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Poster: A snowHead
Wed 26-04-17 15:45
Replies: 23
another point to consider - it's unlikely to be wet if it is cold enough to need to ski in down so you can throw the down on top of the shell when you need the extra warmth. e.g., when you stop moving for a bit.
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Tue 25-04-17 10:44
Replies: 8
I've never tried on dynafit boots so can't comment on that. On sizing up for touring, I'm no expert but I think it is more subtle than going up a size. I'd definitely say it is worth having more room around the toes - a close performance fit that means your toes jam against the boot unless you are flexed forward would not be fun for long days of skinning and hiking. But you don't want them loose around the heels because heel lift when skinning = rubs and blisters. Ideally I think you want a snug fit around the heel with a roomy toe box. Personally I wouldn't buy without trying them on.
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Tue 25-04-17 8:55
Replies: 19
davidof, FWIW the Beasts sit between the two weight wise. and of course you don't have to lift the frame and heel piece with every skinning stride as you do with a frame binding. That said, we discussed this a while back and I have some sympathy with the suggestion that Arno made that a better alternative than beast 14 may be skis quiver killered for rad 2s and, say, guardians. beast 14 is really a freeride binding and makes sense for someone who prefers to do most of their lift served skiing in touring/free ride boots with tech fittings. TBH I thought that was me but turns out it isnt.
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Tue 25-04-17 8:48
Replies: 5
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Sun 23-04-17 19:28
Replies: 19
Yup, if you are on a glacier take steel. Alloy crampons are ok on neve. fair enough Our guide recommended alloy for the kind of stuff we were doing but opinions differ. He did mention he was looking at some new titanium ones which are probably the best of both worlds I did a bit of googling and some people climb pretty desperate stuff in alloy crampons!
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Sun 23-04-17 19:24
Replies: 81
@jedster, I don't know why people say that! The two aren't mutually exclusive. Having an app on my phone, it takes absolutely nothing away from the joy that I get from my 95 days skiing this winter. Nothing, there's no connection between the two. Curiosity is never a bad thing but apathy is a bit sad didn't suggest it did detract just that it doesn't add anything to my enjoyment I can assure you I'm not remotely apathetic about skiing!
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Sun 23-04-17 17:41
Replies: 19
When doing more simplistic day touring / slack country then ski choice is based on conditions, and with classic spring snow then it's my Scott SuperGuide 88's again matched up with uber light skins and Dynafit ST 2.0s. That's exactly the sort of thing I'd say is ideal for most touring duties. The extra weight of skins is another case against fatter skis of course. Personally I'm very confident skiing even quite deep powder on 88s. I may not be able to rip it up as much as I could on fat skis but if your up a big mountain in glaciated terrain, you need to be a bit circumspect about your speed anyway!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Sun 23-04-17 17:36
Replies: 19
But if that is all you have well you'll just have to accept it. well for the timebeing I won't do enough hut to hut / ski mountaineering stuff to justify another set up and the R108s are be great for side country day tours plus lift served off piste. There is a good shop in Les C that hires loads of up to date touring gear at very reasonable prices - next time for hut to hut I'll hire some lighter/shorter/narrower skis and bindings. But for high altitude touring you are going to have to suffer some weight - harness, crevasse rescue gear, rope (now they are heavy to carry). Steel crampons and ice-axe are a good idea if you are on glaciated terrain. Climbing helmet of course. So I don't think your crampons and axe were out of place for what you were doing. a lot of that stuff I didn't mention because I think there is less choice involved. We did carry climbing helmets although they stayed in the bags - wasn't a time when we felt exposed to rock or ice fall. I think alloy crampons and ice axes are adequate for glacier walking and snow ridges. Do you disagree? Our guide carried the rope of course. I need to get a shorter / lighter one for glacier safety than the 70m single rope that is the only one I own (mainly for easy sport climbing). Guide recommended 30m half rope which you can get at not much over 2kg I think. Still the heaviest thing in the pack if your skis are on your feet!
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Sun 23-04-17 17:21
Replies: 9
Yes - day 2 and day 3 were very different in that respect. We had the Pain de Sucre to ourselves but there were probably 25-30 people summitting the Miages that day although only perhaps 10 skied the Armancette. It looks even busier on the ridge because the short section of ice arrete was a real bottleneck and a queue formed as Greg and another guide sorted out a fixed rope.
