 an hour)
- Travel to the job, accommodation and food (including on days off) must be provided on top on the wage
- Additional benefits (eg lift pass, equipment hire, insurance, discounts on drinks) may be deducted from the minimum wage but only if clearly stated in the contract of employment.
- Any deductions made must be actual costs with supporting evidence and listed on the payslip
- Staff accommodation must meet strict minimum requirements
- UK chalet firms posting seasonal staff must carry out their substantial activities (have their registered offices, pay their taxes etc) in the UK and not France and have documentary proof
Documentation, including employment contracts, payslips, timesheets, health and safety risk assessments - translated into French - must be available on site if required by inspectors


All seems eminently reasonable, except:

- Travel to the job, accommodation and food (including on days off) must be provided on top on the wage

Why should an employer provide travel to and from a fixed place of work, nor accommodation (foc) unless there are no local alternatives, and obliged to provide free food on a day off is just (imo) ridiculous. Nothing to stop an employer providing any of those things foc, but to oblige them to, surely this means that seasonal worker will enjoy greater benefits then many other types of employees who have to provide those things from their own post tax incomes.
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dp wrote:
I can see the logic in this post but I don't agree with all of it.

midgetbiker wrote:

£250 left, lets say the operator charges £100 for accommodation and utilities (you pay iro that in most major UK cities for a student room bills in, resort accom is generally dearer in season but you won't get your own room most likely so hence still about £100).


I don't really agree with this principle. I am largely against the notion that company-provided accommodation has the equivalent cash value to what you would rent, basically because if you were given the cash to choose your own place you could have whatever you wanted and spend as much as you like. When it's provided, it's done for the employer's convenience as much as yours, and you get less freedom on choosing where and with whom. So whilst your employer's provision might be saving you £100 in cash, it doesn't necessarily mean that it's a rightful and exact substitute to £100 in cash.


I did stress that no one taking the job should be obliged to take the accommodation. Which should negate your concerns. But in essence on this one (probably due to different work/life experiences) I think we'll have to agree to differ.


Last edited by Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see? on Wed 13-06-18 12:12; edited 1 time in total
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dp wrote:

35 hour week as chalet staff is clearly impossible. It's a 7-day week unless you've got some drastic idea about chalets doing self catering weekends or something - so that permits 5 hours a day. The process of prepping, cooking and serving an evening meal - when it's a 3 course meal with wine - and cleaning after; plainly can't be done in much less than 5 hours in it's own right, unless you're going to do meals which are largely ready to cook - which chalets clearly don't. So by my estimation, you'd hit the 35 hour mark before any breakfast was served and before changeover day got the chalet ready for the next set of guests.


It's not impossible at all, you just need more staff to cover the hours. Just because a business runs 7 days a week doesn't mean those working for it need to do 7 days, otherwise most of us would be doing that. Policing for example is a 24 hr, 7 day a week operation, that doesn't mean police officers work 168 hours per week.

Which is why we are basically agreeing (despite appearances to the contrary) that any business employing one person and paying them at a level reasonable for 35-40 hours but then getting them to do 70 hours is definitely exploiting them
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dp wrote:
... 35 hour week as chalet staff is clearly impossible. It's a 7-day week unless you've got some drastic idea about chalets doing self catering weekends or something - so that permits 5 hours a day. The process of prepping, cooking and serving an evening meal - when it's a 3 course meal with wine - and cleaning after; plainly can't be done in much less than 5 hours in it's own right, unless you're going to do meals which are largely ready to cook - which chalets clearly don't. So by my estimation, you'd hit the 35 hour mark before any breakfast was served and before changeover day got the chalet ready for the next set of guests.

Not sure when you last stayed in a catered chalet, but this isn't anywhere near my experience of the hours chalet staff actually work. For some years, once they have got into the swing of things after the initial weeks, it has been more like 07:30-09:30 and 18:30-21:00 on 5 days, plus a long changeover day of say 15 hours, and one day off. Even that only totals 37.5 hours. And from this season most TOs, at least in France, are giving staff an extra day off, reducing this to 32 hours in practice. Giving 3 hours to cover some flexibility on deliveries, changeover etc and still fit within a 35-hour week. It clearly isn't "impossible".
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midgetbiker wrote:

It's not impossible at all, you just need more staff to cover the hours. Just because a business runs 7 days a week doesn't mean those working for it need to do 7 days, otherwise most of us would be doing that. Policing for example is a 24 hr, 7 day a week operation, that doesn't mean police officers work 168 hours per week.

