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Poster: A snowHead
Thu 24-05-18 9:45
Replies: 44
Turkey, Greece, Croatia - all good. Though I gather Croatia can be expensive these days (it wasn't when we went, but that was yonks ago). Just for reference we've had three holidays in Croatia and are going to Greece this summer. Greece is working out about 20% more expensive (one week in a villa, one week on a flotilla). Don't know about eating costs yet
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Thu 17-05-18 9:24
Replies: 107
Now this might upset those who think skidding is a crime so maybe add a bit of deliberate action into the mix to distinguish a slash from a skid & maybe a bit more energy. No good skier thinks that deliberate skidding is a crime, do they? It's one of the skills to blend in. It's all about intent. Of course if you skid because you aren't ABLE to hold an edge that is a different issue :D
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Thu 17-05-18 9:21
Replies: 44
@Boris, Any interest in learning to sail? Flotilla holidays can be great fun with teens - sailing is pretty active, swimming off a boat is wonderful (much better than a beach), the boys will learn some skills that might open up future adventures. You get great time as a family during the day then get to socialise a bit with the rest of the flotilla in the evenings. Likely to be other teens around. If you don't sail at the moment there are three possible routes: 1. do some RYA qualifications (weekends or week) in the UK 2. do a week shorebased in Greece of Croatia followed by a week on a flotilla 3. learn onboard with a skipper. You get taught, assessed and examined at the end of the week and then would be able to skipper a boat on a future trip
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Wed 16-05-18 9:41
Replies: 107
I thought it was kind of a "power slide" - pivot into an exaggerated drift
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Wed 16-05-18 9:36
Replies: 18
I was relatively new to powder (still feels new 7 years later!) and fell on the pitch, ski popped and I slid about 30-50 ft below where the ski came to rest. The instructor was about half a mile away, waiting with the group after the pitch as I wondered "How the ---k am I getting out of here !! ?? Skis are too high up and the pitch is too steep to climb back up " TBH if you ski off piste you have to be ready (self-sufficient) to deal with this situation. Even if you are skiing with a pro they will be in front and certainly not expecting to climb back up the hill to retrieve a client's ski unless its a really extreme situation (injury etc.).
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Wed 9-05-18 13:16
Replies: 118
Yep, that was definitely where I was going when I posted it. Agreed. And I'd go further - assessing the terrain and the risk is MUCH MORE IMPORTANT than carrying the gear (even if you know how to use it). If you need the gear then you have already royally screwed things up. That is not an argument for not having gear of course. But if someone dies in an avalanche the biggest lessons are likely to be about the the decisions where and when they skied.
Well, it's only polite to Register
Tue 8-05-18 14:31
Replies: 118
@dp, That may be true but have you also seen the evidence that suggests that expertise in off piste safety does not protect you? The reason is that experts tend to put themselves at risk much more often. They are out there more often doing more challenging things and the net result is that there skills get offset by the volume and nature of exposure they take on. Other people have challenged whether ski instructors make sensible risk assessments when they take people off piste without gear and training. I don't have good data on this so don't know for sure. My sense though is that ski instructors take clients off piste a lot and that there are relatively few fatalities. If this wasn't true then I'd imagine the profession would be getting sued a lot and their professional insurance would be getting unaffordable. I'm conflicted about this. My kids were taken off piste a lot by one of their ski instructors. Including in areas where I personally would not have gone without all the gear. This was a factor in discontinuing lessons for them. However, when I discussed off piste safety with him - asking his opinion on certain routes etc. I always found that he was well informed and sensible, including dissuading me from skiing in some areas and favouring the areas he believed to be low risk - guess what, the places he took my kids. And it is only recently that my kids have started wearing transceivers even though I have been taking them off piste for years, albeit in areas that were even lower risk than the ones their instructor took them on. My personal view is that the idea that as soon as you go outside the piste markers you are at high risk and need all the gear is not based on any credible risk assessment - instead it is very well-intentioned propaganda aimed at people who haven't yet learned much about avalanche risk. It is a simple rule of thumb which like all simple rules of thumb is not always true.