And post your own questions...
Sun 23-04-17 11:24
Replies: 19
First of all, many people who post on this board are WAY more experienced ski tourers than me - not intending to offer any egg sucking lessons to grandparents - but I thought it might be worth offering my lessons learned to any off piste skiers moving into touring or side country tourers thinking about true ski mountaineering. When you are skinning 1000m per day to reasonable altitudes weight really matters - you'll enjoy it more carrying less and every little counts I knew this but now I really KNOW it. I took quite a lot of equipment with me that worked but was heavier than it needed to be. I did that partly because I had this gear already and wanted to use it (for partly sentimental reasons) but also because I thought I'd cope OK. When you spend several hours at just below your aerobic threshold chasing a superfit mountain guide your sense of the ideal trade off changes! When I'm above 3000m I find that if I get pushed through my aerobic threshold it takes me a little while to get back on top of my breathing - a bit more margin would have been nice (or more time to acclimatise). Anyway examples of gear choices: rucksack - I used a Deuter Guide 35+. It's a bloody good alpine pack - comfortable, very stable, well thought out features, tough - but it isn't light at about 1700g. If you want one pack for rock climbing, alpine mountaineering and ski touring it is a classic choice but if you are not going to be dragging it up rock faces and mixed gullies then you can go quite a lot lighter. Our guide used a really nice Salomon X-Alp 30 which is only 1000g. I'm also looking at Deuter Pace 30 which looks really good at 870g. 700-800g is a BIG saving (boot) crampons - I took some full on B3 step ins that I have had since my mountaineering days (25 years ago!). They must be 1000g. You can get lightweight crampons at 400-500g. They wouldn't stand up to a lot of mixed use or big climbs on front points but that is not what ski tours really involve ice axe - I used a fairly traditional mountaineering axe - not a real technical tool but one that is suitable for climbing steep sections in mixed gullies. These are weighted to swing and penetrate hard ice - again this is not typical ski touring stuff. When you need an axe you will normally be using the shaft to provide security when walking and perhaps occasionally "daggering" the pick on steeper sections but seldom swinging it. Lighter and a bit longer is better and there are loads of really light touring axes on the market clothing - I actually got this about right - lightweight goretex shell, softshell pants, merino base layer, fairly lightweight gloves plus lightweight fleece hoody (only wore early morning). In the pack - spare socks, spare base layer, 3/4 tights, down vest, buff, sun hat. I did bring some spare gloves but I wouldn't next time. excess tat - far too much of this! Took two phones (I know...) and a good compact camera. In theory the weight of the camera was justified but in practice I seldom felt I had the time to spend making the most of it and the iphone would have been adequate. If I'd been lighter and faster then may be that would have been different. I actually carried two head torches by accident (idiot!). A pack of cards - not used and you can generally find some in the huts. Too much duct tape/cord/cable ties "just in case" - a small kit is sensible but could go minimal and shared across the group. Too many stuff sacks, crampon bags, etc - it all adds up. I also carried two mars bars and two muesli bars back down with me - clearly unnecessary. And then there is the big question about skis/bindings/boots! I used my whitedot R108CL 186cm with Beast 14s and fischer transalp lite boots It's really a freeride set up although the boots are middle weight touring boots rather than stiffer/heavier freeride boots. In my view it is far from ideal for late season ski mountaineering - don't get me wrong, it all worked but I don't think there was a single moment when I wouldn't have been better (or at least no worse) with a narrower, shorter, lighter ski and lighter binding. The obvious stuff - you are spending most of your time on the uphill. Wider gains you nothing and costs you weight and energy. Longer gains you nothing and costs you weight and energy. You really need to believe the pay back on the down hill is big to compensate for the fact you will be more tired. The less obvious stuff - uphill - wide skis are a disadvantage when you are traversing across steep neve. You slip more which takes energy to recover, you are tenser, you reach for your couteau earlier/more often which makes you less efficient. On the third day the first couple of hours from the Conscrits involved a long traverse on neve with a section of downhill traverse too short to justify removing skins. Trying to ski a downward traverse on crisp neve with only your toes fixed on 108mm waist skis is bloody awkward - you just have very little control from the toes back. Would be much better with edges closer to your feet. I took a fall - no damage, not really dangerous but energy sapping and in a different situation downhill - in a mixture of neve, wind crust, shallow powder, spring snow and chalk 108mm offers nothing over 88mm in my view. On the firmer snow (say traversing an icy patch) they are inferior. In April you can't expect to be in boot top powder much of the time. I'd say R108s are ideal for soft snow sidecountry freeriding or even skiing couloirs in soft conditions but for late season ski mountaineering I'd go with something 176cm ish and 88mm waist and LIGHT. One further comment - there were about 40 pairs of skis at the Conscrits hut when we were there - mine were the biggest!