Which is why we are basically agreeing (despite appearances to the contrary) that any business employing one person and paying them at a level reasonable for 35-40 hours but then getting them to do 70 hours is definitely exploiting them


I didn't think there was any appearance that we were disagreeing.

Sorry I discounted the possibility of employing 2 people to do the work because of the principle that if a business employs 2 people at EUR100 each for 35 hours a week, then the cumulative cost is EUR200 a week, plus 2 beds plus 4 meals a day. Whereas even if they paid somebody less-rubbish money to work a 70 hour week, it'd only cost them EUR200 plus 1 bed plus 2 meals. So it's evident that from a short-sighted mindset, it's cheaper to pay one person alright money for long hours than it is to pay 2 people alright money for sensible hours.

I say short-sighted because it is clearly better having the extra person, and having people who're more switched on and energetic because they're not absolutely exhausted. But all the same, you see my point.

That's generally the ship logic. Cruise ships have an economy of cabins because there's only a finite space on the ship, and they'll only put senior offices in cabins above deck because those cabins would typically be sold to the public; so they'll pay people more money to work very long hours because they're not struggling for cash to pay people with, they're struggling for space to put them. My feeling is thus that even if chalet companies were going to pay more money, they'd just pay people more money to work longer hours, because doing so doesn't take up extra accommodation.
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ecureuil wrote:

Not sure when you last stayed in a catered chalet, but this isn't anywhere near my experience of the hours chalet staff actually work. For some years, once they have got into the swing of things after the initial weeks, it has been more like 07:30-09:30 and 18:30-21:00 on 5 days, plus a long changeover day of say 15 hours, and one day off. Even that only totals 37.5 hours. And from this season most TOs, at least in France, are giving staff an extra day off, reducing this to 32 hours in practice. Giving 3 hours to cover some flexibility on deliveries, changeover etc and still fit within a 35-hour week. It clearly isn't "impossible".


In January...

The hours I mention were the hours they were working. If the hours you talk of are actually accurate somewhere then all kudos to them.

But how the hell you're meant to prepare, cook, serve and clean up a 3 course meal for 12-15 people in 2.5 hours is a mystery to me, unless it's microwave lasagne or something.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Mike Pow wrote:
dp wrote:
Mike Pow wrote:
Out of curiosity DP, what do you do in the 'real world' please?


I'm not sure what difference it makes but I am a company director in the field of concert and theatrical lighting and rigging. Why do you ask?


I was curious to see if you were the Exploiter or the Exploited.


Both. As an MD of one, I have a tendency to exploit myself.
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Alpinebear wrote:
What happens at the moment if a seasonaire say breaks a leg? Do they receive any money when they are not working? Are they sent back to the U.K.?


What happens when a race horse breaks its leg? Well much the same thing.
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Old Man Of Lech wrote:
. I once worked out that if you take in to account all the parts of the remuneration package, even the lowest paid staff were in receipt of approx. 440-600 a week, depending on job role.


arf, you sound like the feminists who price up a housewife's services as 50K year : (sex, cleaning, child care etc).
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Who's more exploited:
1) Chalet staff, usually young, without mandatory overheads (kids etc.), geographically and socially mobile, paid below minimum wage, who's bosses are one regulatory change away from having no business...

2) ... or e.g. retail bank staff, typically older, have to make the bills each month, geographically immobile due to family responsibilities, paid above minimum wage but can't take any career risk, who's bosses fly around in private jets, live in mansions and drive expensive cars?

Removing the _option_ of young people to work in chalets, by changing the price structure such that demand disappears, reduces their choices and doesn't sound to me like it helps them. It may force them immediately into what society perceives as a "better" job - e.g. training to be an accountant, on 50-60hr weeks and £35k/yr, having a miserable time.