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Tue 8-05-18 10:15
Replies: 118
in March someone posted on one of the FB pages something along the lines of "I've got no avalanche kit or anyone to go off piste with, so where is safe off piste that I can go and try?" Luckily, a lot of people posted that currently no where was 'safe' and it was stupid to go off piste alone and without kit Just on this: a) ski instructors take clients off piste without avalanche gear - they do so because they know that there ARE safe places to ski b) however if you have to ask the question "where is safe?" you are proving that you don't have the knowledge to ski safely off piste.
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Tue 8-05-18 10:11
Replies: 118
I have this in my rucsac - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Avalanche-Pocket-Guide-Field-Reference/dp/1594857199/ref=la_B001KMDS4M_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1525770561&sr=1-3 Basically it is Bruce Tremper's equivalent of what dp has created for himself (although it is a fold out and has a bit more information on it).
And post your own questions...
Fri 4-05-18 16:47
Replies: 118
When I worked a season in 1993/4 no one carried avi gear. When I say no one I don't just mean my fellow seasonaires, you really never saw anyone skiing with a rucsac. But then no one wore seatbelts in the back of cars when I was a kid. They weren't even fitted until, when, 80s? Of course you should carry the kit off piste. Probably even more important than that is not going into to areas of know avalanche risk under avalanche conditions.
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Fri 4-05-18 10:02
Replies: 172
@kedsky, Hoji weighs about 50kg and moves like a cat. Not sure how his use of bindings is relevant for someone like me who weighs 90kg+ and moves like an octopus falling out of a tree ha! :lol: it's a fair point though
And they're a friendly bunch.
Fri 4-05-18 9:50
Replies: 55
@BobinCH, Bloody hell - quite a year for the medics! Get well soon!!!
You know it makes sense.
Tue 1-05-18 18:47
Replies: 172
And one final comment on the ski touring tribes, you will often find that the median age of those doing hut to huts is circa 50 maybe more - and the guides are often nearing that age or over too, but in the past they've done the gnar. I'm sure you are right but at the Conscrits there were loads of younger people mainly in their 30s I'd say but there were two younger women from the guides school in Chamonix who were on ultra light kit and came past us at a rate of knots on the way up. In general I felt slow, old and pretty incompetent on the way up but one of the stronger skiers on the way down which rather surprised me (the latter not the former!).
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Tue 1-05-18 16:27
Replies: 172
Fitting with the trend I saw outside the huts on the Imperial Haute route last week. I'd say the average ski was even narrower- the most popular ski by far was the BC Orb Freebird (which I have a pair of and like a lot)- and most bindings were Plums or brakeless dynafits, maybe one pair of Kingpins all week. I've said it before but when I was up at the Conscrits hut last year my R108 186cm with Beast 14s were the biggest/burliest set up of any of the 50 pairs there. Typical skis would be 88mm and <180cm width with some fixed toe dynafits of some description. And for good reason.
Poster: A snowHead
Tue 1-05-18 16:23
Replies: 172
had the all time classic Diamir FreeRides which my OH still occasionally uses and or we loan to people wanting to give touring a go. yeah I still have a pair of skis with those on in our cave for exactly the same reason.
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Tue 1-05-18 16:20
Replies: 172
@Arno, I risk the ire of weathercam and take 1 pair of beasts and 2 pairs of quiverkillered skis to La Grave on my annual trip. It doesnít cover all bases perfectly but it covers most bases adequately, given the type of skiing we usually end up doing. Could of sworn that in the past you made a very persuasive argument that the right compromise was skis quiver-killered for both (Say) Marker Tour and a lightweight pin and that Beasts were neither one thing or another plus unreasonably costly! I suppose given how cheap you could get beasts as they went out of production they started to get very competitive with frame bindings? I have beast 14 which work well on big skis for day tours/sidecountry/general off piste when you might want to skin out of conditions get iffy but I would not recommend for big hut to hut trips (they work but are far from optimal). They also ski like an alpine binding on piste if that matters. Overall though they are a freeride binding you can skin on more than a touring binding.
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Tue 1-05-18 13:29
Replies: 45
Discovered Sestriere as an excellent place for tree-skiing during a retour d'est. I've been saying that around these parts for a few years. Brilliant isn't it?
