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Buying a monoski - advice

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Hello all!

Have lurked a few times on the forum but finally signed up as a user. Very Happy Have sitskied 4 times now and absolutely love it. Fed up though of the palavar of sorting out hiring a sitski so now want to see about buying my own. I saw that unfortunately have missed the opportunity to try out some kit in August. Am thinking of getting either a Tessier Leisure monoski or a Scarver monoski... Does anyone know if there is any chance I could try these out in the UK or will I have to arrange something with the Tessier guys when I'm next skiing out in Europe (hopefully La Plagne in Feb 2012 - yippee!)?

Ta
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Contact Dom at Active Therapy www.activetherapy.eu He's in the UK at the moment with kit for people to try out.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Hi Flipandburn33,

I am in the same position as you started skiing two months ago with Kiera at braehead. Now I am desperate to buy my own rig need to ski more. I started on an Freedom Factory RCP, now using an Praschberger Mono which is a much better rig. Have been emailing Dom with regards to trying a Tessier Scarver are you looking to race or leisure ski?

Would be good if we could get some info from seasoned skiers both race and leisure skiers with a better insight into these skis. I was looking into buying a Prash mono as it seems you can upgrade to a race set up later on. The best bit of advice I have been given by Kiera and Fiona Young is to try and get a shot of each type to see what suits your style best.

Dom is very helpful and answers email quickly, will be in contact with him next week hopefully. All the best, skiing its the best thing that I have done since my accident cant wait to get on the slopes.

Cheers

Graeme
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 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
I might just count as a seasoned skier.
You really want to try a variety of skis before buying. Dom does sessions where you can try out Tessier but remember he is the rep selling them in the uk so it is in his interest to sell you one. It might be that the tessier is the right choise for you but there are other skis available.

If i was after a comfortable "armchair" type ski to ski in then i might buy a tessier. The pros are it has a comfortable armchair type seat, the cons its heavy, i have to get my kit in and out the car and its too heavy. Also you sit very high, good for skiing, hard to get yourself off the floor, riggers, did not like the ones tessier make but you can get superlite who make the other ones make ones for the tessier that are a little longer than starndard ones.

Other options are the praschberg, there should be a few of these about second hand shortly as everyone seems to be moving over to the nissen (japanese rig). Other options include the HOC.

Ontop of all of this there is getting the right shock, getting it set up for you and getting the right ski and mounted properly.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Hi Flipandburn33, good that you have joined the forum, the more people the better. Getting your own kit is very easy however getting the right one it is not that straight forward.... There is so many things that you have to take into consideration! Equipment that is not suitable to your needs can delay your progress and in some cases make it even impossible! On the other had, getting the right kit will make it a lot easier and you will have fun for many years.
When I am advising to people what equipment to get it takes some time and a lot of questions have to be answered, just a few basic one:

- what is your disability? - people with various disabilities will need different models - different level of spinal cord injury, amputations etc. - some models are more suitable for one disability than others
- beginner or intermediate skier? what do you need it for? holidays with family once or twice a year, skiing in snowdome or racing? 'No need for Ferrari if you are learning to drive or you just drive to supermarket to get your shopping once a week' Wink
- how old are you?
-.......
This just a few basic questions and I can go for longer but it is not the case.

It is not true that I am only Tessier rep. My main thing is being a ski instructor and adaptive ski instructor (I am a physio and instructor in other few sport disciplines). I work with Tessier and Praschbereger and products from those 2 manufacturers I am happy to recommend to my skiers. It is equipment that I am currently using during my lessons and ski camps. I ski in it as well and have great feedback from people I teach who had a chance to skied in other models before. During my many years of instructing I have been working with nearly every sit ski on the market. Some of the models I came across were just shocking! Design, practicality, skiers comfort, quality were very poor. I have seen many skiers as well skiing in a equipment that was limiting their progress and making skiing hard work coz of bad recommendation/research.

Nearly as many skiers you will get as many different opinions, it is very good to find out what other people think but ask why do they think so and always be open for other opinions. As I said earlier, if somone is saying that his model is the best it doesnt mean that it will be the best for you too(different disability, age, what you need it for etc...)! There are always advantages and disadvantages of one or the other but what will work for you the best?

