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Poster: A snowHead
Wed 28-06-17 18:50
Replies: 15
It is exactly as @Dave of the Marmottes, says - most hotels will only release weekend accommodation at chepa rates once they are pretty sure they won't be getting a week booking. Actually its worse than that - if someone books sat to mon you might lose two weeks. But in my experience by mid December you'll find loads of hoteliers will be much more flexible - they'll have seen that they have a clutch of rooms left and are unlikely to sell them all. Don't stress - it will be fine
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Wed 28-06-17 11:33
Replies: 23
@jedster, that weight they should definitely be on 177s. At least. Yes - one of them has made that switch with the latest model
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Tue 27-06-17 12:59
Replies: 6
@breeze11, good choice I reckon I've had excellent late season condition in Courchevel
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Tue 27-06-17 12:57
Replies: 23
@Seatosnow, I have two mates who ski on Mantras from that period. Both are pretty strong, experienced and technically competent. They are 70kg and 78kg roughly and they skied the 170s. They SHOULD have been on the 177s really though. My feeling is that given you are a chunk lighter 177s may be too much for you unless you are a very good skier (racing background etc).
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Fri 16-06-17 13:45
Replies: 13
Nice! Guess this is the point where we have to throw in the Whitedot Redeemer option too :D
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Fri 16-06-17 11:14
Replies: 13
Faction seem to mount everything way too far forward for me... well he does do a lot of spinning and skiing switch!
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Thu 15-06-17 14:12
Replies: 113
Equally, I spend rather a lot of time most days these days typing at a keyboard (albeit one counter-optimised) but I'm still not very good at that. same with driving for most people as I've been banging on about, it's not volume of practice, it is volume of PURPOSEFUL practice.
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Tue 13-06-17 11:38
Replies: 78
BTW - I really like ski touring. I think its going to be my "thing" for a good while. But I think it is a very different experience from Heli (or Cat) - it is much more about travelling through the mountains and more about the up than the down. Skiing >30000ft of vertical all in powder in one day is an utterly different experience (we did 3.5 days 10000m, 8000m, 8000m and 5000m). Of course, arguably it's a bit like eating 10 perfectly cooked and aged sirloin steaks in a row - you can have too much of a good thing. But that's a different argument.
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Tue 13-06-17 11:31
Replies: 78
Interesting article comparing the two here: http://skicanadamag.com/cat-vs-heli-we-all-win/ with the particularly unexpected comment: "Usually the most contentious topic in my heli vs. snowcat conversations is musing about the terrain one might actually ski. Although I still hear rumours of ultra-steep terrain being skied by private small groups of trusted repeat guests at certain heli ops, my experience has encountered a clear pattern: snowcat skiing is consistently steeper." Could be true. Have to say I found Mica pretty steep - enough opportunities for "sluff management"! My mate and I were the weakest skiers in the two groups that were running on our trip. And we are pretty competent. The other group was four Austrian's in their early 30s including one guy with a sponsorship - fast as hell, and I can still see the backflip he pulled in full crucifix position of a lip on one of the alpine bowls. It was a quiet time in Jan so our group was filled out with staff from MHG's office! When we were flying in, the previous party was leaving - a bunch of pros shooting a movie. The guides were pointing out what the had been skiing "yeah they'll ski any face that has more white than rock if we let them" :D
And post your own questions...
Tue 13-06-17 11:21
Replies: 78
You get more of a wilderness experience, the satisfaction of earning your turns, a bit of fitness and (if you care about these things) less of an environmental impact. Although the flight to Canada is probably the biggest item in the environmental ledger...
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Tue 13-06-17 10:23
Replies: 45
I'm afraid I'm going to join the chorus saying its not a good option for beginners. They'll survive but you risk putting them off and perhaps more importantly damaging your friendship if they resent you for persuading them to come. I think it's a poor idea.
And they're a friendly bunch.
Tue 13-06-17 9:35
Replies: 78
I guess it kind of depends on your expectations. Heli is going to get you the most vertical unless you get unlucky, but cat skiing might be a better option to avoid disappointment if this is a once in a lifetime opportunity, or if you prefer a more sociable angle to the trip. Definitely something I'll explore. We lost 3 hours to high winds on our trip but you can get fogged in which would be incredibly frustrating. In fairness helis are not just about the speed of the lift - you can access a huge area, much bigger than you could by cat. Mica Creek has 7 valleys of terrain to play with. When we were there every group did at least one 800-1000m descent that had never been skied before (and were given naming rights :D ).
