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Poster: A snowHead
Sun 5-02-17 10:27
Replies: 157
Better conditions in later week. Still a bit sketchy on runs <1800m, but it was bunging it down with snow when we left early this morning and still falling as snow well below 1000m and all the way to the bottom of the climb up the mountain. Should be good for those going this week!
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Sun 25-12-16 12:55
Replies: 70
From your description of not even being able to stand up tall on a flat bit of gradient, I'm almost certain that it's an excessive amount of forward lean in your boot that's causing it. I'd be incredibly sceptical of what the boot fitter told you - there are only a handful of them in the UK that are really experts, and most have just done a short course - which boot fitter was it? Your COG is meant to be balanced over the centre of your boot when you stand on a flat surface; it certainly shouldn't be in front of your toes! The link to the Pink Pants thread that @gorilla provided is a good one and features info from one of the few guys in the UK that knows his onions regarding boot fitting and alignment: @CEM (does he still post here??). In the meantime, try the squat test in your boots. This is where you stand on a flat surface and do a deep(ish) squat with your arms out in front of you. If your boots have the appropriate lean, your knees should be, more or less, directly under your shoulders/armpits. My guess is that your shoulders will be a good few inches in front of your knees. see pic in link:https://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Fi911.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fac317%2FmtnXtC%2Fron1.jpg%3Ft%3D1300754056&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.theskidiva.com%2Fforums%2Findex.php%3Fthreads%2Fhelp-another-side-of-calf-boot-pain-issue.11906%2Fpage-2&docid=892jwGC5ZEBV5M&tbnid=FJ0vD82ov3FISM%3A&vet=1&w=530&h=313&source=sh%2Fx%2Fim As a disclaimer, I'm not an instructor (although I do have CSIA level 2), but a mechanical engineer, recreational weightlifter and 35 yrs experienced skier.
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Thu 7-07-16 22:54
Replies: 85
I know it's July but I'm bored, so here goes: The difference for me between the 2nd and 3rd clip was that, post alignment, the skier was starting to use his ankle joint (just about) to initiate the turn making it all look much smoother and easier to disengage the edges.
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Wed 10-02-16 10:27
Replies: 1345
Over in Morzine for the half term week with the family. Birthday on Monday. Any recommendations for a nice birthday lunch. Somewhere pleasant, cosy with a good atmosphere - that doesn't break the bank. Ta Red La Paika restaurant is my favourite on slope restaurant in the PDS (possibly the Alpes). It does a BBQ, even when it's chucking it down with snow. It's right next to the Turche drag lift (about half way up) at the far end of the Les Gets area.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Wed 10-02-16 8:47
Replies: 25
@calh27, you want to be thinking more about standing centrally with the weight over your fore foot rather than forcing pressure into your shins. I would guess that skidding your turns has more to do with one or combination of 3 things. 1. if you are pushing your tails of the skis out early in the turn 2. the pressure you are or are not applying to the outside ski 3. how you are using the ski edges I think someone said that this graphic was designed to show boot stiffness, but I think the graphic is useful to show a good stance that doesn't have excessive forward lean. http://greghilton.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/boot-fitting-stick-figure-stance-balance.jpg That graphic is about boots but not stiffness. It's to demonstrate that boots (and binding ramp set up) that cause your knees to be either too far forward or too upright will make it very hard to attain a centred balanced stance without being backseat (graphic C1) or too far forward at the hips (graphic B1) to compensate. See the epic pink pants thread from last season! :D
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Thu 31-12-15 17:56
Replies: 5115
Ok wise ones - I am broadly free between now and monday week, the 11th Jan, but my missus will only realistically tolerate a four day absence. Where do I go and when for best powder and conditions ? Thinking flight to geneva and then somewhere in france Unfortunately my brother can't go until wed morning - am I going to miss the best of it or catch a mooted second / third storm? Grow a pair and go for a week.
Well, it's only polite to Register
Tue 22-12-15 18:40
Replies: 5115
@stodge, similar, last year was on Saturday 27th!
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Thu 3-12-15 14:12
Replies: 27
I'll second the suggestion for a pair of Yaktrax to put on them; they provide fantastic grip and are very easy to put on and remove (and stick on your pocket) as and when needed.
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Thu 5-11-15 13:11
Replies: 30
Even with only 2 of you, you'll find your options limited if you wait much longer. And once the first snowflake starts falling, it'll be a race to book up those last few remaining places.
