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Contact lenses

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Levi215 wrote:
I haven't read all responses but my experience seems to differ from most. I've been skiing 4 years and got glasses last year, skied with contacts a couple of weeks ago for the first time. I have an astigmatism so the contacts aren't bang on and are weighted to avoid rotation so maybe not a typical lens user. That said, I found that I lost a lens pretty much every day and during runs the lens would rotate so my vision would blur (plenty of blinking required to get it back). I think the lenses dried and came out (soft dailies) so the last couple of days I skied without. Had goggles on for all of it.


Sounds like they're drying out. I have astigmatism but there isn't a daily lens on the market afaik that corrects both the astigmatism and the dry eye problem. For me, being able to wear contacts is more important than having perfect vision, so I use Total 1 lenses that stay moist. I have never lost a lens since switching to these. Vision is still very good, but text can be harder to read than with my glasses. It's not really a problem when skiing.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
For those who have mentioned reading map issues with lenses, I agree but I do carry a pair of very slim reading glasses they are 12mm in height and fit into a cigar size case and fit into a pocket easily.. think they cost me £10 online.. rule of thumb if your lenses are -2.00 buy +2.00 reading lenses.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Skied for many years with soft contact lenses. Never had a problem.

Now I only use the lenses in heavy snow, I wear prescription sunglasses the rest of the time.
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You need to Login to know who's really who.
After 30 odd years of glasses (and a very short try of contacts in the 90's) I skied in daily contacts for the first time last March. Don't know why I didn't try them before!

Sure beats messing around with steamed up goggles and glasses.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Like some of you I've been wearing contacts for 40 years, and would endorse whats been said before.

From personal experience: So far no-one has mentioned sun cream - it runs in the eyes if you're getting very sweaty and can dry the lenses out. I have found Piz Buin Day long cream to be the best, but better still keep the forehead covered & no cream needed - refer to the rolling eyes Helmet thread rolling eyes

Alcohol drys the tarsal lids glands out resulting in a diminished oil secretion, and the tears evaporate more quickly because of the diminished oil content and can result in dry eyes too. Be careful on the juice!

I have switched from Accu Vue to silicon lenses, no turning inside out and better moisture content - discuss with you opticians
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Anyone who has struggled with contact lenses in the past, I would suggest try new contact lenses, the technology has moved on recently and the lenses are thinner, softer and let more oxygen through. Great for skiing and all sports except swimming, as you need to wear goggles so they don't get pushed out the eyes which looks a bit stupid when you're sunbathing in some exotic location.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Gas perm lenses for me. Much better overall vision than softs, easier if also astygmatic. Worn them for many a year. Literal pain if you get bits in them, but fortunately rare ( get to be an expert at cl extract, wash with tiny cl solution pocket bottle & reinsrt whilst in snowy hoolie!)
Only real issue I have is that they dry and get uncomfy once I stop and go indoors into a warmer environment, e.g. shop or hotel room; OK once remove, clean & reinsert.
Wear goggles, sunnies maybe: but usually find wind in eyes makes them water just due to skiing at normal recreational speeds.
No problems at any temp or weather conditions - but agree with the suncream (+sweat) issue.
These days, being older, the reading glasses are in an accessible pocket. (Apparently, you can get varifocal contacts now.)


Last edited by Then you can post your own questions or snow reports... on Wed 17-05-17 18:28; edited 1 time in total
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@Grizzler, gas perm is rather old hat on the lens front...
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@under a new name, I went to Specsavers recently, wanting to get some softs. Optician basically refused, saying GPs were much superior, especially in vision quality, and that she wouldn't offer softs to someone already wearing GPs as I'd be mightily disappointed.
Yes they may be a tad more faff to put in and settle (tho' with luck about by 30 secs at the moment) - but Specsavers got me a really comfy, well-fitting pair and I'm very happy with them, superb distance vision (the rest is age anyway). Did try softs about 5 years ago & couldn't get anywhere near the same quality of distance vision in them, nor as good a correction for the astigmatism.
Wouldn't therefore discount them at all as yesterday's news.
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
I ski with one contact lens in my right eye. I find this waters more than my left eye (cannot definitively blame this on the contact lens of course). The effect for me is slightly worse with sunnies (wrap around) than goggles - which much diminish but not eradicate the problem entirely. While it can sometimes blear (is this a word? Puzzled ) the vision when skiing fast the effect it is not that big a deal. Non of this is a deal breaker. I won't contemplate glasses under googles, all that misting up etc. until I absolutely have to. On the upside is that the lens tends to be well enough lubricated that it lasts for a couple of apres-ski beers without drying out. I carry drops though for later in the evening or change to glasses. It is inside not outside that drys out the eyes on ski trips - at least again for me.

Id give it a go - everyone's eyes are different but chances are you'll be fine. Good tip re spares (although I can't actually recall having to bother using it). Unless your contact lens are bog standard i.e. just prescription and not customised for astygmatism or something the I'd be wary of relying on the local supermarket to stock what you need. In some countries they won't even give you contact lens - they insist on you having an eye test whilst others do indeed sell them in the supermarket. Best to take you own surplus supply - I do - or at least find out before you go.
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
@Grizzler, maybe it's to do with the astigmatism?
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
MogulMonkey wrote:
For those who have mentioned reading map issues with lenses, I agree but I do carry a pair of very slim reading glasses they are 12mm in height and fit into a cigar size case and fit into a pocket easily.. think they cost me £10 online.. rule of thumb if your lenses are -2.00 buy +2.00 reading lenses.


Interesting. I took a small magnifying glass on a trekking holiday for similar issue.. Worked a treat and now plan to take it on ski trips. Fits in pocket nicely. Much easier than squinting...
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
@under a new name, certainly, historically, GPs were much easier/better for correcting astigmatism ( 'toric' lenses); though they offer this in softs too. They also seemed to last longer as useable good vision lenses if your glasses prescription kept changing (in my case getting more and more short sighted). Finally they do just technically give clearer overall vision, apparently.
All to do with them riding on a 'tear film' over the corneas rather than right on it as softs do.
They also, historically, allowed more oxygen to the eye than softs. I have extra blood vessels in my eye because of over use of old softs many years ago, and they still see this as a potential issue, I gather, even with much better softs these days.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
@Grizzler, i wear GPs day to day but for sports always use dailies, found them much better.
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