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Poster: A snowHead
Thu 18-01-18 15:15
Replies: 155
@Dave of the Marmottes, Reckon you are right that some of the skiers line in powder is tradition/habit but in my case it is often also Ďmaking the mostí of the powder. I kind of feel Iíve missed out if I only get a few of the floaty / surfy transitions in a big powder field. I tend to let the skis run more and make big turns once the slope is chopped up. I think my favourite terrain is trees and bushes where you are obliged to work with the terrain/obstacles, you often get the best snow and quite a lot of people get deterred
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Thu 18-01-18 15:05
Replies: 4
Iíd do a day with whistler heli, especially if you havenít heliskied before. Itís not the same experience as a private heli lodge but it is still very cool. I think youíll find plenty of lift served, Avi controlled terrain inbounds such that you donít feel the need for a guide
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Thu 18-01-18 14:53
Replies: 10
@hawkesbaynz, Indeed, taste stops being a consideration if I get offered free luxury accommodation in a top ski resort :D
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Thu 18-01-18 14:51
Replies: 21
Yep - I think we are talking about the same thing. The bounce comes from releasing the flex (and the pressure on the skis) rather than flinging your upper body upwards. As you say Dave, when you are travelling fast enough to plane you can just bank over but I think people who are struggling to get the skis around arenít at that point yet. Btw perhaps one other relevant tactic when it gets steeper and you are setting off: making a slight turn AWAY from the fall line to give yourself some steering angle to compress against so that you can then release more pressure to carry you all the way through the fall line when you commit to the first proper turn.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Thu 18-01-18 13:29
Replies: 21
@Dave of the Marmottes, Agreed but if we are talking about learning to get the feel and realise what it is like not to have to force the skis then it is a helpful progression in my experience
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Thu 18-01-18 11:23
Replies: 1
I can't help on the specifics but just a thought - aren't all this class of ski going to be fairly heavy, very reactive, offering strong rebound and be quite exhausting. I'd have thought that comes with the territory?
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Thu 18-01-18 11:12
Replies: 21
On very easy gradient powder ski the fall line while bouncing up and down. Try to keep the bounces slow and even. Then introduce turning by twisting your upper body on the up-bounce. On the down-bounce tighten your core to unwind the twist - exactly as in the video above. Some people call this anticipating the turn. +1 that is what I was saying, point about anticipation is a useful addition. the other thing I have told people that has been an "aha!" relates to the "slow and even". Once you begin to get a feel for it, try waiting that fraction of a second longer than you think you should at the end of the turn when you are flexed before extending. It is the antithesis of forcing the skis around. Seems to really help getting the effortless tempo. Another thing that a good friend suggested to me which I find very helpful is that when you are in tight terrain (trees, bushes, gullies etc) stay low and flexed between turns (he calls it the "ready position"). It means you are always able to extend and turn in an instant if you need to. Actually think this thread covers nearly all the key points I know about skiing powder.
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Thu 18-01-18 10:59
Replies: 8
Still hoping to catch up with you in a hut, preferably with a big fire. that would be great. I have only been down the Milieu after climbing the North Face in about 1992. In those circumstances I didn't notice it Yes - can see that! I'd been up the Fleche Rousse arete (1991 I think) but ended up off route in a 60 degree ice gulley (I think Y couloir) with one axe and no ice screws. Had a go at chopping handholds (ridiculous given limited experience and talent but descent was blocked by hideous rock fall). Took a fall onto a DMM wallnut wedged between blue ice and the rock at the edge of the gulley. Probably only fell 30 feet but ended up with my crampons waving in my second's face. I literally couldn't believe the protection had held. We quickly concluded that there was no way we were getting up the ice. After I stopped gibbering I managed to force a route up the rock was to rejoin the route. Think my nerves were a bit shredded by the time we were heading down the Mileux. Snow cover was a bit thin (was the tail end of some very dry years and a hot august), we were bombed by big rocks (one the size of a big old TV set bounced over our heads while we moving together on the steep section) and then the last snow bridge on a big crevasse had collapsed meaning that we had set up to protect a running jump. My partner lost interest in alpine climbing after that trip... It was the last proper route I did too. Truth is I think most Brits heading top Chamonix to take their first steps in alpine climbing have similar cock ups. You need to learn from them rather than get killed by them. I was never going to climb hard stuff (see lack of talent above!) but you can get into all sorts of escapades at whatever level you climb in the Alps. As for the NF of Mont Blanc; chuffing Nora. Don't know about you, but I think that getting my legs to obey commands after about 2000 metres in a day at over 4500m: that is a consideration for April. Completely agree, I'm reasonably fit and have good natural stamina but I do feel the altitude. I'd find the last 1000m on Mont Blanc REALLY hard without proper acclimatisation. Think I'd want to take a week and spend a few nights high up before I tried it.
