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Some advice on dry slopes

 Poster: A snowHead
Poster: A snowHead
Hi I was hoping someone with a bit of experience could help, I am planning to go out this season with my girlfriend, she has never skiied before, so I thought of going to a place close to us called we are vertigo where they have dry slopes. I was just wanting to see has anyone ever genuinely went to them before their first time out and are they actually any good for helping?

Thanks
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 Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Definitely good for helping, if only to get the feeling of the boots and the sensation of sliding downhill. And it could save a lot of time and money when out there.
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 Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name, see?
Yeah brilliant - If you're determined enough to learn on a dry slope real snow and mountains are a piece of cake. Course it's a long time for me but I learnt to both ski and board on dryslopes.
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Yeah brilliant - If you're determined enough to learn on a dry slope real snow and mountains are a piece of cake. Course it's a long time for me but I learnt to both ski and board on dryslopes.
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 Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
I learned the basics on our local dryslope; by our first trip (which was a SH Bash) I could turn and use a drag lift. I would 100% recommend doing it that way - you don't waste time and money learning to put skis on and sidestepping up hills when you're paying ££££ per day to be in resort, and if you really, really hate you'll find out ahead of time!
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As others have said dryslopes can be a great place to learn but also to improve. They are generally cheaper than the fridges, so go to the dryslope learn to ski hopefully to a snowplough std or above but then book a lesson before you go out at a fridge, or one when you get there just to get used to the difference between the two.

Dryslopes are slower than snow so your first hurdle will be getting used to the fact you have less friction, this will result in the obvious faster speeds but also even walking up sideways will be slightly different. It will not take long to adjust especially if you are aware there is a difference and take it easy.
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 Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
Then you can post your own questions or snow reports...
I learned to ski on dry slope back in 1987, and I don't think the slope technology has changed that much since. I had 5 one hour lessons, and as others have mentioned, as a minimum she will get the feel of boots, moving around on skis and the basics of sliding, turning and stopping. Probably saves the first couple of days in class 1 in the resort.

I don't recommend that you try and teach her how to ski, and certainly don't take her down any thing steep/ice cover once in the resort. The first time skiing is usually a love/hate it experience. I knew with a couple of days that I would do it for life.
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 After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Like @PowderAdict, many moons ago I had a course of 6 beginner lessons in the weeks leading up to my first ski trip. Really helped my progress on that first week on real snow. I'd recommend it.
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You'll get to see more forums and be part of the best ski club on the net.
I see that We Are Vertigo is not a dry slope as such but the continuous rolling belt type of training slope ( http://wearevertigo.com/ski/ ). I would wholeheartedly recommend a normal dryslope to learn on but have no experience of the continuous rolling slope so wouldn't wish to comment on that. However there are snowheads that have used them and perhaps they may see this and share their experience.
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 Ski the Net with snowHeads
Ski the Net with snowHeads
Also, perhaps the title can be edited to clarify the type of slope.
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 snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
snowHeads are a friendly bunch.
Back in 1984 I learnt to ski on a dry slope and had lessons beyond beginner level before my first trip on snow. The first day on snow was a surprise, it was a lot faster and had bumps on it Smile By the end of the week I was skiing quite well, not parallel and still unsure on bumps and ice.

I looked up 'We are vertigo' and it looks like the same idea as Skiplex. Do a search on Skiplex and read the somewhat mixed reviews of it's applicability. I've tried it and think it's probably a good idea for a complete beginner, not as good as a proper dry slope or a fridge but better than nothing at all but don't expect her to find the beginner class on snow a complete doddle.
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