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Ankle eversion / foot tipping on hard packed and ice.

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
@rjs, all I'm saying is that eversion of the ankle shouldn't be easily possible and that you edge the ski by moving the shin laterally into the hill and if required compensate by angulating out at the hip.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
auntie masque wrote:

Mike pow, balance has little to do with edge grip, it's predominantly the 'perpendicular force' to the snow/ice surface generated by angulation which includes controled lateral knee movement to overcome the 'shear' force generated by gravity and the centripetal movement of the turn. Whilst wearing close fitting boots it may well feel that foot movement is possible but it is the overall change to leg and hip position that changes in response to what we feel is foot control. Ask a x-country skier about ankle mobility and edge control Twisted Evil


Fascinating rolling eyes


Quote:
What are they teaching you muppets Puzzled


Right back at you.

Having observed and taught self-proclaimed 'expert carvers', far too many are only concerned / conscious of the ski in front of their toes with little to no regard for the ski behind their heels.

A point I raised in the other thread you referenced.

Without the appropriate fore/aft, lateral and vertical balance - which is a dynamic thing and constantly changing - then full ski edge grip can not be achieved and maintained.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@Mike Pow, I don't disagree, all turns are dynamic and rely on the ability of the skier to adjust body position and movement to control the turn. Though modern ski shape has made it possible to 'park and ride' a carve from inception to completion with full edge grip. You are making a distinction between what may be called a 'casual carver' on equipment designed to flatter inadequate technique and a racer on equipment that is designed to challenge his/her skills. Teaching was a reference to basic classroom physics/applied maths not skiing.
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auntie masque wrote:
@Mike Pow, I don't disagree, all turns are dynamic and rely on the ability of the skier to adjust body position and movement to control the turn. Though modern ski shape has made it possible to 'park and ride' a carve from inception to completion with full edge grip. You are making a distinction between what may be called a 'casual carver' on equipment designed to flatter inadequate technique and a racer on equipment that is designed to challenge his/her skills. Teaching was a reference to basic classroom physics/applied maths not skiing.


I don't classify 'park and ride' skiing as carving. It's a high speed traverse with little to no curvature in the turn shape.

Neither that nor what you call 'casual carving' will get the job done on the OP's icy scenario.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Quote:

snowheads68 wrote:
Doesn't hip angulation only come into play in long turns? No time to do it in medium, or certainly short turns.

Hip angulation works fine in short turns too. Watch any video of slalom skiing.


Exactly
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snowheads68 wrote:
Is this the key to getting grip on ice/ hard packed?

I find it helps more than anything and can really feel the weight going through the inside edge of the outside ski. This is crucial on ice to avoid slipping caused by rotary forces. The reason ice skates grip is because the blade is in the middle of the foot and the weight goes through it.



Yeah, totally agree. Discovering this made the difference between “ice - yikes! Avoid at all costs” and “ice - yippee, love it!”

It’s a TINY movement, but makes all the difference. I’m not trying to carve on ice btw, but do a controlled skidded turn. Means I can go where I want to, instead of the skis taking me for a spin.
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