It would be sad if my kids didn't at least have the _option_ to work in a chalet.
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davidof:- Pity you are so ignorant.
What happens at the moment if a seasonaire say breaks a leg? Do they receive any money when they are not working? Are they sent back to the U.K.?
Very simply. They will be taken care of, probably far better & faster than if it occurs in the UK, at a local clinic/hospital. When they are ready to leave said hospital, they will be sent home sometimes by private transfer/air ambulance. (happened to one of my staff this season). The contracts usually have a clause about how long a staff member can be away from work before their contract is terminated and remember in a 4-5 month season, you cannot keep an employee on but not able to work for too long. Your analogy about the racehorse simply illustrate your level of ignorance about the whole subject.

davidof:-arf, you sound like the feminists who price up a housewife's services as 50K year

More ignorance of the subject. You obviously have NO idea of what is involved in employing staff in these roles. When an employee is provided with a season LP, 3 meals a day, equipment hire for the season,training(ok some companies are better at this than others), transport to & from UK to resort, but most importantly accommodation, the package does indeed amount to hundreds of euros a week. Accommodation for some of my staff a few seasons ago was 6000e for a room for 2 for the season for some of them.
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I have another way of looking at this for people who don't believe chalet staff are free agents who are happy with the package:

I skied 22 weeks in my ski season - 5 half days and 1 full day per week. I did so based in Courchevel 1850. It cost me nothing. My pay and tips went on beer and ski gear. Everything else was free (transport/pass/food/lodgings).

Sure I had to work hard around that skiing.

But what would I have had to pay to ski that much in Courchevel? THAT is the real value of my employment that season - 77 days skiing in 1850 all paid for. Call it £100 per day after tax? £8000 post tax in 4.5 months? Perfectly respectable isn't it?
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Old Man Of Lech wrote:
davidof:- Pity you are so ignorant.


don't worry mate, I worked for the biggest UK winter tour operator and know what happens.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
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jedster;- You show far more sense and understanding of a ski season than so many of those commenting on here have. It may have seemed free but to be honest you worked dammed hard to get that. Well done & said. Some people just cannot see past those low levels of pay, which are for the most part incidental to everything else in the season. Glad you worked hard. it's character building!
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 Poster: A snowHead
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Why don't young folks make a career out Ski Tourism rather than treating it as a must thing to do in my gap year?

Companies are more likely to treat & reward you much better.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
davidof: No worries here. Working for Crystal as you claim to have done was just a poor choice on your part. They do operate at the lower end of the spectrum. Having worked for now 4 UK TO's, 3 good 1 rubbish, I think I seem to have a much better understanding of the realities than you ever will.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
stanton wrote:
Why don't young folks make a career out Ski Tourism rather than treating it as a must thing to do in my gap year?

Companies are more likely to treat & reward you much better.


Because Mum, Dad and university are selling them this dream

Quote:
e.g. training to be an accountant, on 50-60hr weeks and £35k/yr, having a miserable time.
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stanton & Mike Pow.
Some people do make careers out of ski tourism. Most of the managers, regional, national, executive chefs and sometimes CEO's & MD's started their careers as reps or chalet host's. In fact the present CEO of Hotelplan, owners of Ski Total, Ski Esprit & Inghams did exactly that.
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Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Going back to the Mountain Heaven article they state "What does this mean for British chalet staff?" they say:

•They will receive more pay each week

But it doesn't say how much more. So the question would be actually what do they get paid now and what would they get paid in the future. And perhaps more importantly, given all the other costs of staff is it really significant?

•They will receive free accommodation and food, which cannot be deducted from pay (which has actually always been the law in France)

So no effect right? Or am I missing something..

•Chalet staff may work fewer hours in a week or be compensated for the extra hours over and above the 35 core hours

OK, So as per point one. Assuming they work some extra hours, how much cost will that actually add? How many hours do they need staff to work. Can't be more than 48 hours because of the WTD right? So an extra 13 hours at minimum wage tops?

•The tradition of ski companies providing free lift passes, equipment hire and insurance may disappear as they do not have to be legally paid to staff

Right so here's the choice. The chalet companies can either pay the extra wages and claw it bag by excluding some of the previous benefits. Or they can keep those and increase their prices a little. Is that so very difficult to balance out? Does this really kill chalet holidays and seasonairing?

Would the seasonaires on here still do it if they got more wages but had to pay for their equipment or insurance?
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Old Man Of Lech wrote:
stanton & Mike Pow.
Some people do make careers out of ski tourism. Most of the managers, regional, national, executive chefs and sometimes CEO's & MD's started their careers as reps or chalet host's. In fact the present CEO of Hotelplan, owners of Ski Total, Ski Esprit & Inghams did exactly that.


I was sold the dream but didn't buy.

I've been in the industry as they say since 1993. Off and on until 1999. Then pretty much every season since.

