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How to service or maintain ski bindings

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Hi Y'all. I am planning to drive to and spend the season in the alps. Since I will be out early when conditons may be rocky, I am taking my old skis which still have edges and base. My question is how to service and test the bindings.

These are Salmon S12ti rental bindings. Bought in 2009, skied for 5 years, then left in garage for 5 years. I have slid the heel and toe piece off. Looks a bit cruddy. Can these be dismantled further. Can I clean/soak in WD40. What type of grease should then be applied, where and how. Is there any way to function check the bindings afterwards.

Appreciate any help - thanks
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
I wil make no comment other than WD40 dries sticky and attracts dirt, so is probably not the thing to use to clean anything.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
As someone who has badly smashed knee from binding not releasing, for whatever the reason was, I would highly recommend that you get them serviced and checked for DIN setting by someone with the equipment to test it correctly for release- you only have one set of knees Smile
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
ACF50 may be good for general maintenance, that stuff is amazing but I have never tried it on bindings. But as said above, get them properly tested for release every so often.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
I hear you about looking after my knees. I don't think the retail shops near me would service just the bindings or have the kit to test release. Even if I took them in how do I know if they just wiped them with an oily rag.

I will try to get them tested when I am out in Val, the rental shops should have the kit. Meanwhile I would like to do as much as possible with them, so at least I know they are clean and greased.
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Quote:

the rental shops should have the kit


I would not take that as guaranteed...
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Apart from my specific situation, there is the general question about what we should all be doing to maintain our bindings from year to year. I guess most of us do nothing. How long do they last and how accurate are they after a few years?
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@AndyT, There is also an underlying question as to how accurate and effective they are when new...

Until relatively recently I think the perceived wisdom was that they were all more or less the same. Not helped that they all more or less had identical function (Looks and Markers excepted, to a degree).

Mine get put in the garage in late April and (hopefully) taken out again in late November. Replaced with the skis when they wear out, or unless they break, (which a mostly unskied heel did on me at the start of last winter), or I think they look particularly cool.
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Iíve had my main set for 9 years and I just regularly check they open and close by hand to make sure they feel okay. Am sure I should be doing more (maybe not?) - most of us here would probably welcome any advice.
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
See http://salomontechnician.com/uploads/Salomon_technical_manual_alpine_1718.pdf - these are apparently the S 912 Ti bindings, which were declared end of life last year, so should you take them for servicing in the US they will typically refuse to touch them unless you sign a disclaimer. This also has a section on servicing, and silicon lubricants/sprays are specifically mentioned as not to be used on page 70.

IANAE...
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
Guys thanks for the comments - particularly the Alpine Workshop manual which has the meaning of the DIN setting as shown in the picture below.

There seems to be some uncertainty about how to treat bindings. It is as good not to degrade the plastic in any way, so I I washed my old S1 bindings in soapy water. This did not shift the black greasy dirt without a vigorous rub. Although I soaked the bindings, I doubt I have cleaned the inner workings and the all important spring. I have ordered some grease from SpyderJon and will apply in due course.

Given the comments and doubt about release value I made up a simple rig to try and test this. Made a sole plate to match my boot out of wood and attached a lever and weight. Weight times length gives the moment which is related to DIN setting by the chart posted below (if I can get pictures to post).

Results given in the next post.





Ok - first ever pictures posted - hope they work
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
OK - now for the results.

The chart attached shows what the DIN setting means. Note that DIN setting depends on your boot length. My skis are set at a DIN of 8 so I know what the turning moment should be for release. Moment is simply mass(kgs).9.81.length(m). Note the length for the toe release and the heel release are different.



First the results for my old Salomon S12ti rental bindings. This seems to show that the heel binding is well within tolerance, but the toe release is effectively 3 to 3.5 DIN lower than the setting of 8

[/url]

Decided to test my current skis which have Marker F12 touring bindings. These results seem to show that both heel and toe release well below their setting of DIN 8.

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In theory the method should be reasonably accurate so I am not sure what to make of it. I have been skiing on the F12 for 4 years and have probably never been ejected. So I conclude that I should stick with those settings and that I do not really need my S12 bindings set as high as 8.

Would be interesting to know if new bindings really release as per DIN and do these settings generally fall off with age?
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
How about you put the skis on and just adjust the bindings until you can twist or step out of them then tighten them half a turn? It was how we used to do it and it semed to work. If you find thatís too light on the mountain, many lift stations will have a screwdriver to make adjustments.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
@AndyT, while I am known geek.... thatís really interesting and a very elegantly simple test rig.

Which I think I may recreate next time Iím at home. I shall give you my results. I have ... 7 or so pairs of Markers to examine!
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
@under a new name, Thanks, I will be interested to see your results.

@Gordyjh, I used to be able to twist and pull out of my bindings when I had young knees and a DIN of 5. I wouldn't attempt that with old knees and a DIN of 8. Starting low and adjusting by trial and error is dodgy as I sometimes ski in places where I really don't want to risk premature ejection.
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
ousekjarr wrote:
See http://salomontechnician.com/uploads/Salomon_technical_manual_alpine_1718.pdf - these are apparently the S 912 Ti bindings, which were declared end of life last year, so should you take them for servicing in the US they will typically refuse to touch them unless you sign a disclaimer. This also has a section on servicing, and silicon lubricants/sprays are specifically mentioned as not to be used on page 70.

IANAE...


I have found they will not touch them at all even if you offer to sign a disclaimer in the SLC area in the USA. They will not even wax them.
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