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Tue 1-05-18 11:02
Replies: 40
Someone else mentioned Whitedot Directors. The Directors are more rockered compared to the trad camber of the R.98s. it all comes down to preference but get down to Echo Base in La Praz and try the Whitedot range that was me but I meant Preachers :oops:
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Mon 30-04-18 15:03
Replies: 8
If you want easy access Iíd probably go with 3Vs Yes - I once heard a Swiss (!) ski instructor describe the 3V as the "best off piste playground" in the world. He wasn't saying it was the best off piste in the world just that the quantity and quality of easily accessible off piste without the serious navigation and mountain safety challenges of - say, Argentiere/St Anton/Engleberg was remarkable. I'd say that was fair comment. It has plenty of high skiing too.
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Mon 30-04-18 14:58
Replies: 45
Les Contamines got 925cm at 1880m this year. Second best in a decade. 5th best in 22 years. What that probably understates was the frequency of snowfalls which meant so many days skiing fresh powder. I skied 25 days (including 2 at St Gervais) and had 8 true fresh powder days. And of course plenty of others when there were fresh tracks to be had. Not shabby. What did go missing was sunshine (friend of ours who lives in Les C said he had burned twice as much wood as usual without the solar gain from sunshine) and ski touring. Oh and one great area for off piste was closed for the whole season due to avalanche risk. Have to take the rough with the smooth. Didn't have a single day when I felt the lifts or pistes were really busy and that included NY, Feb HT and first Easter week. Yet another year when I didn't manage to get to Chamonix. Would have been over for ski touring if the weather had allowed.
Well, it's only polite to Register
Fri 27-04-18 12:29
Replies: 40
Think your shortlist is pretty good and the one you like of those will do you fine for everything you want to do. I suspect the right Whitedot to consider is the Director probably want the extra sidecut over a R98 that would be another option.
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Fri 27-04-18 9:56
Replies: 175
@Alastair, Do you honestly think that descending the hill UANN describes in a heavy car like a range rover in snow is ever acceptable on summer tyres? 4wd does nothing for you in those circumstances. The weight does lots against you. The wide tyres are unhelpful too. Are you SERIOUSLY saying that the lack of proper tyres wasn't a massive part of this incident? UANN shouldn't have called you a d1ck but your posts on this thread certainly make you look like one (in the sense of having a massive superiority complex).
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Wed 25-04-18 19:09
Replies: 46
^This, but I really made up for it since! In fairness I was building a decent career at that point in life, which has enabled me to ski a lot more often in the last couple of decades. One of my best ski mates did the opposite (he skied 100 days+ a season in his 20s) and now (only slightly!) regrets not going to uni and having a professional career. We joked about it on the chair this season as we both ended up in the same place from completely different ends of the spectrum. Good point! I worked one season then focused on my career but without changing that could have got more skiing done just by prioritising that over saving and general socialising at weekends
And post your own questions...
Wed 25-04-18 13:57
Replies: 220
But the OP and I suspect the far majority of people start off dabbling of the side of the piste in Europe. Ideally they will still be in the relatively early stages of their progression in on piste or general skiing. It's never too early to start dabbling IMO. Totally and they should feel free to do that on 80mm skis too. My kids started skiing off piste on junior FIS SLs. At Easter my friend's daughter - a 14 year old, 5 week skier who is strong and athletic (no lightweight - 55kg I think) was on skis with a 68mm waist and spent whole days skiing off piste with us in 30cm of fresh. Yes she was underskied. Definitely. Yes she'd have done better on something fatter. But she had great fun and learned a lot. Of the 3 adults and 3 children who were having a whale of a time in the powder only one of us (me) was on something >100mm. Others would have been 68/78/80/92/96. Don't get me wrong - I really like skiing powder on fat skis but let's not give people the impression that only "experts" can have fun in the powder on <100mm.
