Ski Club 2.0 Home
Snow Reports
FAQFAQ

Mail for help.Help!!

Log in to snowHeads to make it MUCH better!
Username:-
 Password:
Remember me:
durr, I forgot...
Or Register
(to be a proper snow-head, all official-like!)

To buy or not to buy?

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Apart from the fun of choosing a new piece of kit, is it worth buying your own board? And if so, at what point?

Background:
With 4 weeks under my belt, I'm developing an idea of what I like (or more specifically, what I don't like) and starting to eye shiny new boards.

UK based, expected 1-2 weeks per year, flying to the normal European resorts.

Confident on all types of runs, barring ice, but with varying degrees of style Very Happy

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts and experiences.
snow report     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Buy the shiny.

Which shiny? Well that's another matter...
latest report     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Buy shiny things. Now is a good time if you can find what you want in the sales which are starting up.
snow report     
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
Do it. Bought our own boards after two weeks. Never looked back. Let us know what you buy Very Happy
ski holidays     
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
And there I was hoping you'd talk me out of spending ££££ .. Shiny Very Happy

Now the hard bit starts..
snow conditions     
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Buy. I have had my current 'new' board for, um, 13 years. So it's paid off for me, (average 10 days on the slopes each year, plus the odd trip to the Snowcentre)

Main advantages for me, are :

It's MY kit, kept in good condition, and i know what damage it has/has not sustained.

There's no 'getting used' to the board each time (vs a hire board) - so i can only blame my rusty technique each time i go.

Over time, I am happy i know where to adjust the bindings angles / fore and aft position to suit different conditions - so there is no period of trial and adjustment on a new hire board (which inevitably means i would lose patience, and just go with a setting that wasn't optimium but ok)

I have chosen the board that is right for me, from the wide range available. In resort, you are restricted by what the hire shop has.

It's different with Ski's - i think you can get some very top notch kit on hire. In general, i don't think the same applies with Snowboards - or at least if they do have top end kit, then it's in low volume and may well be out on hire.

Not just board, but own bindings that are suitable for your boots. I have the K2 Cinch bindings, a mix of ratchet straps and easy entry a la Flows.

And as per earlier posters, why wouldn't you want to buy a nice new shiny bit of kit to go with your new found skills?
latest report     
 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Buy, for the same reasons that @Richie_S said - except only buy if you're happy that the baord is really right for you and your style, abilities and where and what you want to do. And also very much what bindings do you want? And have you got your own boots and got them sorted too?
Snowboards come in an amazing variety of types, never mind sidecut and radius - e.g. rocker/camber/hybrid, directional/bit directional/true twin, wide/narrow, bendy as heck/might as well have just used the tree trunk.... And so on. Make sure that you know what these mean (sorry, you may already, of course) and how they affect or limit your riding. (What have you hired to date?) Also make sure that you get the length which you want and which will suit you (and width if big/small feet).
To some extent you'll adapt to your board, but I know that I made the mistake of buying a directional advanced and pretty stiff board - albeit that it had really good reviews - and it didn't do me any favours at all, especially indoors. Certainly would have held back my confidence and skills for a good while if I'd stuck with it. Fortunately it was only 2nd hand, and I'm keeping it for when I get better and want to ride off-piste more. Then I bought a brand new board after having hired the same model, and am very happy with it and my chosen bindings for the time being, at my current very intermediate level; more weeks than you, less confidence, maybe. Maybe will upgrade the baord in future, but for now it's OK as an all-round, twin, medium length, mid-flex play and ride board for the piste and edges. I was going to buy all sorts of other ones which had good reviews, but I had hired this one and liked it a lot so reasoned that at least I knew what I was getting...

And @Richie_S: it's often just as bad - sometimes worse - with skis!
latest report     
 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
You can easily hire "top-notch" snowboards in North America, albeit not for free.

I'd buy a board once you know what you want and why, and in which size, and once you're sure you won't mind carrying, maintaining and riding the same board for several years.
snow report     
 You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
Hey dude.

I'd echo what @Richie_S said... It's great getting straight on a board you're already familiar with and quickly getting back to riding at the level you left off at (and so getting to the point you're improving faster) plus it's fairly satisfying learning how to wax/edge/setup the thing. One forms a bond with an owned board, to the point where you can just sense when some drunken muppet has picked it up in the dark instead of their own board:D


I personally reckon it's a good idea to get something used fairly cheap as a first own board, it's amazing what you can get for 1/5th of the price with only a few weeks use. At least that's what I did and it worked well for me - A few good weeks on my own board taught me a lot about what I'd like my second board, the one I'll be spending proper money on, to be.


Last edited by You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net. on Wed 22-03-17 19:51; edited 1 time in total
ski holidays     
 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
double post...
latest report     
 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
robin_mxx wrote:
Apart from the fun of choosing a new piece of kit, is it worth buying your own board? And if so, at what point?

Background:
With 4 weeks under my belt, I'm developing an idea of what I like (or more specifically, what I don't like) and starting to eye shiny new boards.

UK based, expected 1-2 weeks per year, flying to the normal European resorts.

Confident on all types of runs, barring ice, but with varying degrees of style Very Happy

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts and experiences.


I was in a very similar position to you with a similar(ish) profile (I suspect you are more advanced than me), I'd completely agree with what @Richie_s said. I bought my board from Decathlon (Salomon Pulse with pact bindings) for £170, which feels very different to the rental boards I've used, but for that price it just seemed to good to turn down and seemed to match the type of riding (similar to you) I am expecting to do.