And post your own questions...
Thu 5-11-15 12:19
Replies: 18
I had a Societe General account when I was there for a year. They were shit; although that may have been because I was a student and had very little money, so they didn't care.
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Thu 5-11-15 8:57
Replies: 38
Bodypump is for girls; heavy low rep squats and deadlifts are for men (and women with great arses).
And they're a friendly bunch.
Mon 18-05-15 14:10
Replies: 38
Worth bouncing this old thread to report that since being bought out by Hotelplan (about 3 years ago) Ski Total are now absolute toilet. Everything about this once decent tour operator has deteriorated: food, staff, chalet facilities and maintenance, airport/resort transfers, not to mention customer service and value.
You know it makes sense.
Mon 23-02-15 9:20
Replies: 169
@mayr, Think it was resolved that boot flex was too soft for a big bloke; however the cause of the sore thighs was that the boots were putting his knees too far forward to be able to adopt a balanced stance (without going back seat to compensate).
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Sat 14-02-15 22:54
Replies: 169
Glad you managed to get it sorted at last, at least before the boys' ski holiday anyway. I believe that @gorilla and I have won the internet. Thank you and goodnight. ;-)
Poster: A snowHead
Sat 14-02-15 20:57
Replies: 169
@never summer, in pic 1 his centre of mass looks as if it is, more or less, over the middle of his boot - the problem is that he has to take a back seat stance to achieve this to compensate for the ankle angle the boot forces him into. This has been done to death now: He's had a week's worth of lessons to try and correct it, to no avail. Two well respected boot fitters have said that his boots need tweaking to allow a more upright lower leg, and also that they are not stiff enough for a bloke of his size - 110kg is a big bloke. I think that they could be correct with this one.
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Fri 13-02-15 8:27
Replies: 15
I'd go with the 2 hours as well; 1 hour will be over very quickly. Don't expect magic though. It's the practice that she puts in after the lesson (doing what the instructor says) that will make her a good skier, so she really needs to want to improve.
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Thu 12-02-15 17:24
Replies: 169
@Designer156, This is all so exciting. Does the winner of this particular bio mechanics analysis competition get your (unwashed) pink pants as a prize?
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Wed 11-02-15 16:53
Replies: 45
@TTT, I knew of a boot fitter in Annecy when I lived there, who seemed to be well regarded in the town. I think you'd probably find such shops in most towns near the mountains, just not in the resorts themselves for cost and business viability reasons. As for skiing being like walking, seriously? We've evolved into walking on 2 feet over 10s of thousands of years. Having 2 stiff planks attached to our feet isn't natural and is going to need some technical setting up at the interface to correspond to differing bio mechanics.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Wed 11-02-15 15:27
Replies: 45
@kitenski, You shouldn't have to forcibly flex your boot to be in the basic balanced stance (A1 on that stick man diagram) - your boot and binding ramp angle should be set up correctly to do this. Can you imagine having to have your shins pressed hard against the front of your boots all day just to be in the balanced stance? There'd be no skin left. Like I said, that diagram is nothing to do with technique; it's to demonstrate the importance of correct boot angle set up. To back up my point, and for a better explanation of what I put, see the post by Bob Barnes on this forum link - he's the guy who created that stick figure graphic that you posted. http://www.epicski.com/t/68624/forward-pressure-and-boot-lean
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Wed 11-02-15 11:26
Replies: 45
@kitenski, That graphic is to demonstrate the effect that the angle imparted by the boot and binding can have. As shown in C, excessive forward boot (and binding) angle causes the skier to be back seat in what should be a normal relaxed stance. You can't change this by technique. Boots can be flexed forward, as they're designed to; however, even the world's best skiers can not bend a boot into a more upright position.
Well, it's only polite to Register
Wed 11-02-15 9:29
Replies: 45
@shazchip, seems to be too much of a coincidence that it's suddenly happened with new boots. Similar happened to me (after 25 years of skiing). Although in my case it was down to new skis, specifically the bindings, which were putting my knees too far forward due to having a greater front/rear delta than my previous pairs. There's a great book called the all mountain skier by R Mark Elling - it is my skiing bible. Lots of good technique chapters, but a whole section on getting gear correctly fitted and boots and bindings aligned so that you don't get knackered thighs.