Eg. ajl338 doesnt like Tessier outriggers, you will have hundred of people who love them and think they are the best design ever.... (during my lessons I use superlite for teaching, but as to buy your own (if regarding disability you could get ether) I would more likely recommend Tessier outriggers - which I can explain why.

Keep asking, keep trying different kit and I am sure you will find something suitable. If you would like any more info regarding what model would suit your needs please write some more info about yourself. You can always email me as well on dom@activetherapy.eu

Hope you have found it a bit useful.

Keep it skiing!
Dom
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You'll need to Register first of course.
Hi ajl338,

Some very good points put across by yourself. I have spent many a hour on the computer trying to find information about different sit ski rigs, it seams you need to be in the loop to get info about certain rigs.

As my plans are to get into racing and also leisure I am aiming mainly at racing rigs. It would be a good idea for me to buy a second hand rig for my first season then hopefully progress as the seasons go by. The problem lies in getting a second hand one which would work out cost effective ie: suits my body I'm 6ft 2in and T8 complete para. Luckily I have long arms.

I have found information on,

Praschberg - http://www.praschberger.com/en

Freedom Factory - http://www.freedomfactory.org/

Tessier - http://www.dualski.com/en/scarver/

HOC - http://www.teamhoc.com/pages/monoski.html

Nissin - http://www.colourswheelchair.com/products/prod_torinoSki.htm

Started out on the Freedom Factory RCP it did the job got me into skiing but I didn't like the way I sat on the ski not in it plus it didn't fit very well.

Now using a Prasch that Kiera begged for me to get a shot of big thanks to Kiera Young(Adaptive instructor Scotland Central) as I don't think I would have progressed as quick as I hope I have without it. Huge difference I feel part of the ski rig which makes skiing much more controlled and comfortable most importantly enjoyable. Though some times it may not look it I just strive for getting everything bang on.

Will try and get a try of a Tessier Scarver although as you say apparently most of the racers are going Nissin now but finding out it weighs in at 17kg puts me off big time, as getting it in and out of the car would require my engine hoist. The HOC is a very nice looking ski but I am unsure how I would feel with my knees being unsupported like the other skis in the way they can flex with the suspension. I have heard and looked for info regarding Kevin Brambles but all I have found is some videos and pics on the net, I know someone with one but he plays tennis at GB level so has not been home much since I took up skiing. Outrigger can be had from Superlite, Tessier and HOC as you say its all down to personal tastes and what works for youself.

As you can see I have been looking to get the most info I can as I am itching to buy my first rig and get more skiing in. Practice makes perfect. Apologies for the long post just wanting to get the right equipment for the type and level of skiing I am striving to and its a mine field when coming into it as a newbie.

Cheers

Graeme
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Hi all!

Thanks - some really useful stuff here! Dom - I've sent you an email with some more details. Have realised that as a once a year (although would love it to be at the very least twice a year!) skier who is not mad into racing, going for the Scarver would probably be a bit nutty. And yes, will definitely try lots of different kit out.

Cheers

Sylvia
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Sylvia
If i was just going recreational skiing then providing i could work out a way of getting off the floor then i might well buy the tessier as it was very comfortable. If i could have different models for different trips i might have one (wish i could win the lottery)

Just for info there is a charity called impossibledream who are based nr london who have a selection of sitskis that they rent out to people for holidays so if it is just once a year then maybe rent rather than buy?

Sorry Dom i thought you were the tessier rep, if you arent you most certainlly have the biggest tessier ski collectiion in the uk! I just thought i would add superlite did longer riggers as i brought some new ones the other day and the lady i ski with occasionally didnt know you could get them for a tessier
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Hi ajl338, sit ski should be comfortable and should be doing the job at the same time. As I said earlier, instructing people is my main thing. Running adaptive programme which is suitable for people with any disability and any age requires various equipment. As far as I am aware only Tessier has got full range of adaptive equipment which is suitable for people with any disability. The great thing about this is that I can quickly adjust shock absorbers for various skiers, change seats between frames (dualski, mono-ski, kartski...) which makes it cost effective. At the same time, in my opinion, Tessier alongside Prasch. has got great design and good quality etc. Depending on the model can be used by beginners, recreational skiers and racers.

To be honest I would love to have a massive storage next to the slope in ski resort with all models from different manufacturers, various sizes of seats etc. for people to ski and try which they prefer the most. I am working on it, however if I wont win the lottery it might take me a few years to have a set up like this.....

