Ski Club 2.0 Home
Snow Reports
FAQFAQ

Mail for help.Help!!

Log in to snowHeads to make it MUCH better!
Username:-
 Password:
Remember me:
durr, I forgot...
Or Register
(to be a proper snow-head, all official-like!)

Recommended Avalanche Safety Gear

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Arno wrote:
My observation is that there is more on digging technique now than there was when I first started taking courses on this stuff (about 15 years ago). Most of my training has been in Europe

Sample of 1 so read into that what you will


There is, largely because the greatest time component in a typical rescue is digging so there is a big win if you are more efficient. However as I said above, the whole chain from route choice, to group management to S&R are considered in French club training. The result is fewer incidents with club groups.
latest report     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Interesting- as a punter who takes a course every now and then mixed with ad hoc training from guides and instructors itís quite hard to tell whether variations of emphasis are down to the individual teachers or changing practices generally.
snow report     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Arno wrote:
Interesting- as a punter who takes a course every now and then mixed with ad hoc training from guides and instructors itís quite hard to tell whether variations of emphasis are down to the individual teachers or changing practices generally.


There are a lot of conferences and papers where best practices are discussed - ICAR and the ISSW being the principal international ones. Representatives from the country governing bodies (FFME, ENSA etc for France) as well as trainers will attend and the information will then filter down to guides and instructors as well as via the country federations. For example the idea of "strategic shovelling" has its roots in an IKAR paper by Chris Semmel etc. from the German Alpine Club in 2005 which found its way into the English speaking world in 2008 in Bruce Edgerly's article on strategic shoveling. Before that research on how long it took to dig out buried skiers using shovels, skis, hands really highlighted the importance of this point. There is a lot of international cooperation and dissemination of information at a high level. As Ise mentioned, the AIARE are good as they have a standard syllabus that is taught where as training from (in France) the ANENA, FFME club, FFCAM club may vary somewhat as there is not a formal syllabus as such.

There is a bit of a focus on snowheads, in my opinion, on the sharp end of things: gear, avalanche rescue whereas the problem has to be viewed in the whole from trip planning, group management onwards. If you are involved in an avalanche rescue of your group or friend you've already made a big error somewhere.
snow report     
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
Arno wrote:
Interesting- as a punter who takes a course every now and then mixed with ad hoc training from guides and instructors itís quite hard to tell whether variations of emphasis are down to the individual teachers or changing practices generally.


That's really useful feedback. Partly because you're saying what I had already concluded and I suffer from confirmation bias no less than anyone else Happy

There's a variety of issues. One of them is that is getting to be a data-centric field so we get great stuff from people Ian McCammon, Manuel Genswein and others who are engineers and comfortable with maths. That kind of data approach isn't going to work too well with all practitioners in the field who can be fairly practical hands-on people. Most of those people also aren't trained as educators and aren't always aware of the problems around communicating fairly difficult concepts. In First Aid nowadays we have to hold Education and Training qualifications but for my other qualifications, they're just about expertise in the actual field. So even when people try to communicate the same thing it doesn't always work out.

We could probably do with some more formality in search protocols and to try and ensure they're evidence-based. I'm sure it's all being noted somewhere Very Happy
snow report     
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
davidof wrote:


There is a bit of a focus on snowheads, in my opinion, on the sharp end of things: gear, avalanche rescue whereas the problem has to be viewed in the whole from trip planning, group management onwards. If you are involved in an avalanche rescue of your group or friend you've already made a big error somewhere.


Sure but at least gear is something that can be fairly unambiguous - buy the gear, invest the time and education into knowing how to use it reflexively. Take time to refresh.

Avy avoidance is of course more important but very difficult to discuss in a written forum without seeing field conditions. People being honest about their own feck-ups helps of course but still is a bit of a case of "don't do what I did". But there is still a lot to speaking up in a group situation, sensible party size and definitely recognising the symptoms of powder blindness and desire to claim bragging rights etc.
ski holidays     



Terms and conditions  Privacy Policy