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Tue 10-02-15 15:27
Replies: 169
@TTT, We seem to be in broad agreement! As for why there are very few decent bootfitters in resorts, that's simple: money. The average resort ski shop gets 4 months a year to maximise their income. This is done by employing cheap seasonal workers with limited experience and knowledge and shifting as many pairs of ski boots - either hire or sale - as possible every week to the average 6 days a year skier. Having an expert bootfitter spend 2 hours on every punter that comes in the door isn't going to maximise their profits. This is why I'd always advise people to seek out a UK based fitter. They're not under the same time pressure as someone working in a resort shop.
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Tue 10-02-15 15:16
Replies: 45
If I've understood this correctly, you were fine for your 6 weeks in rental boots and your previous (oversized) boots. Since getting a new pair you're getting unbearable thigh burn very quickly. Certainly sounds like it's the boots. Here's a an easy test: Put your boots on and do a deep squat with your arms held out in front of you. Where are your armpits in relation to your knees? They should be directly above them; my suspicion is that they'll be on front, which means your having to ski back seat to centre your weight, which is why you've got the thigh burn. See the helpful advice given on the following forum page for a better (and illustrated) description. https://www.j2ski.com/ski-chat-forum/posts/list/12025.page If you're not sure, post of pic of you doing it in your best pink pants.
And post your own questions...
Tue 10-02-15 14:13
Replies: 169
@TTT, I would be very surprised if pros and locals don't take a lot of care with their equipment set up, and yes, they most definitely would have the right skills and experience to make the right decisions about equipment. For example, anyone who's skied a fair bit will know that the first time that you put on a new pair of correctly sized boots, they will be particularly tight to the extent of being unbearably uncomfortable after 2-3 hours; however, you also know that this discomfort will diminish over 3-4 days skiing resulting in a very well fitted boot for the next 100+ days skiing. An instructor (or good skier in general) will instinctively have their fore/aft balance centred to enable the ski to turn and grip effectively when they want it too. However, if the boot/binding combo puts them too far forward, they'll still be able to ski it, but they'll be forced into a back seat position to get their weight in the right place over the ski and will get knackered thighs. If you ski with you weight too far forward, it's very hard to do anything other than snowplough/stem turns.
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Fri 6-02-15 13:18
Replies: 5
What @born2ski said: concentrate on keeping your upper body pointing down the hill independent of your legs - known as upper/lower body separation - and also practice the (brilliant) double pole drag drill to improve angulation. That should keep you going for a week. Lots to learn, but overloading yourself with too much technical stuff can be a hindrance when you're starting out, and other stuff may come naturally - for someone with just one week of skiing, you're impressively good on that video.
And they're a friendly bunch.
Fri 6-02-15 7:59
Replies: 3230
Does that show milder weather until the 18th, with the possibility of some snow over 18-19th, or have I completely mis-read that chart??? :~/
You know it makes sense.
Wed 4-02-15 19:02
Replies: 169
@lampbus, you can definitely be too far forward. Your weight should be more or less over the middle of the ski, which distributes pressure nice and evenly across the edge when the ski is edged, and also facilitates pivoting when the ski is flattened to make a turn. The reason that it's often thought that forward lean is good, is that when you're a beginner, the natural mistake is to lean too far back (often out of fear); hence, instructors are often heard telling their clients to lean forwards. If a good skier were to lean forward as much as he/she could, they'd struggle to make decent turns.
Otherwise you'll just go on seeing the one name:
Wed 4-02-15 9:49
Replies: 169
@rob@rar, guess it's up to the OP on what he wants to do then. Interested to see how and if he resolves this. FWIW my assertion comes from a similar equipment issue I had about 5 years ago. I was getting knackered thighs for the first time in 30 years of skiing. It was due to the bindings on my new skis having a ramp angle that was putting me too far forward.
Poster: A snowHead
Wed 4-02-15 9:22
Replies: 169
OK last comment I'll make on this thread: He's skiing back seat; this is correct. However, this is to compensate for the excessive forward lean that his boots are forcing his lower leg into (so that his weight can still be over the middle of the binding). This can't be corrected by any number of (costly) private lessons. He should be able to stand up when not on skis in a relaxed extended stance without his thighs being 'tuned in'. Again, no skiing instruction will correct this, obviously. The above can be probably fixed by a boot fitter for less than the cost of a 1 hour lesson. Speak to @CEM to either arrange an appointment or to get a recommendation of someone local.