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Sun 23-04-17 10:16
Replies: 9
thanks made a couple of errors with my pic links - edited now
And they're a friendly bunch.
Sun 23-04-17 10:06
Replies: 81
no idea and no interest in finding out skiing is about the sensations not the distance IMO
You know it makes sense.
Sat 22-04-17 20:41
Replies: 9
After contemplating it for a few years (and asking advice here) earlier in April I finally got to the top of Lest Domes des Miages and skied down the Armancette glacier. It was a great trip, whetted my appetite for more ski mountaineering, may be it might seduce a few other people over to this part of the Mont Blanc Massif. A friend and I arranged a guide (Greg) via the Guides' office in Les Contamines. I had a few ideas about the itinerary but the office made some good suggestions. The plan was Day 1: take the Les Contamines lifts to the top of the Buche Croisse. Short skin (250m) to the Col de Fenetre. Ski back down to the upper part of the Montjoie valley (800m) at Nant Boran. Climb 550m to the Refuge de la Tres le Tete Day 2: traverse to the snout of the Tres le Tete glacier then skin up to the top of Le Pain de Sucre du MontTondu (a bit over 3000m, climb of 1100m). Ski back down to the Tres le Tete galcier (about 600m) then skin 250m to Refge de Conscrits Day 3: Skin to the Col des Domes (about 3500m, climb of 800m) then traverse the Domes de Miage before skiing down the Armancette until the snow ran out and back on foot to Les contamines (2500m down) View of most of the route taken from the Les C ski area earlier in the season: http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/tour_1_.jpg Greg checking out Les Domes des Miages from the Col de Fenetre http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00042.JPGhttp://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC000481.JPG Near the top of the carry up to the Tres le Tete hut. Normally you would be able to skin most of the climb but the guides and guardiens were all bemoaning a dry season http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00058.JPG Day 2 - on foot getting around "le Mauvais Pas" to the foot of the glacier. It's a fairly airy but good mountain path - not tricky enough to need rope http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00070.JPG Sunrise on the glacier http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00086.JPG Slightly awkward skin to Pain de Sucre - a couple of inches of fresh over angled neve http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00092.JPG View to Col Infranchissable, summit of Mt Blanc beyond http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00095.JPG Aiguilles de Glaciers and Tres le Tete http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00100.JPG Start of the ski from Pain de Sucre http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC001081.JPG Day 3 - at the Col Infranchissable http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00130.JPG Setting off up the summit ridge http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00132.JPG From the summit looking back to Aiguille de Bionassay, Dome de Gouter and Mont Blanc http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00139.JPG There was an "interesting" section on the ridge. Maybe 40m where it thinned to a narrow ice arete. The guides had chopped out a thin ledge but the traverse was on front points, hands gripping the slippery ice crest at a bit above waist height. I didn't spend much time looking down - about 500m of 60-70 degree ice between your feet. Greg had set up a fixed rope on ice screws as a back up to the rope he was leading us on so although it was exciting it was safe. http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00140.JPG Well earned lunch on the summit. Trying to recharge our batteries enough to do justice to the descent http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00145.JPG Looking down the top section of the Armancette glacier - Les Contamines is in the valley below, at 1100m. Les C ski area is on the lower mountains opposite. Megeve over that ridge. Feeling high up at 3650m! http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00154.JPG And so the ski. Not too many pics I'm afraid but it is a memorable ski. I was surprised how sustained the gradient was. Short sections of 45 degrees, longer at 40 degrees but seldom below 30. We started in tricky wind crust, then grippy chalk before a bit of powder then lots and lots of lovely spring snow. Only slushy as the snow ran out at about 1600m. In good conditions you can ski to the village but we had a pleasant walk through the pines. Snow on the upper section kept us on our toes - wind crust over powder http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00157.JPG About half way down looking towards the Arve valley, route goes left in front of the rocky ridge http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00158.JPG A little powdery section to play in http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1301/medium/DSC00162.JPG A really great trip. Very much recommended. As usual I came away full of admiration for the capabilities and shear professionalism of UIAGM guides. Greg was great company and full of ideas for future adventures! I found the skinning pretty tough going at altitude - partly this is about aclimatisation, partly about fitness but I also had a bit too much weight - gear choice wasn't optimal but I'll save that for a separate post.