Although carrying a board around can be hassle I love the fact that now I can unpack, grab my kit and go without having to sit in the hire shop for ages...also cost wise, over 2/3 seasons even with luggage costs I think it works out cheaper than renting (depending where you go of course).

So in short...I'd do it!
snow conditions     
 And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
And love to help out and answer questions and of course, read each other's snow reports.
Thanks everyone!

I'm going to treat myself to a board, either one with a few weeks use or a bargain buy. I feel like I don't want to splash out too much when I don't know if I'll like it or not, I'll not have much opportunity for testing before next season.

I've been browsing the threads on people's recommendations, and I'm narrowed down what I want to something directional, good for carving, camber underfoot, with some rocker upfront for float. Something like the Yes Pick Your Line, Jones Flagship, though if I can find something cheaper like that that would be great. Very Happy
snow conditions     
 So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
So if you're just off somewhere snowy come back and post a snow report of your own and we'll all love you very much
There are pros and cons to both. Renting can be great as you can pick a board specific to the conditions and often even swap during the week allowing you to make the most of conditions and what type of snowboarding you want to do. Obviously that is dependent on the rental shop having a decent selection, which may not be the case everywhere.

Quote:
There's no 'getting used' to the board each time (vs a hire board)

Not sure how much i buy this. Unless you are hiring something completely different each time, you should get a feel of it pretty quick. I've seen plenty of people swap boards for a run or 2 and it didn't seem to be problematic. If your only snowboarding 1 or 2 weeks a year there's probably more getting used to being on snow again in general than board imo.

Financially buying does work out cheaper. But may take a few years worth of trips when you factor in maintenance, extra luggage costs etc.

Grizzler makes some good points. Many people end up buying the wrong board and either sticking with it and not having much fun, or having to buy an extra board. 4 weeks snowboarding is not a whole lot in the grand scheme of things. Some of the more advanced boards may be a little too much for you. But if you buy a board at your current level you may outgrow it pretty quick as you continue to progress. I wouldn't want to buy a board without testing it in advance. Maybe worth using next year to try some out before you buy.
ski holidays     
 You know it makes sense.
You know it makes sense.
Yes, it would be great to be able to try different boards at the hire shop, however the choice has been very limited in all the times I've been.

Case in point, on the EOSB a few weeks ago, I ended up with a choice between a rocker board I didn't like, or a long (for me) 162 camber board which I ended up spending the week on! Very Happy
ski holidays     
 Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
boarder2020 wrote:
Quote:
There's no 'getting used' to the board each time (vs a hire board)

Not sure how much i buy this. Unless you are hiring something completely different each time, you should get a feel of it pretty quick. I've seen plenty of people swap boards for a run or 2 and it didn't seem to be problematic. If your only snowboarding 1 or 2 weeks a year there's probably more getting used to being on snow again in general than board imo.


I guess everyone differs, but for me at least there really is an 'ahh, I feel at home again' feeling when going out on my own board the first day of a trip. What ratio of psychological to physical factors makes it the case I don't know, but I certainly find it beneficial. I rented my first day this season (airline temporarily lost my baggage) and while I didn't have a bad time on the rental it really felt great getting back with my familiar board/bindings for day two.
snow conditions     
 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
So, after a few glasses of wine last night, I found a new 2016 Head "The Day" for £143 on eBay, and before I knew it, I'd bought my first board!

This has the potential to be good, or very funny at least!rolling eyes


@jjams82, your board is now safe, this one looks different enough to yours that I won't try and make off with the wrong board in the dark! Smile
snow conditions     
 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
You've got a little more experience on snow than me (with a snowboard at least) but I have my own kit - generally speaking if you're going 2 times a year the cost of your set up, plus transport (or BA my preferred) you'll probably find you're better off cost wise after 3-5 years depending on how extravagant you go. But that board and boots could last you 10 years and I've always found you get used to your kit and know its limits better than hire stuff so you progress at a better rate (previously skied for 12 or so years).
snow conditions     
 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Robin Agogo wrote:
@jjams82, your board is now safe, this one looks different enough to yours that I won't try and make off with the wrong board in the dark! Smile


Good:D
ski holidays     
 You need to Login to know who's really who.
You need to Login to know who's really who.
@spacedDMC, yes, I think I am getting to the point when I want to know my own kit, and I'm finding the limitations of hire kit.

I'm now very much looking forward to getting used to my new setup at the End of Season bash. Saying that, the hire shop in the Oxalys, Val Thorens, had some very usable Nitro Team boards Very Happy
snow report     
 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Quote:


It's different with Ski's - i think you can get some very top notch kit on hire. In general, i don't think the same applies with Snowboards - or at least if they do have top end kit, then it's in low volume and may well be out on hire.



Completely agree. There are some specialist decent snowboard hire shops out there, but not many. Most hire shops you get what you're given with boards and they tend to be awful, floppy, rocker things to flatter beginners. It's quite easy to find a ski hire place with the best of everything, and it makes sense since there are probably more than ten skiers for every boarder in the Alps these days.

Cost varies a lot by airline/tour operator/location/luck but I'm pretty sure owning my own board would is a false economy for my Alps trips, but it pays for itself over my Scottish days. And as above it means I've got something decent Very Happy
ski holidays     
 You'll need to Register first of course.
You'll need to Register first of course.
Jambo wrote:
And as above it means I've got something decent Very Happy


I think that's the real reason I chose to buy in the end Very Happy
snow conditions     



Terms and conditions  Privacy Policy