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Thu 18-01-18 10:25
Replies: 10
@jedster, a bit harsh, no? Yes there are plenty of wealthy Brits there who want to have a great time on and off the piste. Most I have met have been a lot of fun. It was a little tongue in cheek hence the smiley. I'm not suggesting they are bad people just the find the migration of a certain group of City working/West London residents from one bubble to another a bit wearing. That said, I worked a season in Courchevel years ago and love the skiing there too. I wouldn't claim it was tasteful though. Feel the same about Verbier. Taste of course is in the eye of the beholder
And post your own questions...
Wed 17-01-18 20:25
Replies: 30
@rob@rar, Yes - totally agree - he is countered at times but in no way is he consistently facing down the fall line. Although I am obviously not going to ski like that I do find the images of pro racers helpful in that everything is so exaggerated it makes the body shapes etc more obvious. It's clear what you should be aiming for even if you are not going to go all the way.
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Wed 17-01-18 20:15
Replies: 21
@Mike S, I think it is more technical. Short turns in powder are more about pivoting the ski than "carving" it using the shape/radius. The usual reason why people struggle to get skis round quickly in the powder is that they have their weight to far back rather than centred as a result they have to force the skis round. I'd suggest the following: 1. find a fairly gentle powder field and set off in a straight line 2. flex and extend your legs without trying to turn, try to get into an easy unhurried rhythm and stay centred, weight on the balls/centre of your feet not the heels 3. when you are comfortable, as you extend push your tails round into a turn - you are trying to get a feel for how effortless the unweighted push is 4. link turns by flexing after the push ready to extend again and make a second turn
And they're a friendly bunch.
Wed 17-01-18 20:06
Replies: 8
@HammondR, Baud's book of death gives the Armancette AD, with a 200m 35 degree crux I've got the book but you have to be careful because when he quotes that he is talking about skiing the Armancette from the Col de la Berangere not from the top of the Domes - the section down to the col is the crux and is 40 degrees I think. Still fair point and as I remember the Milieu feels pretty exposed in descent as you are looking straight down the bloody thing and its a long way. Honestly though I don't know if we'd ski from the top. Guess it will depend on what our guide makes of the snow conditions. He did suggest that we could handle the NF of Mont Blanc (from the summit) which I think is also 45 degrees and pretty airy. That is one for the future though - I'd need to be really well acclimatised to handle the altitude and that needs a longer trip. Mont Dolent is a good idea too. I know what you mean about getting tied on to get your money's worth. The Domes des Miages had a spicy ice arete when we were up there and having the Greg mess around with ice screws and put in a fixed rope while we tried not to look down the North Face was properly atmospheric :D
You know it makes sense.
Wed 17-01-18 19:28
Replies: 30
@rjs, OK - let's analyse this http://snowmediazone.com/the_zone/data/1331/medium/svindal_bc_2009_gs_2E.jpg This is Aksel Svindal skiing GS. I hope you'll agree that the bloke knows how to ski. I imagine it would be tricky to win world championships if you can't. Please tell me if he is facing down the fall line through these turns. Look in particular at the images just before and just after he changes edges between the lower two gates. I'd say he is looking much more towards the final gate than down the fall line (which would require his body to be much more countered). I think it is very poor advice to suggest that when making long / GS turns you should aim to face down the fall line. You clearly have problems with BASI teaching - I've never had any lessons from BASI instructors and have no skin in that game, you may have a point. But your thinking on where to face on GS turns is just wrong.
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Wed 17-01-18 16:13
Replies: 8
Thanks guys, Col du passion does look nice. I had a minor epic on the Aig du Argentiere when I was 20 (in summer, ahem, 27 years ago :shock: ) and am quite keen to get up there again. Only descended by the milieux glacier but my recollection is that the top 500m would be quite a sporty ski. Doesnít seem steeper than the Armancette which we skied last year though
Poster: A snowHead
Wed 17-01-18 14:13
Replies: 8
Weíve started discussing options for a little ski touring trip in March with our guide. Heís come with a couple of options for a three day trip - either two nights in the Argentiere hut or one there and one at the Albert Premier. First option would include the aiguille díargentiere via the meileur glacier. Any other must dos in that area? Iíd say that the aiguille díargentiere is probably our level - not up for anything desperate on Les courtes, droites etc
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Wed 17-01-18 14:01
Replies: 22
@Thighs, Iíd also suggest that you find room in your budget for a couple of guided days - after all you are coming all the way here. You may be able to keep the costs down by joining a group - ask in the guides office when you get to resort if they will have a group running. Guide will provide transceiver etc Youíve had good advice on places to go but Iíd second guess ones/Alagna as you are flying to Milan. Also think sestriere/sauze díoulx are great if you like tree skiing. Could go from there to cormayeur and then chamonix
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Wed 17-01-18 13:53
Replies: 10
The skiing in verbier is great but I struggle to associate the place with good taste given the particular kind of British hooray banker who tends to favour it :)
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Wed 17-01-18 10:41
Replies: 72
Even wearing top quality gear, when the wind gets up in an exposed chairlift you REALLY know about it.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Wed 17-01-18 10:39
Replies: 72
@under a new name, I donít know, Iíve been hiking, skiing, climbing, sailing for > 30 years and windchill has always been a thing in my world. Hypothermia risk is worse when itís windy
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Tue 16-01-18 14:32
Replies: 47
As an extreme example, if you straightline a slope, it really doesn't matter if it's icy or not as you're not trying to get an edge anyway. on really an acceptable approach on a closed piste though "The go really fast and hope you hit a flat spot before you need to make a sharp turn" is bang out of order if there are people to avoid.