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Fri 21-04-17 15:49
Replies: 25
@gra, Neoshell, Good call - got my wife a Rab one - excellent The new hybrid Arc'teryx jackets such as Alpha Comp did you see my review on the post one above yours!
Poster: A snowHead
Fri 21-04-17 13:44
Replies: 25
@brokenbetty, coming to this late but I'd avoid goretex softshell for spring use if you run warm (as I do). I'd go for one of two options: a true non membrane softshell (more breathable than any membrane based shell) a hardshell ideally with pitzips (less warm because unlined and can dump heat if through pit vents if it gets warm) I've actually recently got one of these which is something of a hybrid of the two: http://www.barrabes.co.uk/arcteryx-alpha-comp-hoody/p-43763?idvariedad=235145&opt=d&utm_source=Google.uk&utm_medium=Shopping&utm_campaign=producto&gclid=CJuJp4rItdMCFUk8Gwode1gGEQ Although I got 50% off on a sample from Sportpursuit. This has goretex hardshell on hood, shoulders, arms and round the bottom and a fully breathable but not fully waterproof material around most of the torso. I used it ski touring recently in Spring conditions recently and it worked very well (breathability, light weight) but I haven't tested it in foul conditions yet. Honestly I think its a bit niche and if I was buying one jacket in your shoes I'd go for a snowsport specific hardshell - that should give you everything you need. These are a bit overpriced: http://www.facewest.co.uk/Arcteryx-AW16-Sidewinder-SV-Jacket.html?gclid=CMzMro_JtdMCFQwaGwodj78Mow but I just mention it as perhaps the definitive quality snowsport specific hardshell jacket (not saying it is the best but one of the original ones - I bought one of the first models in about 2001 and I'm still using it a bit).
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Fri 21-04-17 13:28
Replies: 39
I see many poor skiers but I seldom think the problems are down to boot choice
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Fri 21-04-17 9:23
Replies: 39
Yes, when it becomes obvious that the author is relying on mystifying the reader with language which sounds technical but isn't. They assume we're all more stupid than they are. Almost all academic papers are written like that. It's even worse in social sciences than proper science. My sister (in her 40s) recently completed a phd and was militantly opposed to writing in academic language. She stuck it out and wrote in plain English. All her assessors were amazed but ended up praising it. Some people have suggested that the excessively complex language is designed to be hard to understand so that you can wriggle out if what you've have written is later shown to be garbage.
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Thu 20-04-17 18:52
Replies: 39
I don't have that problem but I always do my first couple of runs with buckles loose - just find that nicely sets my heel into the heel pocket before I fix it by snugging the buckles
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Thu 20-04-17 18:00
Replies: 39
although I start out the day with only the top buckle done on its loosest setting, and strap adjusted for that, if I want to ski with any performance, without feeling a little "loose", I have to start tightening 1 and buckling up 2. Buckles 3 and 4 (working down that is) never actually do anything. Interesting - with an overlap boot you are effectively skiing a softer boot until you crank the buckles (top two - I agree lower ones are largely decorative!).
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Thu 20-04-17 17:56
Replies: 39
@valais2, I posted about it before but I recently bought some secondhand FT Classics (they are not quite the same as the current classic as they have the intuition wrap liners, more like the Drop Kick) really as a low cost experiment because I have never had a pair of boots that fitted me as well as my first ones - Raichle Flexons. I've skied about 10 days on them now and really like them. I've got a 6 flex tongue in them and have been thinking about trying a stiffer one, again mainly just as an experiment because I've not found that I've overpowered them yet.