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Wed 25-04-18 13:54
Replies: 220
But the OP and I suspect the far majority of people start off dabbling of the side of the piste in Europe. Ideally they will still be in the relatively early stages of their progression in on piste or general skiing. It's never too early to start dabbling IMO. Yes and they should feel free to do that on 80mm skis too. My kids started skiing off piste on kids race SLs. At Easter my friend's daughter - a 14 year old, 5 week skier who is strong and athletic (no lightweight - 55kg I think) was on skis with a 68mm waist and spent whole days skiing off piste with us in 30cm of fresh. Yes she was underskied. Definitely. Yes she'd have done better on something fatter. But she had great fun and learned a lot. Of the 3 adults and 3 children who were having a whale of a time in the powder only one of us (me) was on something >100mm. Others would have been 68/78/80/92/96. Don't get me wrong - I really like skiing powder on fat skis but let's not give people the impression that only "experts" can have fun in the powder on <100mm.
And they're a friendly bunch.
Wed 25-04-18 13:43
Replies: 8
I think the salomons would be ideal TBH
You know it makes sense.
Wed 25-04-18 13:41
Replies: 46
I'd have skied more often in my mid-20s to early 30s prekids. It would have been a stretch financially but I could have done cheap seasonal let and weekend skiing for some of that period. My mortgage would be a bit bigger now but it would have been worth it. I'd have also started ski touring then.
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Wed 25-04-18 13:36
Replies: 220
truly all mountain (which for a reasonably sized adult male is now around or over 100mm) what does "truly all mountain" mean? Loads of people ski the whole mountain really nicely on skinnier skis than that. I'd hate people to think they have to stick to the pistes if they have less than 100mm underfoot.
Poster: A snowHead
Wed 25-04-18 10:19
Replies: 220
@jedster, I only ski pistes to get to other stuff by choice so ok itís a compromise I guess but Iíd prefer to be on wider less railed skis on piste than be flailing about in the powder on a pair of race skis. Iím not about to open the age old debate of one over the other suffice to say you choose your weapon at daybreak and live with it. Iíve never in all the years of skiing felt the need or wanted to ski a dedicated race or carver ski. Each to their own, itís a personal choice. Yeah I take my more pisty skis out when I know the off piste is well and truly skied out and/or the conditions on piste are nicer than the ones off piste. Powder days are the best part of skiing but when the off piste is a bit meh linking short carves on a hard piste is very satisfying (and more challenging really). I had an afternoon in April when the wind had closed a bunch of high lifts, the avalanche risk was 4 and it had rained at lower altitude. ESF left the gates in on the piste they use for race training after their lessons had finished. Spent the afternoon hammering the gates and as someone who has never raced I have to say it was great fun and a good technical challenge. Would have been much less rewarding on soft snow skis
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Tue 24-04-18 18:15
Replies: 220
@kitenski, Ski the 118mm WD Ragnarok CL and get back to me on that one...... its my one ski quiver this last 2 seasons, the 108's haven't even seen the outside of the garage never mind the airport. As you know I don't do sub-100 and don't feel to be struggling on pistes hard-pack or icy Of course you can ski them on piste but if you cant ski a firm piste much better on a piste ski then you are doing something wrong!
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Tue 24-04-18 14:32
Replies: 220
Wailers? Soul 7ís? Or actually probably better would be Faction 3.0ís - very popular with the park rats here. Off piste lesson 1 should be a showing of Candide in ďone of those daysĒ My kids will get a pair of wailers when they raise the money to pay for their own :D :D My sense on kids skis is that most of us are unlikely to be buying them a "quiver" and often their low weight (not if you have a 17 year old second row natch!) actually makes a one ski quiver more viable. Also they are likely improving their technique more rapidly than their parents so need a tool for that too. All of which means that something at the narrow end of freeride with a bit of side cut makes more sense than an out and out powder ski. For those reasons I would buy something similar but a bit narrower than all the skis you suggest. If we are talking about renting for a powder day then your suggestions look bang on.
