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GPS safety gadget

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Hi all,

I'd like to show you a safety gadget all skiers and boarders should have. It's a small button which sends your GPS location and alert messages to selected contacts in emergencies. It's a new product which I hope will save some lives.

Please have a look,

handisos.co.uk

Thanks,

Pete
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Page can't be displayed - not a good start.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
chocksaway wrote:
Page can't be displayed - not a good start.


AFAIKS it is a bluetooth button that connects to an app on your telephone to send an SMS to selected contacts. The idea being the phone can be kept somewhere safe and warm and the button can be left accessible.
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
FIFY :

http://www.handitechnologies.com
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
This seems to be a 'button' that you glue to your clothing in an accessible place, which connects to your Android phone via Bluetooth. In an emergency, if you can't get to your phone you press the button, which then sends your GPS location to a predetermined list of contacts.

There aren't many muggings on the slopes, so the only time I can think of when you can't easily access your phone in an emergency is if buried in avalanche debris - when an easily reached button could be helpful. But this relies on (a) a glued-on button surviving the avalanche; (b) the bluetooth connection still working when both parts are buried; and (c) the buried phone still being able to connect to a network! I've no idea whether (b) and (c) will still work, but it seems less likely.

I guess you need Bluetooth and GPS permanently enabled on your phone, which isn't going to do the battery life any good. And there must be a risk that a simple fall will accidentally trigger the alert when you don't intend to.

Unless there is something I have missed, I don't think I'll be buying one.
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
@ecureuil,
Quote:

I guess you need Bluetooth and GPS permanently enabled on your phone, which isn't going to do the battery life any good.


I think most people leave BT and GPS permanently enabled these days, so I'm not sure that's a huge problem for most users.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
foxtrotzulu wrote:
@ecureuil,
Quote:

I guess you need Bluetooth and GPS permanently enabled on your phone, which isn't going to do the battery life any good.


I think most people leave BT and GPS permanently enabled these days, so I'm not sure that's a huge problem for most users.


BT yes but a always on gps would nail most phone batteries in an hour or two.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Works anywhere for up to 20 days:

https://buy.garmin.com/en-GB/GB/p/592606



https://www.dcrainmaker.com/2018/05/garmin-inreach-mini-satellite-tracker-in-depth-review.html
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
jbob wrote:
foxtrotzulu wrote:
@ecureuil,
Quote:

I guess you need Bluetooth and GPS permanently enabled on your phone, which isn't going to do the battery life any good.


I think most people leave BT and GPS permanently enabled these days, so I'm not sure that's a huge problem for most users.


BT yes but a always on gps would nail most phone batteries in an hour or two.


Plus it's good practice when skiing off-piste to have your phone turned off to avoid transceiver interference.
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
@altis, I have the previous version of that, the inreach SE. Fantastic bit of kit, very reliable. Crucially it allows two way satellite messaging so you can actually tell the emergency services what the problem is.
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
spyderjon wrote:

Plus it's good practice when skiing off-piste to have your phone turned off to avoid transceiver interference.


I think this is a bit contentious at the moment, there are studies suggesting if phone and transciever separated by 40cm there is no interference with transmitting. This season a guide told me their current advice is to have your phone switched on but separated by over 40cm so it's ready to be used asap to call emergency services (others in the party switch off their phones and begin search and rescue).

I have to say personally I agree with your advice because certainly with empirical testing a nearby mobile phone affects beacons search abilities. Also my impression would be that having the phone off would conserve battery and avoid the faff of all the others needing to switch theirs off. My other worry would be the position of burial, just because the beacon and phone start off over 40cm away doesn't mean they'd end up that way.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
betterinblack wrote:
spyderjon wrote:

Plus it's good practice when skiing off-piste to have your phone turned off to avoid transceiver interference.


I think this is a bit contentious at the moment, there are studies suggesting if phone and transciever separated by 40cm there is no interference with transmitting. This season a guide told me their current advice is to have your phone switched on but separated by over 40cm so it's ready to be used asap to call emergency services (others in the party switch off their phones and begin search and rescue).

I have to say personally I agree with your advice because certainly with empirical testing a nearby mobile phone affects beacons search abilities. Also my impression would be that having the phone off would conserve battery and avoid the faff of all the others needing to switch theirs off. My other worry would be the position of burial, just because the beacon and phone start off over 140cm away doesn't mean they'd end up that way.


I disagree. Phone off always.

Yes if there is a separation it is fine. However. If you are having the skit battered out of you by an avalanche you will probably not end up in a nice long line.

You will probably be compacted together. IE, your knee (where I keep my phone in a pocket and off) may be next to your chest where I keep my transceiver.

I would prefer something like the Garmin myself (disclaimer, my friends Uncle Min owns 1/2 of Garmin).
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
betterinblack wrote:

I think this is a bit contentious at the moment, there are studies suggesting if phone and transciever separated by 40cm there is no interference with transmitting.


It's not contentious really because the basic physics is well known and has been a long time. There aren't really studies as such, that suggests it's something that was hard to quantify and in need of measurement which it really is not. There does seem to be a lot of advice given about best practice which has no real basis, in this context best practice would be published papers, IKAR protocols, something from mountainsafetyinfo etc.

There is an issue with a receiving transceiver in close proximity to a source of interference. It should be fairly easy to see that the transmitting function of a transceiver isn't hugely impacted by nearby antagonists. The protocol is what it has been for many years, that the critical distance for interference is at the 20cm range. To allow for some settlement and redistribution the recommendation, in all the manuals, is a separation of around 50cm.

During a search it's normal to keep any potential antagonists out of the active area, so the guidelines are that phones (and some other electronics) should not be used within 25m of any active search.

This seems to come up on snowheads every six months eg http://snowheads.com/ski-forum/viewtopic.php?t=135180#3162903

From Manuel Genswein back in 2013, it's fair the say the definitive statement of best practice ..

Quote:

Recommendations for Recreational Users (Short Version)

Avoid wearing clothes with magnetic buttons or larger metallic and/or conductive parts (i.e., heated gloves). Be aware that food, candy, or cigarette box wrapping often includes thin metallic foil! In transmit mode a minimum distance of 20cm must be kept between avalanche rescue transceivers and any metallic object or electronic device. In search mode, keep a minimum distance of 50cm. All equipment on searching rescuers needs to be turned OFF, except radios, cell phones in airplane mode, headlamps without switch power voltage regulator (usually found in high-power devices with external battery packs), wristwatches without radio functions on the wrist, and devices providing backup transmit function in case of a secondary avalanche. All equipment on non-searching rescuers on the avalanche needs to be turned OFF, except cell phones, satellite phones, and PLBs. While a search is in progress, equipment use is restricted to brief emergency calls/messages at a minimum of 25m to the closest searching rescuer, devices providing a backup transmit function in case of a secondary avalanche, and headlamps


There still seems to be some difficulty distinguishing between a transmitting and receiving device.


Last edited by So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much on Mon 14-05-18 17:39; edited 1 time in total
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
I think this could be useful if i was abducted by aliens again....... #skiing with demons
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Here is another essential safety device
http://www.mountainsafety.co.uk/EP-Whistle-or-Torch.aspx
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Can we do avalanche cords again - please wink wink
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@chocksaway, Toofy Grin
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