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Thu 20-04-17 14:38
Replies: 105
I bought ski-mojos for my wife and they have been a great buy. That said she has a love/hate relationship with them (needs them but dislikes all the straps and faff). The againer looks a lot simpler and neater. If it is as effective in use but easier to put on and wear then I would consider the price premium reasonable. @PBJ, did your friend compare them in use to mojos before he bought?
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Thu 20-04-17 14:16
Replies: 8
@cockerhoop, As @Hells Bells, says, I think you are too early to book short breaks. My experience of booking short breaks (quite a lot) is you need to do it nearer the time when the hotels begin to know that they will not get enough full week bookings to fill capacity.
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Thu 20-04-17 14:14
Replies: 39
I'm a bit torn on this topic: 1. first of all by focusing on powerstraps he rather misses the big argument which would be that OVERLY STIFF boots (through whatever design mechanism one of which might be a powerstrap) reduce the skiers ability to push their knee over their toe and depending on other biomechanical issues that might make it difficult for them to stay centred over their feet as they sink down/ stand up (absorb and extend) 2. that said - for me personally I do like a bit of "give" so that I can avoid my fairly chunky thighs and backside moving backwards too much as I absorb/compress (helps keep my CoM over my feet without me having to bend too much at the waist) 3. I recently fitted booster straps (essentially particularly powerful powerstraps) to my touring boots because I found that with fairly big skis (R108 186cms) my touring boots were too low and didn't provide enough support to forward pressure. They have worked well by acting as a true extra / higher buckle that straps my liner to the (more) rigid rear spine. This is the effect he talks about but the starting point was a boot that was inadequately supportive so delivering something which is more optimal for me So in essence powerstraps are not inherently bad - they can provide additional support/height/stiffness to the boot and that can be a good or bad thing depending on how well suited the boot is to your biomechanics and technique. No? But BTW, I don't really understand why it makes sense for someone like @under a new name, (relatively light and short, technical skier) to ski in very stiff boots. What is it exactly that they do for you? And how do you flex them at anything but full on race speeds? (not picking - obviously they DO work, just curious why they are a good choice).
And post your own questions...
Wed 19-04-17 16:12
Replies: 3
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Wed 19-04-17 11:10
Replies: 8
God they must be heavy. My kids were on Atomic Redster SLs for a while and I thought those were heavy!
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Wed 19-04-17 9:22
Replies: 2
You know it makes sense.
Tue 18-04-17 17:38
Replies: 11
@jedster, I can't remember the last year that Val d'Isere/Tignes didn't have most of the area open at Christmas. agreed but conditions are not necessarily that good. I'd prefer to wait and see whether Austria, Italy or France had the best snow and with only 3 adults to accommodate that would be quite easy to do.
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Tue 18-04-17 13:38
Replies: 11
After the past 3 years I think it is tough to claim anywhere has truly reliable snow at Xmas. Personally for a party of 3 adults I'd hold off and book near the time.
Poster: A snowHead
Tue 18-04-17 13:14
Replies: 30
@clarky999, @dogwatch, quite. People who go up everest are generally prepared with survival gear to spend a night exposed at 7000m. actually often not In mountaineering their is a painful trade-off between going light and fast to avoid being benighted and the consequences of an enforced night out if things go wrong. So it is not unusual that people have to survive a night without sleeping bags/bivvy bags/stoves etc
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Tue 18-04-17 10:31
Replies: 30
@dogwatch, To be fair people have survived nights out at over 7000m in the Himalayas where it would be a lot colder than Alps in January. I'm not saying it would be pleasant or less than dangerous but it is survivable.
