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First skis - bindings?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
I'm going to buy some skis for the first time, i know what skis i want but i have no idea what the differences with bindings are? Benefits / Challenges / differences, skis are a bit of an all mountain job (Rossi Experience 88's) does it make a difference to what bindings you use for the ski?

Not a tourer so don't need any heal release or anything, just a 'standard' binding. But tbh i've no idea what that actually means, any advice would be greatly appreciated!
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
The main considerations are a) ski/brake width, b) DIN range, c) boot compatibility.

You'd want a 90mm brake. If you don't know your DIN google DIN calculator.

Boot sole compatibility is a bit of a minefield at the moment. If you have a standard alpine boot, the sole will confirm to ISO 5355 and will fit in all bindings (apart from AT 'pin' bindings, obviously). If you have a touring type boot, or one with a 'walk to ride' (WTR) sole, then you need to pay more attention to compatibility. See article below.

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/skiing-101-at-boots-bindings
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Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Themasterpiece wrote:


If you don't know your DIN google DIN calculator.


If you do that check multiple sites to get a consensus. dinsetting.com in particular was noted on here as having some serious errors - so avoid that site.
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Tubaski wrote:
Themasterpiece wrote:


If you don't know your DIN google DIN calculator.


If you do that check multiple sites to get a consensus. dinsetting.com in particular was noted on here as having some serious errors - so avoid that site.


I currently set at 9
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Don't they come with bindings?

Not stupid, very often packaged.
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under a new name wrote:
Don't they come with bindings?

Not stupid, very often packaged.


Yep, and a DIN of 9 sounds high unless you're heavy and/or expert.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Tom Doc wrote:
under a new name wrote:
Don't they come with bindings?

Not stupid, very often packaged.


Yep, and a DIN of 9 sounds high unless you're heavy and/or expert.


You can get them with or without, but really having no clue i thought asking was a good place to start!
Madeye-Smiley

DIN wise, i found that i kept getting ejected in bumps and sometimes when landing little jumps, i'm around 85kg's relativly fit. 9 seemed to make sense, certainly not an expert, experts i've come across had had settings like 14 @75kgs. What do you run yours at?
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After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Levi215 wrote:

DIN wise, i found that i kept getting ejected in bumps and sometimes when landing little jumps, i'm around 85kg's relativly fit. 9 seemed to make sense, certainly not an expert, experts i've come across had had settings like 14 @75kgs. What do you run yours at?


It depends on height, weight and boot sole length combined (and also whether you are aged under or over 50) - so not usually a good idea to go comparing DINs with other people. Especially when there are people who consider how high their DIN setting is as some indicator of how good a skiier they are - these are not the people to take DIN setting advice from Shocked
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Tubaski wrote:
Levi215 wrote:

DIN wise, i found that i kept getting ejected in bumps and sometimes when landing little jumps, i'm around 85kg's relativly fit. 9 seemed to make sense, certainly not an expert, experts i've come across had had settings like 14 @75kgs. What do you run yours at?


It depends on height, weight and boot sole length combined (and also whether you are aged under or over 50) - so not usually a good idea to go comparing DINs with other people. Especially when there are people who consider how high their DIN setting is as some indicator of how good a skiier they are - these are not the people to take DIN setting advice from Shocked


Smile Just asking, i wasn't going to change them based on some off the cuff comment on here, interestingly the top 5 results on google average just below 9...
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
I am notoriously not for recommending brand regarding most equipment many times as same - a given brand - is essentially "equal", here and there............. Not so in bindings. I unhesitatingly and intransigently always recommend Look TT (pivot) where the ability to choose and mount a binding is concerned.

A (Look) TT binding is the most natural in lateral release, period. Once you "see" this, you'll understand. No other system comes close as only a TT system laterally releases concentrically on the center axis of your leg. This IS a real biggy. Look TT have the highest elasticity of any binding out there and the design, while refined over five plus decades has remained unchanged from an engineering basis. That speaks volumes. Two additional biggies. They are the easiest to get into, especially in deep snow as, if need be, the skier has the ability to rotate the heel unit by hand where little resistance beneath the ski is the case. This is not to be overlooked should one have to put a ski back on following release on a slope and soft/powder snow is the case, or even in firm consitions as any of you should know.
Another benefit of Look TT is the ease by which one can attach powder cord (neon surveyor tape) to the rear unlike most other traditional heel units.

Look TT systems are such with the aforementioned high(est) elasticity where one has the ability if they would care to reduce the ISO/DIN setting as per such incredibly high elasticity. E.G., I should be at a 9 but for years and years and years and then some have set mine to 7 - 6.5 which appropriates all the resistance I would ever need but serves as easier release if and when the worst (lateral release) need comes into play...........; the "slow twister" where load/torque builds up over a longer period of time on joint and bone as any orthopedic will acknowledge, the most potentially injurious fall one can take. Hate to say it, but if you ever take a tumble may it be v. fast precipitating v. quick release.
Look TT come in several ISO/DIN ranges and if you intelligently take my rare advice I recommend making certainly that you do not select a model whose ISO/DIN is higher than you need. Mechanically they are all the same, the only difference is the spring.

Keep your boots as clean and fresh as possible and here's a tip that most scoff at........... I have worn a (compressible) rucksack/mini backpack for over forty years that accommodates my boots....... just........, in addition to a second set of goggles, a second set of gloves (that I always switch out to midday), sometimes on a given storm day a balaclava if need be, an accessible outside pocket for keys, wallet, lip balm, sunscreen, powder cord, a Glock 19, etc........... I walk in tennis shoes to the lift and at the lift THEN change out into the boots, place my shoes in the backpack and compress it down to nuthin' and I'm off for the day. Then, at the end of the day when I'm back down, I switch out to my comfortable, non Frankenstein tennis shoes and my legs thank me for it, as well my boots that are essentially never subject to walking on ground and the integrity of the boot, both outside and inside is not compromised. I get the boots out of the backpack ASAP, wad several pages of balled up newspaper inside from the toes on up for three hours then pull out which does wonders in absorbing perspiration and then leave open to further air out. In the A.M., the fresh-as-a-daisy boots are placed into the backpack for another day of skiing along with the other items.
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Levi215 wrote:
[
DIN wise, i found that i kept getting ejected in bumps and sometimes when landing little jumps, i'm around 85kg's relativly fit. 9 seemed to make sense, certainly not an expert, experts i've come across had had settings like 14 @75kgs. What do you run yours at?


I don't want to run the thread off topic, but DIN release value is only one factor in how your skis release. You can have a high DIN setting and still pre-release easily if your bindings are incorrectly spaced for your boots. (Likewise you can have a low DIN setting and not release at all if the spacing is wrong in the other direction).

Your heel bindings should have a forward pressure indicator - learn how to use it. If there's insufficient forward pressure, dialling up the DIN value will help but it could still be less than it should be.

IMHO, you're either better than you think you are or a DIN setting of 9 at 85kgs is a little on the high side.
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And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
@dp, +1.

@Levi215, as long as the binding fits the ski, to my mind there is little between them in performance. Cheaper and lower DIN models may have more plastic.

Otherwise, colour is of course, paramount.
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