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Tue 24-04-18 12:30
Replies: 220
And heís probably skiing slowly so the only way he can turn is to lean back to get the tips out the snow and force his way round or snow ploughing as we are supposed to be talking about technique here can I just point out that while I know where you are coming from, statements like this tend to mislead beginners in powder. Even on an all mountain 80mm waist ski it is perfectly possible to turn without leaning back - indeed much easier to do so. Afterall plenty of us learned to do that on 60mm waist skis! 1. you need to be patient to allow the ski to build a base 2. you need to compress/flex your knees as you are building the base 3. you need to extend and pivot off the base If the snow is really wet and heavy and you are really "underskied" for your weight (e.g. on slalom skis) and your tips are diving when you are straightlining then you can PULL UP ON YOUR TOES using the small muscles on the front of you shins to help the tips plane without shifting your weight back which ALWAYS reduces your ability to steer the skis. Leaning back in powder is WRONG.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Mon 23-04-18 15:47
Replies: 220
jedster wrote: @Mike Pow, Quick clarification - when you say twin-tipped do you really mean full rockered? I don't really see why twin tips as such are important for intermediates learning to ski powder. No. Twin-tipped bi-directional skis which are designed & built to be centre mounted. The tips and tails are raised but the long length of the ski is traditionally cambered. The raised tips & tails and centre mount make pivotting easier, both on and off-piste. The camber makes edging and carving on piste a known 'known' to skiers used to a traditional ski. Put enough width in tip, waist and tail and you have a great powder ski. Overall a true all-mountain ski IMHO. Interesting - have to say that the twin tipped traditionally cambered skis I have are not noticeably easier to pivot than a flat tailed ski but then they are not centre mounted. They are probably a tad stiff for an intermediate too. I still think something like the Rossi sky 7 - plenty of sidecut, a bit of traditional camber under foot, not too fat but with some tip and tail rocker - is a better bet than a twin tip. I think the twin tip itself is a red herring
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Mon 23-04-18 11:10
Replies: 220
@Mike Pow, Quick clarification - when you say twin-tipped do you really mean full rockered? I don't really see why twin tips as such are important for intermediates learning to ski powder.
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Thu 19-04-18 15:06
Replies: 31
@Mike Pow, My wife is 47 patella osteoarthritis they fold up pretty small - smaller than a big brace I think She has a love hate relationship with them. Hates the faff of putting them on, doesn't enjoy it for loo stops and even on/off chairlifts. However they reduce the pain from skiing (and the soreness in the week that follows) a great deal. She wouldn't ski much without them.
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Thu 19-04-18 15:01
Replies: 220
Mike Pow wrote: ... you just described vast swathes of Canadian Heli-ski terrain You're looking in the wrong places. It certainly doesn't describe Mica Creek!
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Thu 19-04-18 9:37
Replies: 220
... I like big powder skis too but the big advantage I find is that they give so much more margin for error - you don't have to be nearly as precise in keeping equally weighted and centred. Rockers make it easier to initiate turns too.
And post your own questions...
Thu 19-04-18 9:34
Replies: 220
The other thing with modern wider skis is that you no longer need the bouncy bouncy thing as you did in days gone by, meaning it is less physical, which is probably why I am still skiing powder at seventy one. With narrow skis turning was like doing a series of squat jumps whilst all the while trying to keep your balance. Doing that all day long really is tiring. I've always found that when you got the rhythm right the skis and the snow did the bouncing for you - it was effortless.
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Thu 19-04-18 9:30
Replies: 34
Belleville - at the top of the Hauteluce Valley - are a bit dodgy for snow cover Have to say, bar two Aprils in the last 7 years that hasn't been my experience - very shady down at Belleville. But I've only been skiing in the area for the last 7 years so may have been lucky. Otherwise, the vast majority of the skiing in LC is below the Col - at much the same altitude as the ED. The bulk of the skiing is at altitudes between the Col and 100m below Signal. That is between 2100 and 1770m. In contrast according to the ED piste map the top of nearly all the lifts is 1800m. 300m may not sound much but it makes a big difference to snow quality, particularly as the elevation is relatively protected from direct sun. Clearly neither area is remotely high. Interestingly though the Les Contamines locals always say that they do best in relatively low snow years when the Les C conditions tend to be materially better than nearby competitors. Talking to people this year they've been really delighted by the snow (more than 9m fell!) but then they say "but of course EVERYONE had good snow this year". Just shows the human tendency to be glass half empty.
And they're a friendly bunch.
Wed 18-04-18 12:45
Replies: 220
@Steilhang, maybe not by everyone (oh and I wasn't saying it was a good thing to advocate) yeah - it was wrong. I found it was only advocated by people who didn't ski powder well. Of course the planing effect caused by shorter tails made it look like people were leaning back but if you weren't centred you could steer those long planks efficiently and you needed plenty of foot and knee steering
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