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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Old Fartbag wrote:
@foxtrotzulu, Their training is such, that any such referral will be taken more seriously than "Mi mum says I have Necrotizing Fibromyalgia, or possibly Anal Glaucoma." Toofy Grin
It may indeed be taken more seriously in the same way that it would be taken less seriously if you said "Some American teenager on FB said he thought I had kuru". But neither the American teenager, your mum or an osteopath are making any sort of 'referral'. They are all just saying 'I think you've got x, go and see a doctor.' Nobody is suggesting that osteopaths don't have more medical knowledge, in some areas, than someone with no medical knowledge at all. (I would hope that they would be better at diagnosing a broken leg than I would). However, you were implying some sort of special/official/recognised status when it comes to osteopaths' referrals/diagnoses and I haven't heard any evidence to suggest that's true. I rather suspect that a significant proportion of GPs will regard anything an osteo or chiropractor says with a large pinch of salt.
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
@foxtrotzulu, When it comes to their skill set...I have found they have more in-depth medical knowledge than a GP....But I've actually been to some. wink

This has gone as far as it can go, so I respectfully (for everybody else's sanity), bow out.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
@Old Fartbag,
Quote:

This has gone as far as it can go, so I respectfully (for everybody else's sanity), bow out.

Agreed.
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@foxtrotzulu, on the contrary, many I know are quite respectful of an osteopath's opinion, and even visit them for treatment themselves. MY FIL was a member of the Sports Medicine Association which also included many professional team doctors from football, rugby and cricket. He used to attend and lecture at the conference each year. He would now be 90 and retired 15 years ago, so I'm not talking about something new.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
As for student finance, it is available, and you apply through UCAS.
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You'll need to Register first of course.
@Hells Bells, i have myself seen an osteo, at the college in London many years ago. Lower back spasm, helped as much as any manipulation would.

I am sure there are many skilled osteos, but it does come with unscientific baggage. Which, in this day and age, suggests to me a level of credulity that makes me doubt their general capability.

I have also seen a chiropractor, when I was younger and more foolish. Similar problem, similar treatment, similar result.

Doesn’t mean I’d do it again.
ski holidays     
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
If back problems persist, I believe it's essential to get an MRI scan done. I had chronic sciatica flare up for the first time ever about ten years ago. GP said it "should" wear off and prescribed pain killers. I tried an Osteopath who within 5 minutes diagnosed what it was and treated it a few times -££££. Made no difference. It was getting worse and worse. GP then suggested acupuncture. Made no difference. Eventually after months of waiting and suffering I had an MRI scan. I was told I had a spur of bone growing off my spine into my sciatic nerve. I was told pain management or surgery were the only options. Nothing else was going to make a blind bit of difference.

At times, the pain was so bad I couldn't work. I had a CT guided epidural injections into my spine (the most painful thing I've ever had); which gave me relief for about 2-3 months. I had four of them over a space of about 18 months. After the fourth injection I was told I couldn't have any more and would have to have surgery. They cut the piece of bone off my spine and it cured the problem.

If I hadn't had the MRI scan, I could have been wasting time and money on osteopaths, chiropractors, acupuncture and physiotherapy for goodness knows how long; when none of it would have helped; in fact some of it could have compounded the problem.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
@Awdbugga, Sciatica is truly horrible. I can sympathise. I also had caudal epidurals into my spine. Happily, it was under sedation. Very Happy Instant cure Very Happy Very Happy (Well, sort of instant. I felt so much better that I vaulted a gate 24 hours after the epidural which set me right back to the start. I had another epidural about a month later and have been sciatica free for about three years now. Thank God.
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 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
@Awdbugga, That is exactly why I made the comment earlier in the thread, about getting a scan and medical intervention if the problem continues. All these people are fine for an acute problem, not a chronic one, with a more sinister underlying cause.

I went through the same as you and it took me far too long to do the right thing....had injections, but only surgery worked. Atm. I'm worried that I've upset my lower back again.....so am doing gentle rehab type exercises and hoping for the best. Skiing in Jan will be the Acid Test.
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
foxtrotzulu wrote:
@Awdbugga, Sciatica is truly horrible. I can sympathise. I also had caudal epidurals into my spine. Happily, it was under sedation. Very Happy Instant cure Very Happy Very Happy (Well, sort of instant. I felt so much better that I vaulted a gate 24 hours after the epidural which set me right back to the start. I had another epidural about a month later and have been sciatica free for about three years now. Thank God.


Believe me, you were lucky you had the epidural under sedation. By far and away the worst pain I've ever endured. They had me strapped to a table in a short doughnut shaped scanner. Apparently the injection had to be guided to within millimetres of the correct spot. The doctor then leaned on me with all his weight to stop me moving. He shoved the needle in slowly and then looked at the monitor, wiggled the needle around, looked at the monitor, pushed it in a bit more, looked at the monitor again, repeating the process god know how many times. I was close to tears. After about ten minutes and numerous attempts he said he couldn't get it in the right position and would have to start again; was I happy for him to do so. Shocked Well I'd pretty much reached the point were I could no longer work, so it was sh*t or bust. So in he went again. Thankfully he managed to get to the spot a lot quicker the second time.
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
When I was a reasonably competitive distance runner back in the 80s and 90s, I often went to see an osteopath in preference to a physio, for acute injuries. Some physios just seemed reluctant to be very 'hands-on' and use friction massage and other manual techniques to break down scar tissue around injuries and seemed to rely on equipment, like ultrasound, instead. The osteopathic approach usually seemed to work best for the lower leg injuries I experienced.
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Old Fartbag wrote:
@Awdbugga, That is exactly why I made the comment earlier in the thread, about getting a scan and medical intervention if the problem continues. All these people are fine for an acute problem, not a chronic one, with a more sinister underlying cause.