You know it makes sense.
Tue 13-06-17 9:29
Replies: 78
@jedster, the idea of a-stars is rather appealing. Yeah - the guides said that they couldn't really ski the terrain in their area with bigger groups so a-stars were perfect. I went before revelstoke built a lift but we did three days in KH to warm up.
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Mon 12-06-17 17:19
Replies: 78
I've said it before on heli threads but I really recommend Mica Creek small lodge, a-star helis so small groups, great terrain - less of an industrial feel than the big lodges with hueys. When I was there it was 12 guests - 3 groups of 4. Think it is a bit bigger now - may be only 2 helis so 6 groups of 4. https://www.micaheli.com/?gclid=CP62rNzauNQCFaa37QodznUH_Q BC - but interior, west slope of the Rockies. near(ish) Revelstoke
Poster: A snowHead
Thu 8-06-17 10:20
Replies: 100
@surfcfc, I don't think you need to over-complicate this! Early March is a great time to go - especially as a beginner - reliable snow and milder weather. A hotel near the piste in any of the high French resorts is ideal - minimal hassle and you don't need a huge number or variety of pistes as a beginner. I don't think it matters which resort really. Don't sweat about equipment hire - any shop will find you something suitable for beginners. I think you could chose not to buy googles and only buy them in resort if the weather requires them - you might very well manage with sunglasses all week (although I personally prefer to ski in goggles many do not and overheating is perhaps more of an issue if you are travelling slower and hauling yourself up more as a beginner) Have a great trip
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Thu 1-06-17 16:57
Replies: 45
I cycle a bit (road and MTB) for fitness which also helps balance yes - agree. I commute by bike and on the London leg that involves quite a few red lights. Years ago I decided that those were an opportunity to practice track stands. I'm not that great although in my defence I don't ride fixed so its harder but I generally manage to avoid unclipping most days. I think that's helped my balance quite a lot.
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Thu 1-06-17 14:49
Replies: 19
Interesting. The earlier Mantra's were still made in Germany when the manufacturing switched (ie same construction as the Racetiger GS) but then I believe they moved them as well as I had some in for service (& delam repair) were the "Made in Germany" markings had gone. Looks like they've gone back in-house which I'm sure is a good thing. Yeah noticed while fondling skis in ski shops (as you do :oops: ) that generally the more expensive models say made in Germany and the cheaper ones are made in China. It seemed to me that volkl, K2 and Line look to use a wider range of construction techniques than say Rossi/Dynastar - they seem less integrated. But it could be that they are just doing a better job of hiding common architecture to a layman like me.
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Thu 1-06-17 12:49
Replies: 19
I'd have thought one angle PE would explore is better integrating the businesses - leveraging the same manufacturing and R&D across the ski brands, integrating marker bindings into packages. I know there are costs to that (creativity, brand focus etc) but skillful management can mitigate that.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Thu 1-06-17 12:41
Replies: 113
BTW - the second part rings lots of bells with me. Watching other skiers has been very valuable to me and I have the same chats with my kids on chairlifts! Also my kids are currently showing similar signs - my daughter (12) was more natural than my son (14) to the extent that she beat him two years running in an end of ski school mini GS. But he has progressed much faster in the last 2 years because he is more watches more closely and is always working on something. I'm trying to say to my daughter "right this run I want to see you doing x" and she responds quite well but she needs prodding.
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Thu 1-06-17 12:36
Replies: 113
@valais2, And it doesn't always have to be very structured drills does it? e.g., this run I'm going to ski long turns and initiate each one by softening the old downhill leg and feeling for the little toe edge e.g., this run I'm going to carve short turns and make sure I stay as low as possible at transition but try to "kiss" the snow gently with the new edge e.g., I'm on a gentle blue - time for some skiing on the outside edges Your not just skiing, you are trying something, seeing how it works, taking lessons from that, enhancing one little piece of skill that you can blend in
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Thu 1-06-17 12:23
Replies: 113
That's what I mean about it being non-binary - why assume that people are only capable of change in the company of an instructor? I don't - lots of people can do purposeful practice without an instructor (working on something they've seen in a book, observed in another skier or heard in a tip from a skilled ski buddy). not to say instruction isn't useful.
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Thu 1-06-17 12:19
Replies: 113
@abc, i'd agree. Faster and more confident doesn't equal better... Me too. I saw seasonnaires who skied a lot but made very little technical progress. They did get better at managing their technical shortcomings through strength, balance, tactics. I think pure mileage helps with all that but purposeful practice is needed to make technical progress (can be done while getting lots of mileage but needs you to be explicitly working on something as you do it).