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Tue 18-04-17 10:24
Replies: 3
oops pics that didnt work http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/500/medium/IMG_22842.JPG tecnicas http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/500/helmet.jpg helmet
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Tue 18-04-17 10:14
Replies: 26
Just back at work after Easter in Les C Snow cover was worse than in last few years but most pistes were open until we left (Sat). I see that Les C will get through to its scheduled close (21st) but only just - quite a few more pistes now shut. The skiing was actually a lot of fun - plenty of options to follow the spring snow round the mountain as it transformed. Late lunches in the sun, lounging on the balcony late afternoon, mustn't grumble! On @homers double's question, I'd have no worries about booking Megeve in February - conditions have always been fine. Xmas and Easter I'd book late once I knew what the conditions were looking like.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Sun 16-04-17 14:35
Replies: 36
I did a 3 day ski tour last week (write up to follow) including a couple of peaks in the Mt Blanc Massif. Neither I, my mate or our guide carried ABS. None of the other parties we saw on the mountain were using them. I have 2 ABS packs in my "cave". Now the avalanche risk was very low (after we got back the risk level in resort was listed at "1" - not sure I've ever seen below 2 before) but the bigger issue is that the weight of an ABS system on top of glacier kit, boot crampons, couteau, ice axe, etc etc makes the vertical of big mountain tours a bit too arduous. Our guide said that he only uses ABS for freeride / lift served. Happily, classic late season touring on neve and spring snow is less avalanche prone than earlier season touring in powder.
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Sun 16-04-17 14:25
Replies: 3
annual clear out! Lange Comp 80 Team ski boots marked as euro 36, Lange size chart tells me that is mondo 22.5 or UK 3.5ish. BSL is 275mm http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/500/medium/IMG_2282.JPG Nice 4 clip plus powerstrap junior ski boots - bought new and have about 5 weeks use - hoped my daughter might get to use them too but she grew through them before she got the chance I'd say that these are relatively high performance for a junior boot but my son who is not a racer and has a light build didn't find them too stiff. £45 + postage - should pay off in under 2 weeks versus hiring! Tecnica "The Agent" 65 ski boots size 22.0-22.5 BSL 268 - I'd say these are a size down from the Langes http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/500/medium/IMG_2284.JPG Again these are 4 clip plus powerstrap kids boots. A bit softer but still a good performance boot. £35 + postage Scott ski poles 100cm bright green http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1276/medium/poles1.jpg £10 + postage Scott Punisher helmet - white - kids small (daughter wore it age 10) [img]http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/500/helmet.jpg[/img) only 4 weeks use - not crashed! £10 + postage
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Tue 4-04-17 17:34
Replies: 154
@Charliee, I'm off next week, taking 76mm underfoot, you don't sink that much in decent corn and you can carve through slush on an edge so no need for the width IMHO. No need for the extra width IMHO, zero benefits +1 what I was getting at
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Tue 4-04-17 13:09
Replies: 12
We had the same dilemma with our two. In the end we did a mixture of private lessons (2 to 1) and skiing with me. Their instructor was more biased to freeride than piste performance so that's what they did more of (partly I think he just enjoyed the chance to be offpiste rather than teaching beginners on the nursery slope).
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Tue 4-04-17 12:45
Replies: 154
@Charliee, Almost invariably ski on my 98ish mm Bonafides for everything. All season. Not that helpful when they have a choice though. personally, if I am going to be out first thing on the frozen pistes then I tend to go a bit narrower - I can make nicer turns in slush on a narrower ski than I can on ice with a fat ski. I actually find it very satisfying linking short carves on icy blue and red runs - technically demanding. If I'm going to get up a bit later :oops: or know I'll be trying to maximise the the spring snow offpiste then I'll go fatter. As far as slush is concerned, it may not be ideal but a skinnier, stiff ski will chop through it nicely.
And post your own questions...
Mon 3-04-17 11:57
Replies: 8
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Mon 3-04-17 10:10
Replies: 44
.S. Have you seen the movie Gnar? Watched it with my boy (4 1/2) before we went. He skied up to 2 ESF instructors and announced 'My Daddy is the best skier on the mountain!'. Priceless. Ha! Hope they'd seen the movie too or I'd be turning purple. When I did book the group, I described myself as 'strong'. I try to be quite specific about the amount and sort of skiing I've done to avoid making value judgments. But I'll use the "expert" word if I feel it's required to get the right equipment or group (with embarrassment I might add). But it's funny how on several occasions when I and my mates have booked a new guide, after we stop for the first time, he'll be grinning and say something along the lines of "we're going to have a really good day". It's not because we are that good it's just they are obviously used to "grade inflation" from clients.
And they're a friendly bunch.
Mon 3-04-17 9:52
Replies: 8
@jbob, isn't that commonly known as a "ski holiday" Yes, I'm a bit confused too. How is touring without any uphill any different from skiing around a big ski area? Do you mean just that you book accommodation in different villages every night and wear the same thermals a few days in a row?
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