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Tue 16-01-18 14:28
Replies: 100
what is wrong with "excuse me" or "excuse moi" etc?
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Tue 16-01-18 14:25
Replies: 72
@under a new name, Even wearing windproof clothing the warm air layers under your shell are more vulnerable to being sucked out than the air in a car. you don't have airtight seals round your neck, cuffs, waist etc
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Tue 16-01-18 14:00
Replies: 30
@karin, I think that is a pretty good explanation actually and very much consistent with the photomontages I linked to. Head and shoulders are at varying angles to the fall line through the turn, moving more with direction of COM
And post your own questions...
Tue 16-01-18 13:54
Replies: 30
jedster wrote: Quote: race technique is to be "stacked" up to the waist, with the pelvis tracking round with the skis. @rjs, you just contradicted yourself! I agree with what I quote above - as RLM's pics show. But that is definitely not the same as Quote: Real GS technique is to keep the body facing down the fall line for longer turns i.e. "tracking round with the skis" is NOT "facing down the fall line"! I should have written "keep the upper body facing down the fall line" No - that is wrong for GS/long turns. Fair enough for short turns just as @Dave of the Marmottes, says
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Mon 15-01-18 18:56
Replies: 30
race technique is to be "stacked" up to the waist, with the pelvis tracking round with the skis. @rjs, you just contradicted yourself! I agree with what I quote above - as RLM's pics show. But that is definitely not the same as Real GS technique is to keep the body facing down the fall line for longer turns i.e. "tracking round with the skis" is NOT "facing down the fall line"!
And they're a friendly bunch.
Mon 15-01-18 13:48
Replies: 15
will grab that and take a look It is an amazing book - full of ideas and observations that make you see the world differentlt - but then it is essentially a precis of the life's work of a Nobel Laureate (Daniel Kahneman).
You know it makes sense.
Mon 15-01-18 11:46
Replies: 30
@rjs, Really? If you look at Ron Le Master's bible of photo montages you'll see lots of world class GS skiers looking at the apex of the turn rather than down the fall line. e.g., https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ron+le+master+photo+montage+gs&rlz=1C1GGRV_enGB752GB752&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=-Dmgxr-PQ3SlBM%253A%252CylSoLlYG6tvfpM%252C_&usg=__M2v5kCbnAai6LCLh4c4ePl9I5Ik%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj03emA5dnYAhWJJcAKHZ8AAYkQ9QEILzAB#imgrc=AHBsY_jKr0k6kM:
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Mon 15-01-18 11:41
Replies: 18
I carried a climbing helmet with me on my last multi-day trip. Never wore it. I'll try to leave it behind next time. I tend to carry a ski helmet on side-country trips with moderate skinning where I'm not dealing with the weight associated with glacier travel. Could not possibly wear one on the uphill. I'd melt.
Poster: A snowHead
Mon 15-01-18 11:36
Replies: 15
Happened last night when I was going through a vehicle restriction - narrow for my car but one I have been through many times - thought: 'that curvy bit of pavement sticks out, I don't want to rub the front tyres on it'....'oh b====er'.... Worth reading "Thinking fast and slow" if you haven't. Essentially we have two forms of processing - conscious analytical (slow from first principles) and heuristic/instinctive (fast from experience, rules of thumb, pattern recognition). Fast thinking is brilliant until it isn't (pattern recognition is fooled, problem is counter intuitive). Slow thinking is really powerful but most people find it very sapping and hard work and will avoid it in a similar way to they avoid physical pain. It can also lead to "over-thinking". What happens with your restriction example is when you focus on it you shut down your instinctive process and switch to the analytical one which is simply less good at spacial awareness. Kind of obstructs the "grooving" of your skills that comes with practice and leads to unconscious competence. Plenty of analogies in sport. Also consider that moment at the ATM when rather than just type your PIN in without thinking, you consciously try to remember it and can't. I had one of those recently. So on the target fixation, I'd say it is similar stuff - if you focus too much on the trees you go into "slow" mode and lose a bit of the practiced skills that left to their own devices would get you round the obstacle.