I went through the same as you and it took me far too long to do the right thing....had injections, but only surgery worked. Atm. I'm worried that I've upset my lower back again.....so am doing gentle rehab type exercises and hoping for the best. Skiing in Jan will be the Acid Test.


Ditto. I aggravated my back a few months ago, trying to get fit for the Birthday Bash, and had a flare up of sciatica. Nowhere near as bad as before and the cause was different. Thankfully it seems to have settled down. Hope yours settles down before January for you.
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 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
@ralphster, when you say "...ping. my lower back went", do you mean you were feeling flexible and suddenly you became stiff and painful in the back?

If that is the case, then 4 weeks should be more than adequate to recover. Initially, there is not very much you can do about it, than let your body heal the twang you did by overdoing it. So rest, perhaps some ice, and maybe some compression. I personally rarely have any NSAIDS on the basis that I can usually bear the pain, and there is rarely sufficient inflammation to warrant their use. They are not very good for the lining of your gut.

Try using something like this to avoid making it worse (it will provide compression of lower back muscles)

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Adjustable-Neoprene-Double-Pull-Lumbar-Support-Lower-Back-Belt-Brace-Pain-Relief/272559280045?var=571660750995&hash=item3f75cc8fad:m:mqZ9n8ettwVyucEVVxcFsxw

After a few days rest, a trip to the sauna and steam room should help flush blood into the area (assuming you are not completely crippled). If you are unable to walk, or are in extreme pain after a few days rest, with no sign of improvement, best see a GP.

I once had a g/f who did this when gardening. She was lying on the floor in agony, and complaining of a sore back. Not being an expert in these things I called an ambulance, after checking this was necessary. The ambulance came, and she was still lying on the floor. They took her off to A&E and she returned later having been told she had sciatica and was to rest for a week. Now, it could have been anything, as there was no history of this type of reaction to gardening.

What you want to avoid doing, is the action you did when it went ping. FOR A LONG LONG TIME. Find a gentler way of exercising your lower back!
ski holidays     
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
Awdbugga wrote:
Old Fartbag wrote:
@Awdbugga, That is exactly why I made the comment earlier in the thread, about getting a scan and medical intervention if the problem continues. All these people are fine for an acute problem, not a chronic one, with a more sinister underlying cause.

I went through the same as you and it took me far too long to do the right thing....had injections, but only surgery worked. Atm. I'm worried that I've upset my lower back again.....so am doing gentle rehab type exercises and hoping for the best. Skiing in Jan will be the Acid Test.


Ditto. I aggravated my back a few months ago, trying to get fit for the Birthday Bash, and had a flare up of sciatica. Nowhere near as bad as before and the cause was different. Thankfully it seems to have settled down. Hope yours settles down before January for you.

Thank you.

When I read your description of getting your epidural, it reminded me of what I went through, before going for my fusion.

In order to make sure they were fusing the most painful joint (there were potential issues on several levels)...they stuck a Long needle into each of my Lumber Discs (Discogram). The one that caused by far the most pain (L3/L4 with me), was the culprit. There was little in the way of pain management, as they needed the feedback from me. Sticking a needle into a damaged disc, was the most painful thing I have ever experienced.
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
@Old Fartbag,

Ouch! I bet they got the feedback they wanted, loud and clear. Yep, they certainly are painful injections.
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 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Awdbugga wrote:
@Old Fartbag,

Ouch! I bet they got the feedback they wanted, loud and clear. Yep, they certainly are painful injections.

They got feedback, all right. Toofy Grin
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Bigtipper wrote:
The ambulance came, and she was still lying on the floor. They took her off to A&E and she returned later having been told she had sciatica and was to rest for a week. Now, it could have been anything, as there was no history of this type of reaction to gardening.


Shocked there's gullible . . . then there's Bigtipper rolling eyes
ski holidays     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
The only exercise you need to do to be able to ski to a reasonable standard is cycling. Or swimming. Simples.
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
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Once better I'd also look into work to improve your hip flexibility. The more fluidly you move at the hip, the less strain on the lower back. If like many of use you drive a desk every day, its likely you'll could have inactive glutes and tight hip flexors/piriformis/IT band, all of which can contribute to lower back problems.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
[quote="fullenglish] If like many of use you drive a desk every day, its likely you'll could have inactive glutes and tight hip flexors/piriformis/IT band, all of which can contribute to lower back problems.[/quote]

Too right!
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 You'll need to Register first of course.
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fullenglish wrote:
Once better I'd also look into work to improve your hip flexibility. The more fluidly you move at the hip, the less strain on the lower back. If like many of use you drive a desk every day, its likely you'll could have inactive glutes and tight hip flexors/piriformis/IT band, all of which can contribute to lower back problems.

Fully agree....and I'd include Iliopsoas/Quads and Hamstrings.

It is worth finding out which are the tightest and work on those the most.....through stretching/foam roller/tennis ball.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
@ralphster -- prob no help now, but when you are unbroken again include some Yoga or Pilates in your training schedule. It'll even improve your skiing Very Happy
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
There is a good book out there by a New Zealand guy called 'Treat your own back' . It has helped me a great deal. I do a few simple exercises when I feel any back pain starting and it drives it away. Well worth taking a look at.
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