Obviously A snowHead isn't a real person
Wed 4-02-15 6:56
Replies: 48
There seems to be a bit of confusion above about what the pole dragging drill is; it's not an indication of incorrect lazy skiing. Hands should be in normal position - not by hips - and both poles should be in constant contact with the snow. See this vid for example of how it forces the skier into good angulation throughout the turn. http://www.dartfish.tv/webpresenter/Player.aspx?CR=p1490c3372m1768229 It's a drill obviously, but you can actually ski all day like this without looking silly if you want to really nail it.
Well, the person's real but it's just a made up name.
Tue 3-02-15 15:54
Replies: 48
Just re-read this and noticed someone mentioned the pole dragging drill - a brilliantly effective drill to perfect your angulation. If you do only one drill all holiday, do this. You can ski just as fast as normal, so they'll be no issues with holding the group up.
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Tue 3-02-15 14:22
Replies: 169
I know all the suggestions for lessons and tekkers advice is well intended, but no amount of instruction on ski stance will affect the fact that his thighs are taking too much strain just by standing up in his boots on the floor. If that's the case then he'll never be able to ski well without thigh burn. I'm not usually dogmatic, but from the description of his anatomy etc. and sexy pants pics, I'm 100% certain that this is an equipment issue. It doesn't necessarily need new boots, just a visit to a fitter that knows his onions and can make the appropriate adjustments on the forward lean.
Anyway, snowHeads is much more fun if you do.
Tue 3-02-15 13:50
Replies: 169
@rob@rar, It'll definitely fix the problem of burning thighs while standing up in the bar in his boots - this is a good start.
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Tue 3-02-15 13:05
Replies: 169
The bloke has stated that even when just standing in them off of his skis his thighs are taking the strain. There's no way that this is a skiing tekkers issue. And you can marry my sister Dorris if I'm wrong.
Well, it's only polite to Register
Tue 3-02-15 11:36
Replies: 169
Probably with checking out the recent thread titled 'thigh burn' on this forum. A user has posted a very useful pic that demonstrates appropriate and excessive forward lean as a result of the angle made by a combo of your boots and bindings. [/img]
After all it is free Go on u know u want to!
Tue 3-02-15 11:26
Replies: 169
This is definitely an equipment issue. In pic 1, your centre of gravity (COG) looks like it's near enough above the centre of your boot, which is good. However, to achieve this correct COG position, you're having to take a back seat stance, which will become very tiring on the thighs even for the fittest skier. If you were to ski like pic 2, you'd have your COG over your big toe - too far forward - and would find it very hard to make anything other than snowplough turns. Boots' forward lean can usually be adjusted. Another adjustment that is often overlooked is the angle that the binding gives. The difference in height between the toe plate and heel plate can be anything between 0-6mm as standard and can be adjusted as appropriate by the insertion of shims. Out of interest, why did pro feet stick a heel lift in your boots?
Then you'll get to see more forums.
Sat 31-01-15 9:02
Replies: 48
Some good tips above. My initial tip would relate to a bit more upper/lower body separation: try to keep your chest pointing downhill - not directly downhill, something like 30-45 degrees to the fall line. For John in yellow: he leaves his downhill ski engaged until the very last second, which is why he does that slight step with his inside ski on every turn. One legged skiing is a great drill for people to learn how to flatten their skis and transfer to a new edge without lifting off the snow. His stance is also way too narrow.
And post your own questions...
Thu 29-01-15 8:05
Replies: 69
@Tom Doc, I don't trust those charts. I was once sold a pair of boots based on my shoe size and cross referring to the appropriate mondo size. Once the liners had packed out - after about 4-5 days - my feet were swimming around inside them. Turns out the boots were 1.5 sizes too big. The best way to check size is to do the barefoot shell test. Although, if your boots are nice and tight without the buckles done up more than one or two notches, but comfy enough for a day's skiing, then they sound like a perfect fit.
which other snowHeads love to answer.
Wed 28-01-15 12:00
Replies: 7
As above, there are plenty of beautiful tree lined runs in the Les Gets/Morzine area. In fact last year, when staying in Avoriaz, we headed to this area on the days when it was snowing.
And they're a friendly bunch.
Wed 14-01-15 22:39
Replies: 3230
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