Regards, Dom
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that is the difference between a rental piece of kit and a personal one. Between one item does a lot of jobs ok or one job only but very well.
There is a lot of arguement for learning what works for you but once it is good then i dont need to change things. To be honest its easy to adjust my car seat but after the first few months i havent touched it for about 3 years.

i agree about ideally comfort and style but you dont get F1 race cars with air con and heated back seats, the reason being they choose to compromise comfort for weight and racing is like that aswell. Id rather have a better shock that a heavy comfortable seat. ITs all a trade off but the new nissen is fairly adaptable. I'm looking forward to have a go in one at some point as its so totally differnt from anything else i have seen

8 days until the snow!
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snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
[quote="ajl338"]that is the difference between a rental piece of kit and a personal one. Between one item does a lot of jobs ok or one job only but very well. - I do agree with you on this one thats why I use full range of adaptive equipment which is suitable for people with any disability and not only one model for everyone. To make it even better I use various sizes of seats and adjusting shocks which are suitable to their disability, weight as well as skiing ability.

There is a lot of arguement for learning what works for you but once it is good then i dont need to change things. To be honest its easy to adjust my car seat but after the first few months i havent touched it for about 3 years. - I wouldn't agree on this one and as soon as you will start spending some time with the race team you will find out that your equipment needs adjusting constantly through your skiing career (if you are thinking seriously about going into racing) as your technique developes and changing all the time, whatever set up - position, shock etc you had year ago, you exlpore that you performance will improve by changing it a bit that will work on you better - individual adjustments that will work only on you, thats what you prefer and works on you.

i agree about ideally comfort and style but you dont get F1 race cars with air con and heated back seats, the reason being they choose to compromise comfort for weight and racing is like that aswell. Id rather have a better shock that a heavy comfortable seat. - Ideally equipment should tick as many boxes as possible. You can have both - comfortable seat and great shock it perfectly fine work together. Having not comfortable position and seat there is a big chance thet you wont be having great results - it will might create pressure points, blisters, in some cases increased spasms which will definately slow down your progression and performance. As alpine skiing is a gravity sport I wouldn't say that extra 1 kg of equipment weight will make a difference - regular beginner skis are much lighter that race skis - there is far more technology involved in it and there is no need to try to make things lighter. The only difference is when getting the kit out of the car or carrying to the slope.

Regards, Dom
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 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Hello All,

I see a lot of talk and advice about what to consider when choosing a MonoSki. I just purchased a RPC-SS (Revolution Pro Comp SS) and I'm looking for advice on how to best choose what size and style Ski to mount underneath the rig. Any and all advice would be appreciated!
Thanks a bunch
-Aaron
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So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
@M@mmoth, That depends... A ski works the same under a monoski as it does for stand up skiers, so think about what kind of skier you are and decide on what kind of skiing you are likely to do - piste cruising, piste performance skiing, off piste, park etc. etc. - and go from there.
The combined weight of you and the monoski should be taken into consideration. You may want to look at skis that are a little stiffer. For example, if you're a beginner, a soft beginner ski may be too soft when you factor the weight of the monoski too.
Something to be aware of is the binding. If your monoski has a "foot" that fits alpine bindings you need to make sure you get a binding with a high DIN or find some way to lock it out. You don't want to be falling out of your binding whilst skiing - without a ski you and the monoski will roll and after you've stopped snowballing it's really difficult to get a ski back on, on snow.
Try contacting Sean Rose at Seated Sports http://www.seatedsports.com/online-shop He sells ski and binding packages especially for monoskis.
I hope that helps.
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 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
@SaraJ, Thanks for the advice. I'll be primarily riding on groomed runs in Northern California. I was also told a giant slalom or all terrain ski would best for their stiffness. i'll make sure the DIM as high as possible if i cannot lock it.

Has anyone ridden the RPC-SS before? i know a lot of people learn to ride on the RPC but the SS is a newer model designed for more speed and downhill riding. I just bought a new one and i'm curious if anyone has any experience riding the SS or at the very least seen it in action.
Cheers
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 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Looking to replace my Snowshark mountain gun with something marginally slower to accommodate my ageing knees. Does anyone have a powdershark monoski made by snowshark or have any other recommendations? Thanks.
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