Very happy with my decision Smile
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jedster wrote:
I have another way of looking at this for people who don't believe chalet staff are free agents who are happy with the package:

I skied 22 weeks in my ski season - 5 half days and 1 full day per week. I did so based in Courchevel 1850. It cost me nothing. My pay and tips went on beer and ski gear. Everything else was free (transport/pass/food/lodgings).

Sure I had to work hard around that skiing.

But what would I have had to pay to ski that much in Courchevel? THAT is the real value of my employment that season - 77 days skiing in 1850 all paid for. Call it £100 per day after tax? £8000 post tax in 4.5 months? Perfectly respectable isn't it?


Well said that Man!
I've stayed in many a chalet and the standards vary massively ( as do the costs) the one thing I will say is that the staff who make it their job to look after you tend to get very well rewarded with tips which are probably far in excess of any wage they make. The lazy idle staff who stay in bed don't get up or have hangovers and attitudes deserve all they get as after all it is the hospitality industry isn't it. It is a lifestyle choice and many really don't give a monkeys about the job only the skiing and lifestyle. The smart ones combine both and have a great time and make money . The operators will always try to cut costs but if you trim it too far its pretty evident that you might as well be a Butlins! The last chalet holiday I went on was abysmal caused purely by the staff who didn't give a sh*t. Ive stayed in hotels since!
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Mike Pow wrote:
stanton wrote:
Why don't young folks make a career out Ski Tourism rather than treating it as a must thing to do in my gap year?

Companies are more likely to treat & reward you much better.


Because Mum, Dad and university are selling them this dream

Quote:
e.g. training to be an accountant, on 50-60hr weeks and £35k/yr, having a miserable time.


There wasn't really a career path resort side in the industry when I did it, once you get to 'resort manager' that is it unless you want to go work in the UK office.
Resort Manager for the chalet companies i worked for was about £150pw max. Some companies had area managers that were more of a full time UK pay type job but then worked UK office in summer.

In regards to working hours that everyone goes on about here is what I generally worked -

Hotel staff 4* (waiter/cleaner/kitchen porter) - 7am-10/11am and 5pm-11pm 5 days with 1 lunch shift a week 11am-3pm & changeover day 7am to 11pm non stop (1 day off) plus snow clearing etc where needed (heavy snowfall could see a few guys working all day between shifts to clear terrace, car park, balconies)
Club hotel staff (waiter/cleaner/kitchen porter) - 7am-10/11am and 5pm-10pm 5 days, changeover 7am-11pm non stop (1 day off)
Chalet host (chef/cleaner working as a pair) - 7am-10am and 6pm-10pm 5 days, depending on company 1 morning spent at supermarket (10am-1pm) changeover 7am-11pm non stop (1 day off)
Resort manager - no fixed hours, transfer day either at airports or train stations and could be from 5am-2am, usually a weekly staff meeting of 1-2hrs, chalet guest rounds of 1-2hrs a night, inspections 1-2hrs a week, accounts 2 hrs a week, 1 full day off

I felt that chalet hosting is you were efficient was the best balance of work/lifestyle/money/responsibility and that looks like it clocks in at about 54 hrs per week, but its kind of what I feel now as a 'normal job' worker are 'wasted hours' - having almost all day to go out and ski and even a few hours to socialise after work 5 days a week is far preferable to sitting in an office all day (when you could be doing something outside, in daylight) and then sitting watching TV in the 'wasted hours' between work and sleep...
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@Layne, indeed. Skipping the exploitation side if things, which undoubtedly happens either due to pushy management or inexperienced or scared employees. The current set up is free at point of joining and ongoing costs and payment are clear.

i.e. they get me there, I get room and most food, ski hire, lift pass. It costs me nothing and 150 euros a week plus tips for myself.

As opposed to

I get 400 euros a week, but then they deduct lift pass, tax etc. Tips are pooled and then taxed before sharing. I might work a few less hours but I walk out with 100 euros a week.

(Clearly I have made those figures up, but I am sure you get the idea)

Who is also to say that the unscrupulous TO's who currently by lift passes in bulk but don't pass those savings on to the holidaymaker (God forbid anyone would do that eh) won't do the same to the employee!
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
ansta1 wrote:
Who is also to say that the unscrupulous TO's who currently by lift passes in bulk but don't pass those savings on to the holidaymaker (God forbid anyone would do that eh) won't do the same to the employee!

I thought that the system was that the employee took a copy of their employment contract to the lift pass office to get the discounted lift pass.
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