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Wed 31-05-17 18:40
Replies: 9
Looks nice. I forget, is there a decent car park at Le Praz? I mean for accessing 3V in winter.
And post your own questions...
Wed 31-05-17 9:15
Replies: 113
Psychologists say children have short attention span and low tolerance to boredom. But when it comes to training in sports, I'm never able to focus on training as an adult even close to what I used to be able to do as a teenager. The sort of practice I used to do to make certain basic movement second nature in my body, hours and hours of it for several years, it would drive me mad even thinking about it at my current age! I tend to agree. The truth is I'm not that good at purposeful practice in general but somehow I have found skiing captivating in a way that makes the purposefulness much less of a chore. Getting back to the talent/practice thing my sense is to be really good (i.e. pro level in any mainstream sport) you need real talent AND the ability to dedicate yourself to purposeful practice not just volume. But you need both and of course if you have a bit more of one then you can get away with a bit less of the other. Apologies to non-cricket lovers but compare say David Gower and Geoff Boycott. No one would accuse Gower of being the most disciplined trainer. Few people who grew up playing with Boycott thought he was the most talented player in Yorkshire but they achieved broadly similar results. If you watched Gower's almost unique ability to bring bat to ball at the optimum fraction of a second so that it skimmed through the covers with minimal effort you'd know there was something special going on that much more intense and disciplined trainers were not able to replicate.
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Tue 30-05-17 10:41
Replies: 113
But on the original question - what hold's me back? I'd say the following things: 1. not enough of the right kind of purposeful practice One of the things that Sayed writes about is the distinction between volume of practice and purposeful practice. I ski 25-30 days a season (have done for 4 years, before that with the exception of one season it was 7-14). I don't think doubling the volume would help unless the time was really focused on technical improvement - just skiing isn't enough. Now I am pretty good at being purposeful when I'm skiing but the areas of my skiing where I feel I would really like to be better I struggle to get enough practice at, e.g., I'm confident skiing bumps but can I really flow in the zipper line when the bumps get big and icy? No. To get better at that I'd have to spend whole days skiing bumps and my friends and family create other priorities. Also I'm comfortable off piste in pretty much all conditions but I struggle to really flow when the conditions get complex - steep rollers, little gullies, holes, sudden steep banks - I tend to hit terrain too hard, not be soft enough on my skis, tense up when I get air. But finding that terrain to ski repeatedly enough to get real practice done is tough. 2. a lack of skiing when I was really young I skied a couple of times in my teens and then went every year from when I was 20. I did a season when I was 23 and skied a lot but I don't think all those hours had the same effect that hours spend below the age of ten have in terms of developing feel and utterly unconsciously grooved body movements. My son is 14 and has been skiing since he was 3 - only on holidays, no racing etc. I'm still a better skier in just about every respect but I can see a sort of fluid naturalness in how he moves that I haven't got. Provided he continues to enjoy skiing and wants to improve he will be better than me. Question is how soon. 3. mediocre athleticism Naturally I've got strong legs, good stamina and have a good ability to see in my minds eye what my body is doing - those help with skiing (mainly the last one). But I don't have many fast twitch fibres and I lack explosive/gymnastic talent (I know this from sprinting, jumping and gymnastics at school and my limitations as a rock climber). That was always going to cap my level.
And they're a friendly bunch.
Tue 30-05-17 10:13
Replies: 113
proprioception & kinesthetic awareness By that do you mean the ability to picture what your body is doing in your minds eye? If so I think that is a big differentiator on how quickly people can learn and perhaps more so on how much they can learn without coaching.
You know it makes sense.
Thu 25-05-17 10:29
Replies: 63
@Hells Bells, Now that diet would make me depressed ! Tinned meat doesn't really figure on the scene unless it is confit de canard and do people really use tinned potatoes? Does Tignes not have any veg? You'll be telling me you used Smash next. And faced with that why not just eat local bread, cheese, charcuterie, salad? Or make an omlette? Or knock up some pasta sauce from tomatoes, onions, basil and lardons?
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Tue 23-05-17 10:26
Replies: 17
@saskew, If there's an insurance policy that can protect me a bit more I'd be happy to pay a bit extra! I don't think you should to be honest. With insurance you pay a premium to protect you against risk - you expect to lose out of it but you avoid the small chance of a really bad outcome that would hammer your finances. It just doesn't make sense to pay up to protect yourself against relatively small losses that you can "self-insure" against. Personally I tend to accept an excess if it results in lower premiums.
