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Differing Instructor Advice - Facing Down The Mountain

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
I think that image illustrates the point - throughout the turn she is exhibiting counter. Check her chest v. diriction of outer ski.

Frame 2 shows her trying to get her chest pointing inside the turn (anti-clockwise counter) ahead to help bring the outer ski around aggressively and by Frame 6 she is turing chest down slope agains (clockwise) to set up next turn.

If I'm reading rjs correctly he isn't suggesting a static upper body always perpendicular to fall line.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
A simple way to explain this is that when skiing the chest/upper body should typically follow the line of momentum of the skier, not necessarily the fall line.

For example, in a slalom the shoulders are mainly perpendicular to the fall line and in a downhill race perpendicular to the skis...
Or say when a recreational skier is skiing a steep gully the shoulders should face down the hill (fall line) as the this is where you want your body to go in the same way as on an easy green run the shoulders will be perpendicular to the skis.

@karin has it right..
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Quote:


A simple way to explain this is that when skiing the chest/upper body should typically follow the line of momentum of the skier, not necessarily the fall line.

For example, in a slalom the shoulders are mainly perpendicular to the fall line and in a downhill race perpendicular to the skis...
Or say when a recreational skier is skiing a steep gully the shoulders should face down the hill (fall line) as the this is where you want your body to go in the same way as on an easy green run the shoulders will be perpendicular to the skis.

@karin has it right..


Very clear. Even better than karin's good explanation!
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
jedster wrote:
This is another good illustration of what I mean I think:

It is a good illustration of what happens if you get things wrong, followed by a recovery from that. It isn't an example of what should be done.

She doesn't separate correctly at the waist in the first frame, when she starts to angulate/incline she transfers pressure to the inside ski which hooks up and tracks to the inside of the turn. This throws her off balance and her upper body moves around.

Quote:
I don't claim to be a ski coach but I generally find it more persuasive if people address the point being made rather than avoid the point with a claim to authority.

I described the general ideas that we teach as well as specific differences between race and recreational techniques, you just keep telling me that I'm wrong.

skimottaret wrote:
A simple way to explain this is that when skiing the chest/upper body should typically follow the line of momentum of the skier, not necessarily the fall line.

For example, in a slalom the shoulders are mainly perpendicular to the fall line and in a downhill race perpendicular to the skis...

You turn in a Downhill too. I have a strong memory of looking back up at the Choucas piste in Meribel after it had been used for DH warmup, everyone had been skiing arc-to-arc on 50m skis using the whole width of the piste. The technique is just the same as for SL and GS, we don't tell trainees to turn their shoulders like in the long turn video above.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
jedster wrote:
Quote:


A simple way to explain this is that when skiing the chest/upper body should typically follow the line of momentum of the skier, not necessarily the fall line.

For example, in a slalom the shoulders are mainly perpendicular to the fall line and in a downhill race perpendicular to the skis...
Or say when a recreational skier is skiing a steep gully the shoulders should face down the hill (fall line) as the this is where you want your body to go in the same way as on an easy green run the shoulders will be perpendicular to the skis.

@karin has it right..


Very clear. Even better than karin's good explanation!


+1 that works for me too. In short, fall line turns on steeps I just look straight down and keep my chest pointing ahead with the skis turning underneath with as much separation as I can achieve. In long radius turns I like to follow the path of the skis much more for a nice flowing ride.
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Quote:

I described the general ideas that we teach as well as specific differences between race and recreational techniques, you just keep telling me that I'm wrong.


The only thing I disagreed with you about is whether your shoulders should face down the fall line throughout long turns. If you ever come across a photo sequence showing a top skier doing that I would love to see it. But otherwise let's leave it here shall we? I'm not trying to wind you up.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Clearly the real answer is, “it depends” and one’s ability to discern and implement this appropriately is a measure of one’s skills.
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