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Sat 13-01-18 20:56
Replies: 14
@reh_stuff, Ah, Iím afraid that the boots are 24.5 (24 Shell / 24.5 liner). Think you are after 25?
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Fri 12-01-18 15:02
Replies: 1542
well well well I'm off for a long weekend skiing with the boys on the 19th Could be epic Think hiring a 4x4 octavia could end up being a brilliant call :D
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Fri 12-01-18 11:02
Replies: 14
Sorry - got home really late last night - will get on with it tonight
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Thu 11-01-18 15:17
Replies: 14
I've been buying boots for my kids for a few years. They've now got big enough to use my wife's cast offs and my 15 year old boy is skied in a semi-retired pair of mine at Xmas (although I'm having some second thoughts about that). First off I'd point out that they grow really fast. If a boot fits decently it can be a bit painful when they grow out of it before your next trip. Fortunately my kids have similar shaped feet (and to my wife) so we've been able to hand down. I've never bought new boots for them. One pair were unused but VERY old stock and we got them very cheap. Ski Bartlett used to sell second hand kids equipment but stopped because ebay works so well. The best approach I've found is to ask a rental shop in resort if you can rent a pair and buy them at the end of the week if the child gets on with them. On the two occasions I've asked they have happily said yes and have sold them to me for less than one weeks more rent! To be fair these have been older scuffed up boots but perfectly serviceable. On flex, both my kids ski pretty well so have been able to ski comfortably in my wife's boots (despite the fact she is considerably heavier - don't tell her I said that!). My boy is 15, very lean but putting on a bit of muscle but still only 52kg or something. I was initially a bit nervous that my old 110 flex boots might have been too much for him but he actually skied fine. TBH they are probably a little wide/packed out which is why I'm having second thoughts - may just rent in Feb as he won't be with us at Easter and may well have grown again by Xmas! @reh_stuff, I might just have a pair of outgrown 25 boots that would suit your daughter. Nothing glamorous but perfectly serviceable (4 clip etc). They don't owe me anything so if they are the right size you could have them for postage and a little donation to snowheads. I'll check size tonight
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Thu 11-01-18 14:59
Replies: 23
generally a semi-retired pair of off road running shoes (I like inov-8) they have a chunky lugged sole that works well on snow No problem accommodating ski socks because mine are not much thicker than normal socks. As they should be if your boots fit right 8) A lot of the time I'm skiing in touring boots of some description so walking across the car park isn't a problem anyway
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Thu 11-01-18 12:27
Replies: 129
I'm with @Jonny996, I'd head to St G - the pistes are nearly all tree lined and you can link wooded sections with meadows glades if you venture off piste. Ideal in bad weather. Very little easy tree skiing - on or off piste - at Les C. There are some off piste options in the trees but needs a bit of local knowledge. Unsurprisingly the big open bowls get pretty blowy in a storm!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Thu 11-01-18 12:20
Replies: 14
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Wed 10-01-18 17:37
Replies: 34
And just to add, those intuition liners are better than the ones you get as standard (the whole liner is a thick layer of thermoformable foam). Boot manufacturers who supply with Intuitions genuinely make a point of talking about them as a key feature but even those ones are cheaper thinner than Powerwraps (I own both). I agree that the footbeds should be fine. And that boots havenít come on that much in 12 years. My son is currently skiing in a pair of my boots that have been skied hard for more than twelve years.
And post your own questions...
Wed 10-01-18 11:07
Replies: 8
agree about the super 7 but perhaps worth saying that radius is not a good predictor of "turnability" in this kind of ski simply because it is rare that you carve them, mainly about pivot and drift. For example my redeemers are extremely nimble in the trees. That said, I think radius does matter for piste performance which @rungsp's does care about.
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Wed 10-01-18 11:01
Replies: 129
the replacement for epaule? Did they open the lift to the top as well? I hiked past it in the summer and sat next to the construction crew at the restaurant on the ridge. Will be a big improvement I think
And they're a friendly bunch.
Wed 10-01-18 9:32
Replies: 129
Found around 15 inches of fresh snow at the top of Mont Joly at St Gervais today and it had snowed down to about 1500m. Good times. Nice. Bit surprised they opened the chair - Mont Joly is a bit notorious for avalanche risk and often slow to open after a fall like that
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