Poster: A snowHead
Fri 19-05-17 9:47
Replies: 25
sorry yes - SC not RS. Think another brand uses RS for their SL/GS compromise? I agree about stockli pricing! Problem is they are handmade in Switzerland - never going to be cheap. The only pair I have I bought in 2005 and were £500 ski only then. In fairness I still use them a bit and love them so VFM has been perfectly sensible. I'm a bit split personality between loving a bargain and paying up for a high quality INVESTMENT. Do more of the former but TBH my best buys have been the latter... I think if my stocklis die (use them has my hard piste skis) I might well push the boat out on some Laser SC.
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Thu 18-05-17 14:39
Replies: 25
I was looking at stockli and as I remember they do SL, GS and RS inbetween - intermediate radius basically. Strikes me that for piste use rather than real racing RS is a better bet for most people.
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Thu 18-05-17 12:52
Replies: 22
Rather than just blindly go for another alpine boot, there's now the very realistic option of a good "touring capable" boots that are every bit as good inbound as the average alpine boots. ah - makes sense. freeride boot with swappable soles sounds like a good idea then
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Thu 18-05-17 11:33
Replies: 42
s far as practice, I think it's not necessary and the last thing I'd want to do would be to seek out garbage snow in order to get better at riding it. Although if you ski off piste a lot you WILL find yourself on stretches of rubbish snow at times, even just on wind scoured sections between the good stuff of sun crust getting to shady slopes. So ski off piste as much as possible and you'll get the practice.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Thu 18-05-17 11:29
Replies: 22
As a skier, I have difficulty fathoming hours of uphill travel. ... On the other hand, I do fair bit of ... hiking in the summer Well that is your answer - you need to see long touring days as more like summer hiking but with a bit of skiing thrown in. It's a great day out in the mountains and it sounds like you enjoy days out in the mountains.
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Thu 18-05-17 11:16
Replies: 22
@abc, I think you'd like to buy some kit but given your situation you probably KNOW you'd be better off hiring touring gear and seeing how much you enjoy it :D We have a shop in our resort that hires bloody good AT gear at very reasonable prices. Honestly buying is hard to justify unless you are touring a lot. Of course lots of us buy gear regardless :oops: Beyond that, If you just want to do some short skins from the lifts then I'd agree F10/12 and your existing alpine boots would be the way forward. Hold off buying boots until you know what sort of touring you will be doing and how much. I don't think it is an easy choice - boots that are really good for long uphill days are too compromised if you are mainly going to be doing side country stuff on big skis. Heavier freeride boots with swappable soles are far from ideal if you are skinning 1000m.
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Tue 16-05-17 9:44
Replies: 42
well quite - the reason its normally done on steep ground is that you use some of that height to get round
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Tue 16-05-17 8:45
Replies: 42
@Tomahawk Tone, now that does actually require a bit more energy than the edge check/rebound approach. Useful skill though. Not that I can quite do the "losing no height at all bit"
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Tue 16-05-17 8:44
Replies: 42
@Tomahawk Tone, now that does actually require a bit more energy than the edge check/rebound approach. Useful skill though. Not that I can quite do the "losing no height at all bit"
And post your own questions...
Mon 15-05-17 14:34
Replies: 42
If anything the opposite applies - lightweight skis and tech bindings make skiing re-frozen rattly mank even more unpleasant IME. A little extra weight and mass normally helps smooth things out a tad. agreed - almost said that
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Mon 15-05-17 14:32
Replies: 44
Courchevel has reliable snow, the sort of slopes you're looking for, along with smart (and expensive) hotels directly onto easy pistes. I wouldn't describe the town as pretty though. If money isn't a major object then one of the hotels on the Bellecote in Courchevel 1850 would suit you very well indeed. The town isn't a beauty but that part of it is quite nice with good views
And they're a friendly bunch.
Mon 15-05-17 11:46
Replies: 42
(b) on lightweight touring skis and technical bindings (that last one, of course, could be just me making excuses ). I honestly don't think ski weight is very important for this, it is technique. I think it's unconscious practice more than conscious practice though. You commit to a little off piste detour and then stick with it because it's a bit funky rather than downright miserable. Sure - something looks interesting, turns out to be a bit ropey but there is a certain satisfaction at skiing it competently even if you can't truly flow over it. Tends to get filed as "well that was a little character-building" at the bottom.
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