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Dismounting rail-type bindings when travelling?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Right, practical question time. Just bought new (old stock) skis for both Mrs NBT and myself. Both are fitted with rail-mounted bindings. Are there any practical aspects I need to consider if I dismount one or both sets of bindings for transport? This way I can easily put both sets of skis in one bag
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
The only thing to consider is are you happy to fit them back on and check forward pressure when you arrive at your destination?
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@kieranm, the entire binding is mounted on one piece - both forward and rear pieces
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nbt wrote:
@kieranm, the entire binding is mounted on one piece - both forward and rear pieces

I think what kieranm is getting at is that you want to be sure that you've put both toe and heel pieces back in the right place for your actual boot sole length?

Assuming that they're currently in the right place (i.e. whatever forward pressure indicator your bindings have is set correctly) then a dob of tippex and/or a photo to compare with when you slide them back onto the rails ought to do the trick?
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
I always do it with my missus's skis, otherwise I can't fit them in the bag with mine. And having the bindings buried in amongst the clothes in my suitcase means they're less likely to be damaged by the throwers at the airport. As stated above, getting the forward pressure correct is the only thing to be aware of, every binding manufacturer uses a different way of measuring the FP and it is not always clear when the pressure is correct. Just using the boot sole length (found on the heel of the ski boots) and setting the binding correctly does not always give the correct FP. If in doubt, take them to a shop to get them checked before clipping in.
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
If in any doubt it should be possible to get a copy of the technical manual for your bindings which will have instructions for how to check the forward pressure. Even if a shop has done them I wouldn't be sure that they will have got them right.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
kieranm wrote:
Even if a shop has done them I wouldn't be sure that they will have got them right.


True.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@kieranm, @UkuleleDave, thanks, the bindings appear to be Marker Motion where as I say the heel and toe pieces are on a plate


http://youtube.com/v/BTqlv10_TqM

as such the key here would be ensuring that the toe piece remains in the correct location on the plate

Might need to consider wrapping them in something for protection during transport. Have loads of bubble wrap in the garage
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@nbt, ah... with you. Smile
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
I wonder how much difference the position of the toe pieces actually makes.

Yesterday I dug out some Z6s that were given to me a couple of years back.
I had used them one day last season, and assumed the bindings were still all set.
When I went to clip in at the top of the gondola, I noticed that there was a gap of about an inch between my heel and the rear binding.
Someone ( with big feet ) had borrowed them, and not reset them - no dramas.

I decided to move both the toe and the heel inwards to close the gap rather than just moving the heel towards the toe, or vice versa.
I should add that that I have moved bindings around loads and used to help the ski mechanic set up 100+ pairs per week on changeover day in 1988.
Way back when, the toe pieces were in a fixed position, and the heel binding was on a hire rail that was simply moved to the right place by lifting the "lock" with a flat headed screw driver until it was in the right place for the boot.
I completely get the idea of having a moveable toe too, so that the centre of the boot can remain over the centre of the ski ( I think some manufacturers used to call this the "Torsion Box" ). Although as I have mainly boarded for the last 15 years, ski tech has left be behind somewhat.
Anyhow, I did not really want to take my boots off, and did not know the sole length, so I moved the toe piece down to the setting about 321-315, and slid the heel up so my boot fitted ok. Repeat on the other ski and off we go.
I did a few runs of various terrain including a couple of steepish blacks and some fast cruisy blues, but nothing crazy and my speed did not go above 65 KMH. All turns seem ok, from fast carves to short swing, I did a couple of park runs too ( boxes and small & medium hits).
On each lift, I had nagging doubts as to weather this "random" setup was correct, even though everything was working. Somehow ( wrongly it now seems) I decided that the bindings were maybe a tad too far back just because it looked like that when comparing them with other peoples bindings sat with me on the lifts ( even though they felt fine). So atop Mosettes I moved both feet forwards about 20mm. I carried on skiing until 4PM without issue.
I felt better in my head that they were now "right", though I can't really say that I noticed any difference in the next 2 hours.
When I took the skis and boots off to put them in the car I noticed that when I had adjusted them, I had in fact moved one of them 30mm and the other only 20, I also noticed that my boot sole was 305 mm.
So the whole time the bindings had been too far forwards ( even more after I changed them ), and for the last 2 hours one foot was offset from the other.
I learned to ski a long time ago, and I do it through muscle memory as I things like hip angulation and edge angle are just words to me. I wonder if my body was automatically adjusting its bio mechanics to compensate for the badly set up skis, or whether for a recreational / occasional skier these differences in set-up make no perceivable difference other then in one's mind.
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